Teaching Cross-Culturally

An Incarnational Model for Learning and Teaching

Teaching Cross-Culturally

How can Christian educators teach effectively in different cultures? Here are winning principles drawn from educational theory and personal experience.

Ministering Cross-Culturally

A Model for Effective Personal Relationships

Ministering Cross-Culturally

With more than 125,000 copies in print, this model for effective personal relationships in a multicultural and multiethnic world has proven successful for many. On the occasion of its thirtieth anniversary, this contemporary classic has been thoroughly updated to reflect Sherwood Lingenfelter's mature thinking on the topic and to communicate with modern readers, helping them minister more effectively to people of different cultural and social backgrounds. It is accessible, practical, and applicable to many ministry situations. An accompanying interactive questionnaire, designed to help students reflect on their own cultural values, is available online through Baker Academic's Textbook eSources.

Cross-cultural Strategies for Improving the Teaching, Training, and Mentoring Skills of Military Transition Team Advisors

Cross-cultural Strategies for Improving the Teaching, Training, and Mentoring Skills of Military Transition Team Advisors

Military doctrine currently provides guidance on various methods to train host-nation security forces (FM3-24); yet U.S. advisors typically have little training in teaching methods, particularly in a cross-cultural environment. This report presents a conceptual framework that identifies individual advisor and counterpart differences, as well as the situational and cultural factors that impact the success and failure of training, coaching, or mentoring. The report includes a comprehensive literature review and data from iterative interviews with host nationals, military transition team members, cross-cultural education experts, and educators and trainers from the United States, Afghanistan, Iraq, and the Horn of Africa. It also includes recommendations that outline innovative methods for training military advisors to more effectively teach and coach their counterparts in a cross-cultural setting. To provide effective advising to host nationals, advisors need expertise in two areas: (1) cross-cultural competencies related to teaching and learning, and (2) cross-cultural teaching strategies. Key cross-cultural competencies pertinent to the military advisor are identified and include understanding the cross-cultural teaching/advising relationship, culturally relevant curriculum and methods, cross-cultural communication, and effective cross-cultural assessment. The report also includes a discussion of structural barriers to effective advising, and recommendations for developing a cross-cultural teaching and training curriculum for Soldiers.

Classroom Discourse in EFL Teaching: A Cross-cultural Perspective

Classroom Discourse in EFL Teaching: A Cross-cultural Perspective

This study analyses examples of classroom discourse, one of the most important influences on students? experience in schools, in EFL classes. The central idea of the author?s enquiry is to compare classroom discourse in two secondary schools in two European countries, namely Austria on the one hand, and Spain on the other hand. The focus of the study is on EFL classes taught by a team of a non-native speaker teacher and a native speaker assistant. The purposes of this study are to gain insights into classroom communication, to compare classroom discourse in two different countries to see whether culturally specific rules of classroom communication might apply, and to investigate the contact situation of two different (if existent) communication strategies in classroom discourse. Therefore, the study aims to answer the following research question: Do the cultural modes of classroom communication in EFL classes (taught by a team of a teacher and an assistant) differ from each other? The data needed for this study were collected by means of video-recording; audio-portions were transcribed; and the data was analysed using methods of Conversational Analysis. The author focuses in particular on turn-taking, the occurrence of the IRE / IRF sequence and simultaneous speech, as well as restarts and pauses. The analysis shows how certain conversational structures, such as simultaneous speech or the IRE / IRF sequence, work in classroom discourse. The results hint at different cultural modes of classroom communication, the main differences concerning the presence of the teacher in the discourse, the degree of smoothness with which the discourse proceeds and the students? degree of involvement in communication. Furthermore, the data shows that different communication strategies are indeed used in classes taught by a team. Interaction with an assistant might increase students? talking time and might, if the assistant is given enough freedom, also result in more fluent student discourse. In addition, the data suggests that some communication strategies are preferable in the context of EFL teaching with the aim of enhancing communicative competence, namely not interfering with regard to content, not selecting next speakers, and offering open discussion activities.

Cross-Cultural Teaching and Learning for Home and International Students

Internationalisation of Pedagogy and Curriculum in Higher Education

Cross-Cultural Teaching and Learning for Home and International Students

Cross cultural teaching and learning for home and international students maps and discusses the increasing internationalisation of teaching and learning at universities around the world. This new phenomenon brings both opportunities and challenges, as it introduces what can be radically different teaching, learning and assessment contexts for both students and staff. This book moves beyond the rhetoric of internationalisation to examine some of the more complex issues for practitioners, researchers, students and those working in transnational or non-Anglophone contexts. It recognises that although universities around the world enthusiastically espouse internationalisation as part of their mission, there is currently little information available about carrying out this vision in terms of pedagogy and curriculum at a practical level. This book fills that gap comprehensively, organising its information around four main themes: New ways of teaching, learning and assessing: Challenges and opportunities for teaching practice, student engagement and participation, assessment and supervision of learning. New ways of designing and delivering curriculum: Internationalising the curriculum for all students within ‘home’ and ‘abroad’ contexts. New ways of thinking and acting: Developing the global citizen, intercultural learning and respectful dialogue, responding to student diversity and equity, enhancing graduate employability and future life trajectories. New ways of listening: Discovering and responding to new or unfamiliar voices among students and staff, embracing ‘other’ academic and intellectual traditions. Illustrated by a wide range of examples from around the world, this book brings together contemporary work and thinking in the areas of cross cultural teaching and internationalisation of the curriculum.

Working Cross-culturally

Identity Learning, Border Crossing and Culture Brokering

Working Cross-culturally

Why do some westerners seem to have a better relationship with Indigenous people than others? Using a narrative research methodology, the author explores

Leading Cross-Culturally

Covenant Relationships for Effective Christian Leadership

Leading Cross-Culturally

In this accessible book, an experienced leader and minister offers keen insight into the dynamics of leadership in multicultural settings. This is Lingenfelter's most widely appealing book yet.

Agents of Transformation

A Guide for Effective Cross-Cultural Ministry

Agents of Transformation

Church planters and cross-cultural workers learn how to cut across cultural biases with the gospel, transforming without "Westernizing."

Handbook of Research on Cross-Cultural Online Learning in Higher Education

Handbook of Research on Cross-Cultural Online Learning in Higher Education

Online learning has been touted as one way of reducing the cost of higher education while simultaneously addressing the increasing demand for educational opportunity and providing access to hitherto “left out” populations. Many universities are defying tradition by offering completely online degrees for global participants. As such, research is needed to improve the design of online and virtual learning environments to ensure that they are inclusive and culturally adaptive for the global education marketplace. The Handbook of Research on Cross-Cultural Online Learning in Higher Education shares paradigms, perspectives, insights, challenges, and best practices for the instructional design and delivery of cross-cultural adult web-based learning experiences and examines adult learner characteristics and competencies critical for the design of these applications. The content within this publication covers trending topics including virtual learning, culturally adaptive environments, and online education and is intended for instructional designers, faculty, administrators, students, and researchers.