Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography

These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography

All autobiographers are unreliable narrators. Yet what a writer chooses to misrepresent is as telling -- perhaps even more so -- as what really happened. Timothy Adams believes that autobiography is an attempt to reconcile one's life with one's self, and he argues in this book that autobiography should not be taken as historically accurate but as metaphorically authentic. Adams focuses on five modern American writers whose autobiographies are particularly complex because of apparent lies that permeate them. In examining their stories, Adams shows that lying in autobiography, especially literary autobiography, is not simply inevitable. Rather it is often a deliberate, highly strategic decision on the author's part. Throughout his analysis, Adams's standard is not literal accuracy but personal authenticity. He attempts to resolve some of the paradoxes of recent autobiographical theory by looking at the classic question of design and truth in autobiography from the underside -- with a focus on lying rather than truth. Originally published in 1990. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

American Autobiography

... with African - American women writers , see Bernice Johnson Reagon , " My Black Mothers and Sisters , or On Beginning a Cultural Autobiography . " WORKS CITED Adams , Timothy Dow . Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography .

American Autobiography

This is the first comprehensive assessment of the major periods and varieties of American autobiography. The eleven original essays in this volume do not only survey what has been done; they also point toward what can and should be done in future studies of a literary genre that is now receiving major scholarly attention. Book jacket.

American Autobiography

The fact that no textbook on American autobiography exists (until now) signifies another impasse: a critical one, ... Timothy Dow Adams' Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography (1990), or to collections of essays edited by Arthur ...

American Autobiography

The first student guide to American autobiographys introduction to the major forms of autobiographical writing in America and important current developments in autobiography studies discusses both 'canonised' texts and those from contemporary writers. Taking a broadly chronological approach, the history of American autobiography is explored including the social and cultural factors that might account for the importance of autobiography in American culture. Then post-1970 autobiographies are examined, taking into account the development in poststructuralism from this time that affected notions of the subject who could write, and conceptions of truth, identity and reference.

Richard Wright

3324 “Telling About the South” 8394 “Telling It on the Mountain” 6580 “Telling Lies in American Autobiography By Timothy ... American Autobiography by Timothy Dow Adams” 2230, 223¡, 2232, 4¡00 Telling Lies in Modern American Biography ...

Richard Wright

African-American writer Richard Wright (1908–1960) was celebrated during the early 1940s for his searing autobiography (Black Boy) and fiction (Native Son). By 1947 he felt so unwelcome in his homeland that he exiled himself and his family in Paris. But his writings changed American culture forever, and today they are mainstays of literature and composition classes. He and his works are also the subjects of numerous critical essays and commentaries by contemporary writers. This volume presents a comprehensive annotated bibliography of those essays, books, and articles from 1983 through 2003. Arranged alphabetically by author within years are some 8,320 entries ranging from unpublished dissertations to book-length studies of African American literature and literary criticism. Also included as an appendix are addenda to the author’s earlier bibliography covering the years from 1934 through 1982. This is the exhaustive reference for serious students of Richard Wright and his critics.

American Indian Children at School 1850 1930

Princeton University Press , 1980 ) ; Timothy Dow Adams , Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography ( Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press , 1990 ) ; Herbert Leibowitz , Fabricating Lives : Explorations in American ...

American Indian Children at School  1850 1930

Drawn from Native American autobiographical accounts, a study revealing white society's program of civilizing American Indian schoolchildren

Multicultural Autobiography

Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography . Chapel Hill : U of North Carolina P , 1990 . Andrews , William L. " In Search of a Common Identity : The Self and the South in Four Mississippi Autobiographies .

Multicultural Autobiography


Light Writing Life Writing

On the surface, the use of photography in autobiography appears to have a straightforward purpose: to illustrate and corroborate the text.

Light Writing   Life Writing

On the surface, the use of photography in autobiography appears to have a straightforward purpose: to illustrate and corroborate the text. But in the wake of poststructuralism, the role of photography in autobiography is far from simple or one-dimensional

Declarations of Independency in Eighteenth century American Autobiography

In Colonial American Travel Narratives . Edited and with an introduction by Wendy Martin . ... New York : Library of America , 1984 . Monticello . ... Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography . Chapel Hill : Univ . of North ...

Declarations of Independency in Eighteenth century American Autobiography

In this ambitious work, Susan Clair Imbarrato examines the changes in the American autobiographical voice as it speaks through the transition from a colonial society to an independent republic.Imbarrato charts the development of early American autobiography from the self-examination mode of the Puritan journal and diary to the self-inventive modes of eighteenth-century writings, which in turn anticipate the more romantic voices of nineteenth-century American literature. She focuses especially on the ways in which first-person narrative displayed an ever-stronger awareness of its own subjectivity. The eighteenth century, she notes, remained closer in temper to its Puritan communal foundations than to its Romantic progeny, but there emerged, nevertheless, a sense of the individual voice that anticipated the democratic celebration of the self. Through acts of self-examination, this study shows, self-construction became possible.In tracing this development, the author focuses on six writers in three literary genres. She begins with the spiritual autobiographies of Jonathan Edwards and Elizabeth Ashbridge and then considers the travel narratives of Dr. Alexander Hamilton and Elizabeth House Trist. She concludes with an examination of political autobiography as exemplified in the writings of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. These authors, Imbarrato finds, were invigorated by their choices in a social-political climate that revered the individual in proper relationship to the republic. Their writings expressed a revolutionary spirit that was neither cynical nor despairing but one that evinced a shared conviction about the bond between self and community.

American Lives

Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography . Chapel Hill : : University of North Carolina Press , 1990 . Adams , Timothy Dow , and Rebecca Hogan , eds . Studies in Women's Autobiography . Auto / Biography Studies 4 ( 1988 ) , special ...

American Lives

American Lives is a groundbreaking book, the first historically organized anthology of American autobiographical writing, bringing us fifty-five voices from throughout the nation's history, from Abigail Adams, Abraham Lincoln, Jonathan Edwards, and Richard Wright to Quaker preacher Elizabeth Ashbridge, con man Stephen Burroughs, and circus impresario P.T. Barnum. Representing canonical and non-canonical writers, slaves and slave-owners, generals and conscientious objectors, scientists, immigrants, and Native Americans, the pieces in this collection make up a rich gathering of American "songs of ourselves." Robert F. Sayre frames the selections with an overview of theory and criticism of autobiography and with commentary on the relation between history and many kinds of autobiographical texts--travel narratives, stories of captivity, diaries of sexual liberation, religious conversions, accounts of political disillusionment, and discoveries of ethnic identity. With each selection Sayre also includes an extensive headnote providing valuable critical and biographical information. A scholarly and popular landmark, American Lives is a book for general readers and for teachers, students, and every American scholar.

Authors Inc

Literary Celebrity in the Modern United States, 1880-1980 Loren Glass ... First Person Singular: Studies in American Autobiography (New York: St. Martin's, 1988); Timothy Dow Adams, Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography (Chapel ...

Authors Inc

White Cargo is the forgotten story of the thousands of Britons who lived and died in bondage in Britain’s American colonies. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, more than 300,000 white people were shipped to America as slaves. Urchins were swept up from London’s streets to labor in the tobacco fields, where life expectancy was no more than two years. Brothels were raided to provide “breeders” for Virginia. Hopeful migrants were duped into signing as indentured servants, unaware they would become personal property who could be bought, sold, and even gambled away. Transported convicts were paraded for sale like livestock. Drawing on letters crying for help, diaries, and court and government archives, Don Jordan and Michael Walsh demonstrate that the brutalities usually associated with black slavery alone were perpetrated on whites throughout British rule. The trade ended with American independence, but the British still tried to sell convicts in their former colonies, which prompted one of the most audacious plots in Anglo-American history. This is a saga of exploration and cruelty spanning 170 years that has been submerged under the overwhelming memory of black slavery. White Cargo brings the brutal, uncomfortable story to the surface.

Writing the South through the Self

I Tell You Now: Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers. ... Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography. ... Andrews, William L. To Tell a Free Story: The First Century of Afro-American Autobiography, 1760–1865.

Writing the South through the Self

Drawing on two decades of teaching a college-level course on southern history as viewed through autobiography and memoir, John C. Inscoe has crafted a series of essays exploring the southern experience as reflected in the life stories of those who lived it. Constantly attuned to the pedagogical value of these narratives, Inscoe argues that they offer exceptional means of teaching young people because the authors focus so fully on their confrontations—as children, adolescents, and young adults—with aspects of southern life that they found to be troublesome, perplexing, or challenging. Maya Angelou, Rick Bragg, Jimmy Carter, Bessie and Sadie Delany, Willie Morris, Pauli Murray, Lillian Smith, and Thomas Wolfe are among the more prominent of the many writers, both famous and obscure, that Inscoe draws on to construct a composite portrait of the South at its most complex and diverse. The power of place; struggles with racial, ethnic, and class identities; the strength and strains of family; educational opportunities both embraced and thwarted—all of these are themes that infuse the works in this most intimate and humanistic of historical genres. Full of powerful and poignant stories, anecdotes, and testimonials, Writing the South through the Self explores the emotional and psychological dimensions of what it has meant to be southern and offers us new ways of understanding the forces that have shaped southern identity in such multifaceted ways.

The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature

Autobiographies in the 20th c . are as diverse as 20th - c . Americans . Particularly strong examples have emerged ... BIBLIOGRAPHY : Adams , T. D. , Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography ( 1990 ) ; Andrews , W. L. , To Tell a ...

The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature

More than ten years in the making, this comprehensive single-volume literary survey is for the student, scholar, and general reader. The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature represents a collaborative effort, involving 300 contributors from across the US and Canada. Composed of more than 1,100 signed biographical-critical entries, this Encyclopedia serves as both guide and companion to the study and appreciation of American literature. A special feature is the topical article, of which there are 70.

Reading Autobiography

2005. www.library.yale.edu/testimonies/ Yeats, W. B. Autobiographies: Reveries over Childhood and Youth and the Trembling of the Veil. ... In Classic American Autobiographies, ed. ... Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography.

Reading Autobiography

With the memoir boom, life storytelling has become ubiquitous and emerged as a distinct field of study. Reading Autobiography, originally published in 2001, was the first comprehensive critical introduction to life writing in all its forms. Widely adopted for undergraduate and graduate-level courses, it is an essential guide for students and scholars reading and interpreting autobiographical texts and methods across the humanities, social sciences, and visual and performing arts. Thoroughly updated, the second edition of Reading Autobiography is the most complete assessment of life narrative in its myriad forms. It lays out a sophisticated, theoretical approach to life writing and the components of autobiographical acts, including memory, experience, identity, embodiment, space, and agency. Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson explore these components, review the history of life writing and the foundations of autobiographical subjectivity, and provide a toolkit for working with twenty-three key concepts. Their survey of innovative forms of life writing, such as autographics and installation self-portraiture, charts recent shifts in autobiographical practice. Especially useful for courses are the appendices: a glossary covering dozens of distinct genres of life writing, proposals for group and classroom projects, and an extensive bibliography.

The Autobiographical Documentary in America

However, like many women's autobiographical documentaries, this film has less to do with the reconstitution of ... Timothy Dow Adams, Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, ...

The Autobiographical Documentary in America

Since the late 1960s, American film and video makers of all genres have been fascinated with themes of self and identity. Though the documentary form is most often used to capture the lives of others, Jim Lane turns his lens on those media makers who document their own lives and identities. He looks at the ways in which autobiographical documentaries—including Roger and Me, Sherman’s March, and Silverlake Life—raise weighty questions about American cultural life. What is the role of women in society? What does it mean to die from AIDS? How do race and class play out in our personal lives? What does it mean to be a member of a family? Examining the history, diversity, and theoretical underpinnings of this increasingly popular documentary form, Lane tracks a fundamental transformation of notions of both autobiography and documentary.

Memoir

Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990. Amelang, James. The Flight of Icarus: Artisan Autobiography in Early Modern Europe. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, ...

Memoir

From a critically acclaimed cultural and literary critic, a definitive history and analysis of the memoir. From Saint Augustine?s Confessions to Augusten Burroughs?s Running with Scissors, from Julius Caesar to Ulysses Grant, from Mark Twain to David Sedaris, the art of memoir has had a fascinating life, and deserves its own biography. Cultural and literary critic Ben Yagoda traces the memoir from its birth in early Christian writings and Roman generals? journals all the way up to the banner year of 2007, which saw memoirs from and about dogs, rock stars, bad dads, good dads, alternadads, waitresses, George Foreman, Iranian women, and a slew of other illustrious persons (and animals). In a time when memoir seems ubiquitous and is still highly controversial, Yagoda tackles the autobiography and memoir in all its forms and iterations. He discusses the fraudulent memoir and provides many examples from the past?and addresses the ramifications and consequences of these books. Spanning decades and nations, styles and subjects, he analyzes the hallmark memoirs of the Western tradition?Rousseau, Ben Franklin, Henry Adams, Gertrude Stein, Edward Gibbon, among others. Yagoda also describes historical trends, such as Native American captive memoirs, slave narratives, courtier dramas (where one had to pay to NOT be included in a courtesan?s memoir). Throughout, the idea of memory and truth, how we remember and how well we remember lives, is intimately explored. Yagoda's elegant examination of memoir is at once a history of literature and taste, and an absorbing glimpse into what humans find interesting--one another.

Sacred Estrangement

Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990. Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1972 Allen, Gay Wilson.

Sacred Estrangement

Sacred Estrangement analyzes certain works by important American writers and thinkers in the context of the "rhetoric of conversion." Such analysis is especially valuable because it provides a reliable index of the relationship between the self and larger communities. Traditionally, "conversion" has served a socializing function, signifying that one has come into alignment with certain linguistic, behavioral, and cultural expectations. The socialization process is particularly apparent in the Christian conversion narratives of the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries: by publicly testifying to a conversion experience, believers became empowered members, not only of God's elect community but also of a local population. As modern autobiography developed in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Christian pattern was secularized and individualized. Conversion became a model for many kinds of psychological change. With the coming of the twentieth century, however, the authors upon whom Peter Dorsey focuses, including William and Henry James, Henry Adams, Edith Wharton, Ellen Glasgow, Zora Neale Hurston, and Richard Wright, radically revised conversion rhetoric. If conversion had traditionally linked the search for illumination with the search for a defined social role, these writers increasingly used conversion as an index of estrangement from mainstream America. Dorsey documents this profound change in the way American intellectuals defined the "self," not in terms of personal orientation toward or away from a given community, but as a resistance to such an orientation altogether, as if social forces by their "nature" were a threat to personal identity.

Post Nationalist American Studies

Syllabus RACE AND GENDER IN AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY Instructor : Barbara Brinson Curiel In this class we will explore life ... Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography ( Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press , 1990 ) .

Post Nationalist American Studies

Post-Nationalist American Studies seeks to revise the cultural nationalism and celebratory American exceptionalism that tended to dominate American studies in the Cold War era, adopting a less insular, more transnational approach to the subject.

Creating Societies

14 Timothy D. Adams , Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography ( Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press , 1990 ) , 2 ; James C. Holte , ed . , The Ethnic I : A Sourcebook for Ethnic - American Autobiography ( Westport ...

Creating Societies

Dirk Hoerder shows us that it is not shining railroad tracks or statesmen in Ottawa that make up the story of Canada but rather individual stories of life and labour - Caribbean women who care for children born in Canada, lonely prairie homesteaders, miners in Alberta and British Columbia, women labouring in factories, Chinese and Japanese immigrants carving out new lives in the face of hostility. Hoerder examines these individual experiences in Creating Societies, the first systematic overview of the total Canadian immigrant experience. Using letters, travel accounts, diaries, memoirs, and reminiscences, he brings the immigrant's experiences to life. Their writings, often recorded for grandchildren, neighbours, and sometimes a larger public, show how immigrant lives were entwined with the emerging Canadian society. Hoerder presents an important new picture of the emerging Canadian identity, dispelling the Canadian myth of a dichotomy between national unity and ethnic diversity and emphasizing the long-standing interaction between the members of a different ethnic groups.

American Authorship and Autobiographical Narrative

“Confessions of an Autobiography Scholar; Or, You Can't Handle the Truthiness.” Biography 32.2 (2009): 340–43. Project MUSE. Web. Dec. 29, 2010. ———. Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, ...

American Authorship and Autobiographical Narrative

This book explores the conflicted relationship writers have with their public image, particularly when they have written about their personal lives. D'Amore analyzes the autobiographical works of Norman Mailer, John Edgar Wideman, and Dave Eggers in light of theories of authorship, autobiography, and celebrity.

Lives of Their Own

Heroines of Modern Progress . New York : Macmillan , 1929 . Adams , Timothy Dow . Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography . Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press , 1990 , Agar , Michael .

Lives of Their Own

Explores how five turn-of-the-century women - Frances Willard, Anna Howard Shaw, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Emma Goldman and Mary Church Terrell - crafted autobiographies that became persuasive models for the women of their generation, and lead to movements for social change.