The Allure of Things Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy

Allure/A-lure. A hint lies in the yet-undisclosed mystery of the initiation of connectivity.64 The center-piece of Harman's move toward the overcoming of the disconnection of real objects among themselves—since their obvious, ...

The Allure of Things  Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy

The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy contests the view that metaphysics is something to be overcome. By focusing on process and object oriented ontology (OOO) and rejecting the privileging of human existence over the existence of non-human objects, this collection explores philosophy's concern with things themselves. Interest in Latour, Stengers, Whitehead, Harman and Meillassoux has prompted a resurgence of ontological questions outside the traditional subject-object framework of modern critical thought. This new collection consequently proposes a pragmatic and pluralist approach to 'modes of existence'. Drawing together an international range of leading scholars, The Allure of Things fully covers the similarities between OOO and process philosophy, and is an essential addition to the literature on metaphysics.

The Cosmic Spirit

In The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy, edited by Roland Faber and Andrew Goffey, 47–67. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2014. ———. “Whitehead at Infinite Speed: Deconstructing System as Event.

The Cosmic Spirit

Are we more than stardust? Is the appearance of the fragile Earth in the vast universe more than an accident? Are we not children of a Spirit that pervades the dust, rejuvenates life, and embraces the ever-evolving universe? Is there a cosmic Spirit that wants us to awaken to a consciousness of universal meaning, sacred purpose, and mutual friendship with all beings? This book answers these questions with a spirituality of the numinous in our relation to the elements of the Earth in the matrix of the multiverse by taking you on a journey through nine paths and nineteen meditations of awakening. Not bound by any religion, but in deep appreciation of the religious and spiritual heritage of human encounters with the divine depth of existence in our selves and in nature, they invite you to become sojourners by engaging the most profound embodiments of the intangible Spirit by which it facilitates its own materialization in the cosmos and our spiritualization of the cosmos. Use--says this Spirit--the stardust that you are to become a spirit-faring species in an eternal journey of the cosmos to realize its ultimate motive of existence--the attraction of love!

The Allure of Things

By focusing on process and object oriented ontology (OOO) and rejecting the privileging of human existence over the existence of non-human objects, this collection explores philosophy's concern with things themselves.

The Allure of Things


In The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy, edited by Roland Faber and Andrew Goffey, 47–67. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2014. ———. “Whitehead at Infinite Speed: Deconstructing System as Event.


New Ways of Working

Atomicity, conformation, enduring objects, and “things”: science and science studies after the Whiteheadian turn. In R. Faber & A. Goffey (Eds.), The Allure of thing: Process and object in contemporary philosophy (pp. 16–35).

New Ways of Working

This volume focuses on new ways of working, and explores implications of these new practices with a particular emphasis on the place occupied by technology, materiality and bodies within contemporary working configurations. It draws together an international range of scholars to examine diverse subjects such as: the gig economy, social media as a work space, the role of materiality in living labs, managerial techniques and organizational legitimacy. Drawing on global perspectives, from France to Nigeria, this book presents a fascinating examination of the many new ways people are working, and relating to their work. Part of the esteemed Technology, Work and Globalization series, this book is valuable reading for scholars working on organizational studies, ethnography, technology management, and management more generally.

Language and Process

Stengers, I. (2014), 'Speculative Philosophy and the Art of Dramatization', in R. Faber and A. Goffey (eds), The Allure of Things. Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy, London: Bloomsbury, pp. 188–217.

Language and Process

Michael Halewood uses ideas from analytic philosophy, continental philosophy and social theory to look at how language relates to the world, and the world to language. He primarily draws on the work of Alfred North Whitehead, and incorporating the ideas of Gilles Deleuze, John Dewey and Luce Irigaray, to view the world as 'in process'.

Critical Environmental Communication

Brown, N. (2013) “The Nadir Of OOO: From Graham Harman's Tool-being to Timothy Morton's Realist Magic: Objects, Ontology, Causality.” Parrhesia, 17, 62–71. ... The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy.

Critical Environmental Communication

This book examines how four contemporary critical theorists deal with the tension between their impulses to doubt and to engage in emancipatory political struggle. Considering the goals of environmental communication, it argues for a stronger critical dimension to embolden both the philosophical rigor and the political efficacy of the discipline.

Romantic Realities

SR is a foregone conclusion, the theorists whom I present reflect above all my own predilections and familiarities.28 Will ... eds., The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy (London and New York: Bloomsbury, ...

Romantic Realities

Reads Romantic literature through the lens of 21st century speculative realist philosophyRead and download the series editor's preface (by Graham Harman) and the Introduction to Romantic Realities for free nowSpeculative realism is one of the most exciting, influential and controversial new branches of philosophy to emerge in recent years. Now, Evan Gottlieb shows that the speculative realism movement bears striking a resemblance to the ideas and beliefs of the best-known British poets of the Romantic era.Romantic Realities analyses the parallels and echoes between the ideas of the most influential contemporary practitioners of speculative realism and the poetry and poetics of the most innovative Romantic poets. In doing so, it introduces you to the intellectual precedents and contemporary stakes of speculative realism, together with new understandings of the philosophical underpinnings and far-reaching insights of British Romanticism.Readings include:The poetry and poetics of Wordsworth in relation to Graham Harman's object-oriented ontology and Timothy Morton's dark ecologyColeridge's poems and ideas in relation to Ray Brassier's philosophical nihilism and Iain Hamilton Grant's revisionist readings of SchellingShelley's oeuvre in relation to Quentin Meillassoux's radical immanentism and Manuel DeLanda's process ontologyByron's best-known poems in relation to Alain Badiou's truth procedures and Bruno Latour's actor-network-theoryKeats' oeuvre in relation to Levi Bryant's onticology and Ian Bogost's alien phenomenology"e;

The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Science

Alfred North Whitehead, Science and the Modern World (New York: Free Press, 1967). 4. ... eds., The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy (London: Bloomsbury, 2014); Nicholas Gaskill and A. J. Nocek, eds., ...

The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Science

In 1959, C. P. Snow lamented the presence of what he called the 'two cultures': the apparently unbridgeable chasm of understanding and knowledge between modern literature and modern science. In recent decades, scholars have worked diligently and often with great ingenuity to interrogate claims like Snow's that represent twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature and science as radically alienated from each other. The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Science offers a roadmap to developments that have contributed to the demonstration and emergence of reciprocal connections between the two domains of inquiry. Weaving together theory and empiricism, individual chapters explore major figures - Shakespeare, Bacon, Emerson, Darwin, Henry James, William James, Whitehead, Einstein, Empson, and McClintock; major genres and modes of writing - fiction, science fiction, non-fiction prose, poetry, and dramatic works; and major theories and movements - pragmatism, critical theory, science studies, cognitive science, ecocriticism, cultural studies, affect theory, digital humanities, and expanded empiricisms. This book will be a key resource for scholars, graduate students, and undergraduate students alike.

After Discourse

In The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy. Edited by Roland Faber and Andrew Goffey. London: Bloomsbury Press. Deleuze, G. 1994. Difference and Repetition. Translated by Paul Patton.

After Discourse

After Discourse is an interdisciplinary response to the recent trend away from linguistic and textual approaches and towards things and their affects. The new millennium brought about serious changes to the intellectual landscape. Favoured approaches associated with the linguistic and the textual turn lost some of their currency, and were followed by a new curiosity and concern for things and their natures. Gathering contributions from archaeology, heritage studies, history, geography, literature and philosophy, After Discourse offers a range of reflections on what things are, how we become affected by them, and the ethical concerns they give rise to. Through a varied constellation of case studies, it explores ways of dealing with matters which fall outside, become othered from, or simply cannot be grasped through perspectives derived solely from language and discourse. After Discourse provides challenging new perspectives for scholars and students interested in other-than-textual encounters between people and the objects with which we share the world.

Diffracted Worlds Diffractive Readings

Things, History and Pragmatic Speculation in A. N. Whitehead' and The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy, eds. Roland Faber and Andrew Goffey (2014). Kathrin Thiele is Associate Professor of Gender Studies ...

Diffracted Worlds   Diffractive Readings

Diffraction patterns in quantum physics evidence the fact that the behavior of matter is the result of its entanglements with measurement, or as Karen Barad suggests, the entanglement of matter and meaning. In this sense, therefore, phenomena (including texts, cultural agents, or life forms) are the results of their relational, onto-epistemological entanglements and not individual entities that separately pre-exist their joint becoming. As such, ‘diffraction’ proposes a new understanding of difference: no longer a dualist understanding, but one going beyond binaries. Diffraction is about patterns, constellations, relationalities. From this angle, the book explores ‘diffraction’, which has begun to impact critical theories and humanities debates, especially via (new) materialist feminisms, STS and quantum thought, but is often used without further reflection upon its implications or potentials. Doing just that, the book also pursues new routes for the onto-epistemological and ethical challenges that arise from our experience of the world as relational and radically immanent; because if we start from the ideas of immanence and entanglement, our conceptions of self and other, culture and nature, cultural and sexual difference, our epistemological procedures and disciplinary boundaries have to be rethought and adjusted. The book offers an in-depth consideration of ‘diffraction’ as a quantum understanding of difference and as a new critical reading method. It reflects on its import in humanities debates and thereby also on some of the most inspiring work recently done at the crossroads of science studies, feminist studies and the critical humanities. This book was originally published as a special issue of Parallax.

Propositions in the Making

Fry, Tony, A New Design Philosophy: An Introduction to Defuturing. Sydney: UNSW Press, 1999. ... Design Philosophy Papers 15, no. 1 (2017): 1–2. ... In The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy, ed.

Propositions in the Making

How do we make ourselves a Whiteheadian proposition? This question exposes the multivalent connections between postmodern thought and Whitehead’s philosophy, with particular attention to his understanding of propositions. Edited by Roland Faber, Michael Halewood, and Andrew M. Davis, Propositions in the Making articulates the newest reaches of Whiteheadian propositions for a postmodern world. It does so by activating interdisciplinary lures of feeling, living, and co-creating the world anew. Rather than a “logical assertion,” Whitehead described a proposition as a “lure for feeling” for a collectivity to come. It cannot be reduced to the verbal content of logical justifications, but rather the feeling content of aesthetic valuations. In creatively expressing these propositions in wide relevance to existential, ethical, educational, theological, aesthetic, technological, and societal concerns, the contributors to this volume enact nothing short of “a Whiteheadian Laboratory.”

Speculative Research

Atomicity, conformation, enduring objects, and athings«: Science and science studies after the Whitheadian turn. In R. Faber, & A. Goffey (Eds), The allure of things: Process and object in contemporary philosophy (pp. 13¥35).

Speculative Research

Is another future possible? So called ‘late modernity’ is marked by the escalating rise in and proliferation of uncertainties and unforeseen events brought about by the interplay between and patterning of social–natural, techno–scientific and political-economic developments. The future has indeed become problematic. The question of how heterogeneous actors engage futures, what intellectual and practical strategies they put into play and what the implications of such strategies are, have become key concerns of recent social and cultural research addressing a diverse range of fields of practice and experience. Exploring questions of speculation, possibilities and futures in contemporary societies, Speculative Research responds to the pressing need to not only critically account for the role of calculative logics and rationalities in managing societal futures, but to develop alternative approaches and sensibilities that take futures seriously as possibilities and that demand new habits and practices of attention, invention, and experimentation.

Creative Ecologies

Stengers, Isabelle (2014), “Speculative Philosophy and the Art of Dramatization', in Roland Faber and Andrew Goffrey (eds), The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy, 188–217, London: Bloomsbury.

Creative Ecologies

Architect and philosopher Hélène Frichot examines how the discipline of architecture is theorized and practiced at the periphery. Eschewing a conventionally direct approach to architectural objects – to iconic buildings and big-name architects – she instead explores the background of architectural practice, to introduce the creative ecologies in which architecture exists only in relation to other objects and ideas. Consisting of a series of philosophical encounters with architectural practice that are neither neatly located in one domain nor the other, this book is concerned with 'other ways of doing architecture'. It examines architecture at the limits where it is muddied by alternative disciplinary influences – whether art practice, philosophy or literature. Frichot meets a range of creative characters who work at the peripheries, and who challenge the central assumptions of the discipline, showing that there is no 'core of architecture' – there is rather architecture as a multiplicity of diverse concerns in engagement with local environments and worlds. From an author well-known in the disciplines of architecture and philosophy for her scholarship on Deleuze, this is a radical, accessible, and highly-original approach to design research, deftly engaging with an array of current topics from the Anthropocene to affect theory, new materialism contemporary feminism.

Contingent Computation

Whitehead, Process and Reality, 222. 30. Whitehead, Symbolism, 36. 31. ... Isabelle Stengers, 'Speculative Philosophy and the Art of Dramatization', in The Allure Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy, ed.

Contingent Computation

Contingent Computation offers a new theoretical perspective through which we can engage philosophically with computing. The book proves that aesthetics is a viable mode of investigating contemporary computational systems.

Handbook of Hinduism in Europe 2 vols

Understanding Climate Change Past and Present. New York: Columbia University Press. ... Damasio, A. (2018) The Strange Order of Things. ... (2014) The Allure of Things. Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury.

Handbook of Hinduism in Europe  2 vols

The Handbook of Hinduism in Europe portrays and analyses Hindu traditions in every country in Europe. It presents the main Hindu communities, religious groups, forms and teachings present in the continent and shows that Hinduism have become a major religion in Europe.

Ardeth 01 I 2017

R. Bononno, Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press. Stengers, I. (2014), Speculative Philosophy and the Art of Dramatisation, in R. Faber, A. Goffey (eds.), The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy, ...

Ardeth  01  I   2017

Unlike the many magazines that revolve around the architectural world, Ardeth concerns neither with outcomes (architecture) nor with the authors (architects). Ardeth concerns instead with their operational work, i.e. projects. The shift from subjects (their good intentions, as taught in Universities and reclaimed in the profession) to objects (the products of design, at work within the social system that contains them) engenders an analytical and falsifiable elaboration of the complex mechanisms that an open practice such as design involves. Through a process of disciplinary redefinition, Ardeth explores the falsifiability of design hypotheses as the object that allows the project to scientifically confront errors and approximations.

Haunted Data

Faber, Roland and Goffey, Andrew (eds) (2014) The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic. Fanon, Franz (1967) Black Skin, White Masks. London and New York: Pluto Press.

Haunted Data

Haunted Data explores the concepts that are at work in our complex relationships with data. Our engagement with data – big or small – is never as simplistic or straightforward as might first appear. Indeed, Blackman argues that our relationship with data is haunted with errors, dead ends, ghostly figures, and misunderstandings that challenge core assumptions about the nature of thought, consciousness, mind, cognition, affect, communication, control and rationality, both human and non-human. Using contemporary controversies from 'weird science' including the field of priming and its uncanny relations to animal telepathy, as well as artificial intelligences and their curious relation to psychic research ('clairvoyant computers'), Blackman shows how some of the current crises in science in these areas reveal more than scientists are willing or even able to acknowledge. In addition to proposing a new theory of how we might engage with data, Haunted Data also provides a nuanced survey of the historical context to contemporary debates, going back to the 19th Century origins of modern computation and science to explain the ubiquity and oddness of our data relations. Drawing from radical philosophies of science, feminist science studies, queer theory, cultural studies, and the field of affect studies, the book develops a manifesto for how artists, philosophers and scientists might engage creatively and critically with science within the context of digital communication.

Walter Pater

The Lady Lisa , as an inevitable object of the quest for all which we have lost , is herself a process moving toward a final ... and of Darwinianism ( “ modern philosophy " ) , ends the passage with an astonishing conceptual image .

Walter Pater


Selected Writings of Walter Pater

The Lady Lisa , as an inevitable object of the quest for all which we have lost , is herself a process moving toward a final ... and of Darwinianism ( “ modern philosophy " ) , ends the passage with an astonishing conceptual image .

Selected Writings of Walter Pater