The American College and University

In his foreword to this new edition, John Thelin assesses the impact that Rudolph's work has had on higher education studies.

The American College and University

First published in 1962, Frederick Rudolph's groundbreaking study, The American College and University, remains one of the most useful and significant works on the history of higher education in America. Bridging the chasm between educational and social history, this book was one of the first to examine developments in higher education in the context of the social, economic, and political forces that were shaping the nation at large. Surveying higher education from the colonial era through the mid-twentieth century, Rudolph explores a multitude of issues from the financing of institutions and the development of curriculum to the education of women and blacks, the rise of college athletics, and the complexities of student life. In his foreword to this new edition, John Thelin assesses the impact that Rudolph's work has had on higher education studies. The new edition also includes a bibliographic essay by Thelin covering significant works in the field that have appeared since the publication of the first edition. At a time when our educational system as a whole is under intense scrutiny, Rudolph's seminal work offers an important historical perspective on the development of higher education in the United States.

The American College and University A History

Evolution of the American Teachers College (1932); Domis E. Plugge: History of Greek Play Production in American Colleges and Universities from 1881 to 1936 (1938); David Potter: Debating in the Colonial Chartered Colleges: An ...

The American College and University  A History

First published in 1962, this book remains one of the most significant works on the history of higher education in America. Bridging the chasm between educational and social history, it was one of the first to examine developments in higher education in the context of the social, economic, and political forces that were shaping the nation at large. Surveying higher education from the colonial era through the mid-20th century, Rudolph explores a multitude of issues from the financing of institutions and the development of curriculum to the education of women and blacks, the rise of college athletics, and the complexities of student life. In his foreword to this edition, John R. Thelin assesses the impact Rudolph’s work has had on higher education studies. The edition also includes a bibliographic essay by Thelin covering significant works in the field that have appeared since the publication of the first edition. “[A]n excellent book... a scholarly book, but one easy to read and always interesting.” — Francis Horn, The New York Times Book Review “A tour de force... The general reader as well as the historian of education will find in it the interesting story of America’s academic life, told with truth and originality” — Saturday Review “[An] important and widely celebrated book... it collects an enormous number of disparate sources... and weaves them into a history of American colleges and universities that is useful, even today, to both the scholar and the general reader... an exceptionally comprehensive book... it traces some three hundred years of the history of American colleges and universities from the 1636 founding of Harvard well into the twentieth century.” — David S. Webster, The Review of Higher Education “[Rudolph] has skillfully organized the results of his comprehensive research; he has a flair for catching the attention with a colorful incident or a memorable quotation; and he writes with a sprightly yet authoritative style. The result is an exceptionally readable account that the scholar will find a profitable addition to his library. The book should appeal, too, to the general reader with a non-professional interest in American higher education, and in how it developed, and why.” — David Madsen, History of Education Quarterly “The American College and University... covers an amazing amount of ground in less than 500 pages of text... a significant contribution.” — Russell E. Miller, American Association of University Professors Bulletin “[A] first-rate contribution to the all-too-meager written history of American education and an example of institutional history at its best.” — Theodore R. Sizer, The New England Quarterly “Frederick Rudolph has chosen to create a vast design stretched across the canvas of several centuries and a broad continent, woven against the military, political, and economic tapestry of a new people creating a new way of life... He has more than succeeded. Covering both minute detail and sweeping developments, Mr. Rudolph makes a significant contribution to historical research by relating the growth of higher education to the totality of the American scene. At the same time he has produced a readable literary effort — set apart from books for popular consumption not by its style, which is well paced and clear, but by its depth of documentation... Rudolph writes with the skill of the novelist in keeping his narrative alive.” — Kenneth R. Williams, The Florida Historical Quarterly “This is a superb account of American higher education from colonial times to the present... The major developments are here, all in perspective, and treated in such a way as to please readers who value clarity, insight, proportion, quiet humor, and literary grace.” — Irwin G. Wyllie, The Business History Review “The American College and University is felicitous writing, eminently readable and frequently entertaining... Rudolph's work makes a significant contribution to educational history and will repay conscientious study.” — Saul Sack, The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography “[Rudolph's book] bears the marks of sound scholarship, and it is written with clarity and urbanity. It will be read with interest by academics and laymen and will probably remain the best one-volume history of its subject for many years.” — Frederick H. Jackson, The Mississippi Valley Historical Review “[T]his is a very capable history of the American college and university and is delightfully written... Both layman and historian can read this book with great profit and great enjoyment.” — Philip Davidson, The Journal of Southern History “[V]ery readable and at times absorbing... [an] illuminating history of the American college.” — Leonard F. Bacigalupo, The Catholic Historical Review “A carefully documented, well-indexed, and, to cap it, entertaining work leaving little doubt that the history of American higher education must be the most delightful story since the beginning of universities in medieval Europe.” — American Behavioral Scientist

Higher Education in Transition

Higher Education in Transition continues to have significance not only for those who work in higher education, but for everyone interested in American ideas, traditions, and social and intellectual history.

Higher Education in Transition

At a time when our colleges and universities face momentous questions of new growth and direction, the republication of Higher Education in Transition is more timely than ever. Beginning with colonial times, the authors trace the development of our college and university system chronologically, in terms of men and institutions. They bring into focus such major areas of concern as curriculum, administration, academic freedom, and student life. They tell their story with a sharp eye for the human values at stake and the issues that will be with us in the future.One gets a sense not only of temporal sequence by centuries and decades but also of unity and continuity by a review of major themes and topics. Rudy's new chapters update developments in higher education during the last twenty years. Higher Education in Transition continues to have significance not only for those who work in higher education, but for everyone interested in American ideas, traditions, and social and intellectual history.

The Art of Hiring in America s Colleges and Universities

Contributors SUE A. BLANSHAN is Dean at Hartford College for Women. ... MILTON GREENBERG is Provost of the American University, Washington, D.C. DONALD W. JUGENHEIMER is Chairman, Department of Communications and Speech at Fairleigh ...

The Art of Hiring in America s Colleges and Universities

Outlines the actual practices of hiring faculty for higher education, and addresses such issues as the role of the college president, deans, and search committees; hiring women and minorities; integrating work and family; and lessons from the business world. For administrators, job seekers, and the people interested in how their tax money is being spent and their children educated. No index. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The American College

The American College


The Invisible Tapestry

The properties of institutional culture are identified, and the way cultural perspectives have been used to describe life in colleges and universities are examined.

The Invisible Tapestry

The properties of institutional culture are identified, and the way cultural perspectives have been used to describe life in colleges and universities are examined. Seven sections cover the following: cultural perspectives (the warrant for the report, organizational rationality, the remaining sections); culture defined and described (toward a definition of culture, properties of culture, levels of culture); intellectual foundations of culture (anthropology, sociology); a framework for analyzing culture in higher education (the external environment, the institution, subcultures, individual actors); threads of institutional culture (historical roots and external influences, academic program, the personnel core, social environment, artifacts, distinctive themes, individual actors); institutional subcultures (faculty subculture, student culture, administrative subcultures); and implications of cultural perspectives (a summary of cultural properties, implications for practice, inquiry into culture in higher education). Techniques of inquiry appropriate for studying culture include observing participants, interviewing key informants, conducting autobiographical interviews, and analyzing documents. By viewing higher education institutions as cultural enterprises, it may be possible to learn how the college experience contributes to divisions of class, race, gender, and age within the institution as well as throughout society, how a college or university relates to its prospective, current, or former students, and how to deal more effectively with conflicts between competing interest groups. Contains over 340 references. (SM)

The American College President 1636 1989

Sontz's bibliography is the first work on this topic in 30 years.

The American College President  1636 1989

Sontz's bibliography is the first work on this topic in 30 years. It includes biographical material on educators that has become available only during the past three decades as well as materials relevant to colonial and 19th-century academic presidencies. The "Review Essay" critically reviews the past and current role of the president and changes in function and perception from 1636 to 1988. Source materials are accessible and relevant; only those presidential writings that pertain directly to issues of education and academic governance are cited.

The Shape and Shaping of the College and University in America

In the early 1800s many American college faculty went to European universities for doctorates, and advanced teaching and research experience. They returned to the New World with different takes on pedagogy, teaching, learning, ...

The Shape and Shaping of the College and University in America

This book presents the issues, controversies, and key players that formed and enabled the American college and university to endure as a critical institution of the nation and society.

Abelard to Apple

In Abelard to Apple, DeMillo argues that these institutions, clinging precariously to a centuries-old model of higher education, are ignoring the social, historical, and economic forces at work in today's world.

Abelard to Apple

How institutions of higher learning can rescue themselves from irrelevance and marginalization in the age of iTunes U and YouTube EDU. The vast majority of American college students attend two thousand or so private and public institutions that might be described as the Middle—reputable educational institutions, but not considered equal to the elite and entrenched upper echelon of the Ivy League and other prestigious schools. Richard DeMillo has a warning for these colleges and universities in the Middle: If you do not change, you are heading for irrelevance and marginalization. In Abelard to Apple, DeMillo argues that these institutions, clinging precariously to a centuries-old model of higher education, are ignoring the social, historical, and economic forces at work in today's world. In the age of iTunes, open source software, and for-profit online universities, there are new rules for higher education. DeMillo, who has spent years in both academia and in industry, explains how higher education arrived at its current parlous state and offers a road map for the twenty-first century. He describes the evolving model for higher education, from European universities based on a medieval model to American land-grant colleges to Apple's iTunes U and MIT's OpenCourseWare. He offers ten rules to help colleges reinvent themselves (including “Don't romanticize your weaknesses”) and argues for a focus on teaching undergraduates. DeMillo's message—for colleges and universities, students, alumni, parents, employers, and politicians—is that any college or university can change course if it defines a compelling value proposition (one not based in “institutional envy” of Harvard and Berkeley) and imagines an institution that delivers it.

The College the University and the Foreign Student

The College  the University and the Foreign Student


The Founding of American Colleges and Universities Before the Civil War with Particular Reference to the Religious Influences Bearing Upon the College Movement

One Permanent College Founded in Association with United Brethren Interests before the Civil War 132 XXII. List of State Universities Founded before the Civil War . . . 167 XXIII. Summary Table of State Universities Founded in ...

The Founding of American Colleges and Universities Before the Civil War  with Particular Reference to the Religious Influences Bearing Upon the College Movement


Wittenberg An American College

The Collegeand the Student, ed. byLawrence E. Dennis and JosephF. Kauffman. Washington, D.C. American Council on Education,1966. ______. The AmericanCollege and University. New York. Knopf and Co., 1962. ______.

Wittenberg  An American College

"Half of all the colleges founded before the Civil War did not survive. Wittenberg did. This is the story of a college on the Ohio frontier that sought to Americanize millions of German immigrants and to Americanize the German Lutheran Church. In spite of that, Wittenberg was caught in the anti-foreign prejudice of “Nativists” who feared the influence of immigrants on American institutions. The school prospered after the Civil War as America embraced German culture from classical music to the Christmas tree. The school again faced prejudice in the anti-German furor of World War I. Simultaneously, this is the story of students and faculty coping with the pressures of a nation going from the poverty of the rural frontier to the wealth of an urban-industrial society and how they and Wittenberg changed."

American Collegiate Populations

The author offers a devastating critique of the two reference works which until now have commanded scholars' attention.

American Collegiate Populations

The past decade has seen American culture deeply divided by debates over social identity, public morality, communal values and freedom of expression. A key focus of these polarizing discussions has been the role of visual arts in public life. In Art Matters, five leading cultural critics and two prominent contemporary artists show the ways that this debate has profoundly reshaped our view of American culture. Lucy Lippard investigates the extraordinary recent transformations in visual art; Michele Wallace takes on high art, popular culture, and African American identity; David Deitcher discusses queer culture and AIDS; Carole S. Vance ponders censorship and sexually explicit imagery; and Lewis Hyde considers democracy and culture. Projects by artists Julie Ault and Andrea Fraser provide a context for these debates. Art Matters also offers a close examination of attempts to develop alternative funding sources for artists, focusing specifically on the influential private foundation Art Matters-a foundation which became an important proponent for new forms of art and for protecting freedom of expression through its funding and advocacy efforts.

American Universities and Colleges

The American Institute of Architects (A I A), 1735 New York Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006 will provide ... Alabama Auburn University, School of Architecture and the Arts; B.Arch. Arizona Arizona State University, College of ...

American Universities and Colleges


The World of the American Student

The World of the American Student


The American College President

The private sector, overall, was more likely to hire presidents from outside higher education. In 1998, 13 percent of private college and university presidents came from outside higher education, compared with just 4 percent of all ...

The American College President


Making Higher Education Christian

The History and Mission of Evangelical Colleges in America Joel A. Carpenter, Kenneth W. Shipps ... “Antebellum College Movement: Reappraisal of Tewksbury's Founding of American Colleges and Universities,” History of Education Quarterly ...

Making Higher Education Christian

This book takes stock of an important but often hidden aspect of American Protestant evangelicalism: its efforts in higher education. The many liberal arts colleges, graduate theological seminaries, and Bible colleges nationwide that serve evangelical traditions and movements have remained nearly invisible to the academic establishment until recently. The essays presented here reflect a maturing community of scholarship focused on the unfinished business of developing a thoroughly Christian approach to contemporary higher education. They offer new theoretical perspectives on the aims and bases of educating, candid assessments of shortcomings in evangelical scholarship, and concrete suggestion for effective approaches to contemporary problems.