The American College Town

... Frank Lloyd , 47 , 80 – 81 writers , 93 , 189 - 91 , 196 - 97 , 201 - 2 , 219 , 221 Williams College , 26 – 27 , 32 , 64 , 74 Williamsburg , Va . , 31 Williamstown , Mass . , 6 , 26 – 27 , 32 , 33 , 74 , 290 Willow Run Laboratories ...

The American College Town

A vivd portrait of a distinctly American phenomenon.

The New American College Town

So, just what makes a college town? In 2004 the Journal of the American Planning Association published a study of the best downtowns in North America.4 The authors asked urban planners from across the United States and Canada what were ...

The New American College Town

Singer, Allison Starer, Wim Wiewel, Eugene L. Zdziarski II

The New American College Town

Singer, Allison Starer, Wim Wiewel, Eugene L. Zdziarski II

The New American College Town

Singer, Allison Starer, Wim Wiewel, Eugene L. Zdziarski II

A Brief History of South Denver University Park

Blake Gumprecht, a former newspaper reporter who is now an associate professor of geography and chair of the University of New Hampshire Department of Geography, recently published a book entitled The American College Town (University ...

A Brief History of South Denver   University Park

University Park was founded in the 1880s when the University of Denver (Colorado Seminary) moved from downtown Denver to land donated by potato farmer Rufus Clark. The University, founded by Methodists, wanted to escape the urban blight of the city and build an oasis for education. Liquor production or consumption was not allowed, and though today the area has many pubs a number of home mortgages to this day contain old covenants forbidding the making or selling of spirits. Around University Park grew the town of South Denver, which was annexed to the city of Denver in the early twentieth century. For many years in the late 1800s the primary employer was the University of Denver, but over time others moved into the area for its attractive homes and well respected schools. The area has traditionally been upper middle class and has enjoyed one of the lowest crime rates in the city. At the geographic center of University Park is Observatory Park, named for the famous Chamberlain Observatory, built in the 1890s and still fully operational with popular public viewing nights. In the early part of the century Colorado Governor Henry Buchtel lived in the park, as did a number of famed early DU faculty such as Ammi Hyde, who beat the freshman boys in an annual foot race well into his 90's. The area boomed after World War II as many from other parts of the country who were stationed in Colorado chose to remain and make it their home. The area has remained prosperous and continues to grow, sharing in the overall success that the Denver metro area has experienced.

The American College Song Book

And so I settled down in that noisy college town , On the Banks of the Old Raritan . : TO Chorus . On the banks of the old Rar - i - tan , my boys , Where old Rut - gers ev - er.more shall म stand , For has she not stood -ince the time ...

The American College Song Book


American Higher Education

colleges as clients high-tech Internet courses and networks that colleges themselves cannot or choose not to develop. Town and Gown: Local Initiatives Colleges and universities have been interdependent with their host communities since ...

American Higher Education

The latest book in the Core Concepts in Higher Education series brings to life issues of governance, organization, teaching and learning, student life, faculty, finances, college sports, public policy, fundraising and innovations in higher education today. Written by renowned author John R. Thelin, each chapter bridges research, theory and practice and discusses a range of institutions – including the often overlooked for-profits, community colleges and minority serving institutions. In the book’s second edition, Thelin analyzes growing trends in American higher education over the last five years, shedding light on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. He covers reconsideration of the rights of student-athletes, provides fresh analysis of the brick-and-mortar campus, and includes a new chapter exploring school admissions, recruitment and retention. Rich end-of-chapter "Additional Readings" and "Questions for Discussion" help engage students in critical thinking. A blend of stories and analysis, this book challenges present and future higher education practitioners to be informed and active participants, capable of improving their institutions.

Party School

THE AMERICAN COLLEGE TOWN just as college campuses vary considerably, so do the communities that host them. ... Whereas some colleges are located in cities or towns that barely acknowledge their presence, other schools are a much more ...

Party School

On the basis of extensive on-site research, Karen G. Weiss offers a case study of crime victimization at an American "party school" that reverberates beyond a single campus. She argues that today's party school--usually a large public university with a big sports program and an active Greek life--represents a unique environment that nurtures and rewards extreme drinking, which in turn increases the risks of victimization and normalizes bad behavior of students who are intoxicated. Weiss shows why so many students voluntarily place themselves at risk, why so few crimes are reported to police, and why victims often shrug off their injuries and other negative consequences as the acceptable cost of admission to a party.

Living on Campus

Blake Gumprecht, “Fraternity Row, the Student Ghetto, and the Faculty Enclave: Characteristic Residential Districts in the American College Town,” Journal of Urban History 32, no. 2 (January 2006): 237. See also Gumprecht, American ...

Living on Campus

An exploration of the architecture of dormitories that exposes deeply held American beliefs about education, youth, and citizenship Every fall on move-in day, parents tearfully bid farewell to their beloved sons and daughters at college dormitories: it is an age-old ritual. The residence hall has come to mark the threshold between childhood and adulthood, housing young people during a transformational time in their lives. Whether a Gothic stone pile, a quaint Colonial box, or a concrete slab, the dormitory is decidedly unhomelike, yet it takes center stage in the dramatic arc of many American families. This richly illustrated book examines the architecture of dormitories in the United States from the eighteenth century to 1968, asking fundamental questions: Why have American educators believed for so long that housing students is essential to educating them? And how has architecture validated that idea? Living on Campus is the first architectural history of this critical building type. Grounded in extensive archival research, Carla Yanni’s study highlights the opinions of architects, professors, and deans, and also includes the voices of students. For centuries, academic leaders in the United States asserted that on-campus living enhanced the moral character of youth; that somewhat dubious claim nonetheless influenced the design and planning of these ubiquitous yet often overlooked campus buildings. Through nuanced architectural analysis and detailed social history, Yanni offers unexpected glimpses into the past: double-loaded corridors (which made surveillance easy but echoed with noise), staircase plans (which prevented roughhousing but offered no communal space), lavish lounges in women’s halls (intended to civilize male visitors), specially designed upholstered benches for courting couples, mixed-gender saunas for students in the radical 1960s, and lazy rivers for the twenty-first century’s stressed-out undergraduates. Against the backdrop of sweeping societal changes, communal living endured because it bolstered networking, if not studying. Housing policies often enabled discrimination according to class, race, and gender, despite the fact that deans envisioned the residence hall as a democratic alternative to the elitist fraternity. Yanni focuses on the dormitory as a place of exclusion as much as a site of fellowship, and considers the uncertain future of residence halls in the age of distance learning.

Universities and Their Cities

American Planning Tradition (MIT Press, 1984), and Blake Gumprecht, The American College Town (University of Massachusetts Press, 2008). Several historical studies focus on specific time periods. Among these are Earl Dudley Ross, ...

Universities and Their Cities

Ultimately, this book is a considered and long overdue look at the symbiotic impact of these two great American institutions: the city and the university.

American Anti Nuclear Activism 1975 1990

The American College Town. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2008. Gusterson, Hugh. Nuclear Rites:A Weapons Laboratory at the End of the Cold War. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996. Hall, Simon. American ...

American Anti Nuclear Activism  1975 1990

Looking at national peace organizations alongside lesser-known protest collectives, this book argues that anti-nuclear activists encountered familiar challenges common to other social movements of the late twentieth century.

Flat World Fiction

She functions as part of what Blake Gumprecht in The American College Town identifies as a definitive feature of college towns: a “transient” population (10). She never inhabits the town in a permanent, meaningful, or real sense.

Flat World Fiction

Flat-World Fiction analyzes representations of digital technology and the social and ethical concerns it creates in mainstream literary American fiction and fiction written about the United States in the first two decades of the twenty-first century. In this period, authors such as Don DeLillo, Jennifer Egan, Dave Eggers, Joshua Ferris, Jonathan Safran Foer, Mohsin Hamid, Thomas Pynchon, Kristen Roupenian, Gary Shteyngart, and Zadie Smith found themselves not only implicated in the developing digital world of flat screens but also threatened by it, while simultaneously attempting to critique it. As a result, their texts explore how human relationships with digital devices and media transform human identity and human relationships with one another, history, divinity, capitalism, and nationality. Liliana M. Naydan walks us through these complex relationships, revealing how authors show through their fiction that technology is political. In the process, these authors complement and expand on work by historians, philosophers, and social scientists, creating accessible, literary road maps to our digital future.

Historic Towns of New England

To study the American college town at its best, unsullied by the grime of industrialism and the temptations and conventionalities of city life, one must go to hill-towns like Amherst and Williamstown, Massachusetts, or Hanover, ...

Historic Towns of New England


American College Fraternities

A Descriptive Analysis of the Society System in the Colleges of the United States, with a Detailed Account of Each Fraternity William Raimond ... It possesses a lodge in the college town , and has a Chapter House fund accumulating .

American College Fraternities


Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers

The effect of college location on migration of college-educated labor. Journal ofEconometrics 121, 125–142. Gumprecht, B. (2005). Town vs. gown: City-university relations in the American college town. Department of Geography, University ...

Universities and Colleges as Economic Drivers

Comprehensive examination of the relationship between higher education, state government, and economic development.

A Truthful Impression of the Country

British and American Travel Writing in China, 1880-1949 Nicholas J. Clifford, Nicholas Rowland Clifford, Nick Clifford ... It was an atmosphere one might expect to find in an American college town that prided itself upon being very ...

 A Truthful Impression of the Country

An examination of the writings of travelers to China in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries

The Michigan Alumnus

Huron , Ohio A Call to Collegians For a book on the American college town , I would appreciate hearing from anyone with insights or information relevant to the evolution and contemporary character of Ann Arbor as a college town .

The Michigan Alumnus

In volumes1-8: the final number consists of the Commencement annual.

The Bohemian South

Brown, Party Out of Bounds, 39; Gumprecht, The American College Town, 189–226; Shank, Dissonant Identities; Becker, Art Worlds; Bennett and Peterson, Music Scenes; Bennett, Popular Music and Youth Culture; Thornton, Club Cultures; Cruz, ...

The Bohemian South

From the southern influence on nineteenth-century New York to the musical legacy of late-twentieth-century Athens, Georgia, to the cutting-edge cuisines of twenty-first-century Asheville, North Carolina, the bohemian South has long contested traditional views of the region. Yet, even as the fruits of this creative South have famously been celebrated, exported, and expropriated, the region long was labeled a cultural backwater. This timely and illuminating collection uses bohemia as a novel lens for reconsidering more traditional views of the South. Exploring wide-ranging locales, such as Athens, Austin, Black Mountain College, Knoxville, Memphis, New Orleans, and North Carolina's Research Triangle, each essay challenges popular interpretations of the South, while highlighting important bohemian sub- and countercultures. The Bohemian South provides an important perspective in the New South as an epicenter for progress, innovation, and experimentation. Contributors include Scott Barretta, Shawn Chandler Bingham, Jaime Cantrell, Jon Horne Carter, Alex Sayf Cummings, Lindsey A. Freeman, Grace E. Hale, Joanna Levin, Joshua Long, Daniel S. Margolies, Chris Offutt, Zandria F. Robinson, Allen Shelton, Daniel Cross Turner, Zackary Vernon, and Edward Whitley.

How Places Make Us

the american college town.” Geographical Review 93 (1): 51–80. ———. 2010. The American College Town. amherst: university of Massachusetts press. Habermas, Jurgen. (1962) 1989. The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere.

How Places Make Us

Maybe we’ve had enough of studies of gay men and urban centers, tracing out the similarities from one place to the next. Japonica Brown-Saracino bucks the trend, giving us the first in-depth study of lesbians (and bisexual/queer women more generally), showing how four contrasting communal cultures have shaped their identity. Individual lesbian residents shape the culture of sexual identity they embrace, based at the same time on the prevailing culture in the city they inhabit. And the consequence is that the same woman will develop a different version of lesbian identity depending on which of the four cities she moves into. Those cities are: Ithaca, New York; San Luis Obispo, California; Greenfield, Massachusetts; and Portland, Maine. She identifies them in the book (a rare move for ethnographers), thus insuring a coast-to-coast readership, with lots of debate. This book advances, in almost equal measure, sexuality and gender studies, theories of identity, theories of place, and urban sociology. Each city has its own loose bundles or connections between residents, whether it’s the taste-based ties in Ithaca, or the ties in San Luis Obispo that cut across demographics, or the conversations about identity that prevail in Portland, or the emphasis Greenfield on other dimensions of the self (e.g., profession, politics, or life stage, such as motherhood). Along the way, Brown-Saracino poses a set of questions from urban sociology about migration, residential choice, and community change processes that students of cities rarely apply to sexual minority populations.

Design First

... dinner party in Fayetteville, Arkansas, a pleasant American college town of 60 000 people in the Ozark Mountains. Sharing the table were the town's mayor, planning officers from town hall, local architects, developers, and spouses.

Design First

Well-grounded in the history and theory of Anglo-American urbanism, this illustrated textbook sets out objectives, policies and design principles for planning new communities and redeveloping existing urban neighborhoods. Drawing from their extensive experience, the authors explain how better plans (and consequently better places) can be created by applying the three-dimensional principles of urban design and physical place-making to planning problems. Design First uses case studies from the authors’ own professional projects to demonstrate how theory can be turned into effective practice, using concepts of traditional urban form to resolve contemporary planning and design issues in American communities. The book is aimed at architects, planners, developers, planning commissioners, elected officials and citizens -- and, importantly, students of architecture and planning -- with the objective of reintegrating three-dimensional design firmly back into planning practice.

ITJEMAST 11 4 2020

The Psychology of Place. London: Architectural Press. Gumprecht, B. (2003). The American College Town. Journal of The Geographical Review, 93(1), 51-80. Gumprecht, B. (2007). The Campus as A Public Space in the American College Town.

ITJEMAST 11 4  2020

International Transaction Journal of Engineering, Management, & Applied Sciences & Technologies publishes a wide spectrum of research and technical articles as well as reviews, experiments, experiences, modelings, simulations, designs, and innovations from engineering, sciences, life sciences, and related disciplines as well as interdisciplinary/cross-disciplinary/multidisciplinary subjects. Original work is required. Article submitted must not be under consideration of other publishers for publications.