American Puritan Imagination

I The American Puritan Imagination : an Introduction The New England colonists took pride in the adversities of their locale . America had been Satan's territory , after all , from time immemorial ; it was probably the world's last ...

American Puritan Imagination

The major themes, leading exponents, style, and genres of early American literature are investigated

The Puritan Imagination

That he did not state directly or indirectly any shift from him should reflect that Baxter stood in Hall's line of influence, even though the latter became more widely known and loved in England and in the American colonies.

The Puritan Imagination

This book seeks to add a needed introduction to a way of meditation used among early modern English Protestants, influenced by Bishop Joseph Hall. Furthermore, the major role that Hall had in his Arte of Divine Mediation on late-seventeenth-century Protestant spirituality went beyond the practice of meditation and established a positive claim on the role of the imagination in shaping souls, well into the modern period. Within this context, the questions related to ancient understandings of faith and the interrelationship of divine revelation are discussed with fresh insights for our own times. If a revival of interest emerges again in Hall's work, it would be a compelling and fresh impetus to reclaim the broken imagination evident in many parts of the Western Church.

The American Puritan Elegy

Puritanism in America: New Culture in a New Wbrld. New York: Viking, 1973“The Literary Consequences of Puritanism.” In The American Puritan Imagination: Essays in Revaluation. Ed. Sacvan Bercovitch. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press ...

The American Puritan Elegy

Jeffrey Hammond's study takes an anthropological approach to the most popular form of poetry in early New England - the funeral elegy. Hammond reconstructs the historical, theological and cultural contexts of these poems to demonstrate how they responded to a specific process of mourning defined by Puritan views on death and grief. The elegies emerge, he argues not as 'poems' to be read and appreciated in a post-romantic sense, but as performative scripts that consoled readers by shaping their experience of loss in accordance with theological expectation. Read in the framework of their own time and place, the elegies shed light on the emotional dimension of Puritanism and the important role of ritual in Puritan culture. Hammond's book reassesses a body of poems whose importance on their own time has been obscured by almost total neglect in ours. It represents the first full-length study of its kind in English.

A History of American Puritan Literature

Sacvan Bercovitch, “Introduction,” in The American Puritan Imagination: Essays in Revaluation, ed. Sacvan Bercovitch (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1974), 12. In his first major monograph, he explained, “The New England Puritans ...

A History of American Puritan Literature

For generations, scholars have imagined American puritans as religious enthusiasts, fleeing persecution, finding refuge in Massachusetts, and founding “America.” The puritans have been read as a product of New England and the origin of American exceptionalism. This History challenges the usual understanding of American puritans, offering new ways of reading their history and their literary culture. Together, an international team of authors make clear that puritan America cannot be thought of apart from Native America, and that its literature is also grounded in Britain, Europe, North America, the Caribbean, and networks that spanned the globe. Each chapter focuses on a single place, method, idea, or context to read familiar texts anew and to introduce forgotten or neglected voices and writings. A History of American Puritan Literature is a collaborative effort to create not a singular literary history, but a series of interlocked new histories of American puritan literature.

Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination

American memory, “what people believe to be true about their past is usually more important in determining their behavior and responses than truth itself,” and this makes memory itself an influential part of the historical record, ...

Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination

The Puritans of popular memory are dour figures, characterized by humorless toil at best and witch trials at worst. “Puritan” is an insult reserved for prudes, prigs, or oppressors. Antebellum American abolitionists, however, would be shocked to hear this. They fervently embraced the idea that Puritans were in fact pioneers of revolutionary dissent and invoked their name and ideas as part of their antislavery crusade. Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination reveals how the leaders of the nineteenth-century abolitionist movement—from landmark figures like Ralph Waldo Emerson to scores of lesser-known writers and orators—drew upon the Puritan tradition to shape their politics and personae. In a striking instance of selective memory, reimagined aspects of Puritan history proved to be potent catalysts for abolitionist minds. Black writers lauded slave rebels as new Puritan soldiers, female antislavery militias in Kansas were cast as modern Pilgrims, and a direct lineage of radical democracy was traced from these early New Englanders through the American and French Revolutions to the abolitionist movement, deemed a “Second Reformation” by some. Kenyon Gradert recovers a striking influence on abolitionism and recasts our understanding of puritanism, often seen as a strictly conservative ideology, averse to the worldly rebellion demanded by abolitionists.

Worldly Saints

64Good starting points on the Puritan imagination include the following : Sacvan Bercovitch , The American Puritan Imagination ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1974 ) ; Barbara K. Lewalski , Protestant Poetics and the ...

Worldly Saints

Dr.Ryken's presentation of the Puritan view and style of life is perceptive and accurate. He allows them to speak for themselves on topics ranging from"Church and Worship" to "Money" and "Marriage and Sex". While criticizing the Puritans for their faults, the author paints a sympathetic portrait of them.

The Puritan Origins of American Sex

See also American Puritan Imagination: Essays in Revaluation, ed. Sacvan Bercovitch (Cambridge and London: Cambridge University Press, 1974); Mason I. Lowance Ir., The Language of Canaan: Metaphor and Symbol in New England from the ...

The Puritan Origins of American Sex

From witch trials to pickaxe murderers, from brothels to convents, and from slavery to Toni Morrison's Paradise, these essays provide fascinating and provocative insights into our sexual and religious conventions and beliefs.

Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England

For studies of the continuing presence of the Puritan or Christian errand myth in the American imagination that are helpful in any study of the Puritan mind, see Loren Baritz, City on a Hill, A History of Ideas and Myths in America (New ...

Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England

For years, scholars have attempted to understand the powerful hold that the sermon had upon the imagination of New England Puritans. In this book Emory Elliott puts forth a complex and striking thesis: that Puritan religious literature provided the myths and metaphors that helped the people to express their deepest doubts and fears, feelings created by their particular cultural situation and aroused by the crucial social events of seventeenth-century America. In his early chapters, the author defines the psychological needs of the second- and third-generation Puritans, arguing that these needs arose from the generational conflict between the founders and their children and from the methods of child rearing and religious education employed in Puritan New England. In the later chapters, he reveals how the ministers responded to the crisis in their society by reshaping theology and constructing in their sermons a religious language that helped to fulfill the most urgent psychological needs of the people. Originally published in 1975. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Thornton Wilder and the Puritan Narrative Tradition

The American Puritan Imagination: Essays in Revaluation. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1974. ———, ed. Typology and Early American Literature. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1972. Berryman, Charles.

Thornton Wilder and the Puritan Narrative Tradition

"Fresh examination of the works of Thornton Wilder emphasizing continuities in American literature from the seventeenth through twentieth centuries. Sees Wilder as a literary descendant of Edward Taylor who drew from the Puritan worldview and tradition. Includes indepth readings of Shadow of a Doubt, The Trumpet Shall Sound, and others"--Provided by publisher.

The Puritans in America

... The American Colonies in the Eighteenth Century, 1689—176) (Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1969); and those included in Sacvan Bercovitch, ed., The American Puritan Imagination: Essays in Revaluation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press ...

The Puritans in America

Exiled from England, the Puritans settled in what Cromwell called "a poor, cold, and useless" place--where they created a body of ideas and aspirations that were essential in the shaping of American religion, politics, and culture. In a felicitous blend of documents and narrative Heimert and Delbanco recapture the sweep and restless change of Puritan thought from its incipient Americanism through its dominance in New England society to its fragmentation in the face of dissent from within and without.

From Puritanism to Postmodernism

Critics blamed the Puritan heritage for much that seemed to limit American writing: its heavily allegorizing ... revival of interest in the Puritan heritage has grown to the point of arguing its centrality for the American imagination.

From Puritanism to Postmodernism

Widely acknowledged as a contemporary classic that has introduced thousands of readers to American literature, From Puritanism to Postmodernism: A History of American Literature brilliantly charts the fascinating story of American literature from the Puritan legacy to the advent of postmodernism. From realism and romanticism to modernism and postmodernism it examines and reflects on the work of a rich panoply of writers, including Poe, Melville, Fitzgerald, Pound, Wallace Stevens, Gwendolyn Brooks and Thomas Pynchon. Characterised throughout by a vibrant and engaging style it is a superb introduction to American literature, placing it thoughtfully in its rich social, ideological and historical context. A tour de force of both literary and historical writing, this Routledge Classics edition includes a new preface by co-author Richard Ruland, a new foreword by Linda Wagner-Martin and a fascinating interview with Richard Ruland, in which he reflects on the nature of American fiction and his collaboration with Malclolm Bradbury. It is published here for the first time.

Writing North America in the Seventeenth Century

52 C.Tichi , Spiritual Biography ' , in S. Bercovitch ed . , The American Puritan Imagination ( Cambridge , 1974 ) , p . 64 . America and Renaissance Meteorology Classical literature familiarized readers with debates 52 Writing North ...

Writing North America in the Seventeenth Century

Examining a range of seventeenth century literature, including travel narratives, promotional literature, plays, poetry and journals, this book examines the ways in which the geography and nature of the new colonies of North America were represented, both by the settlers themselves and commentators in Renaissance England. This is a valuable addition to literature of colonial history, transatlantic history, and the cultural world of early modern England.

American Literature s Aesthetic Dimensions

... the visionary and symbolic power of the American Puritan imagination.”16 The collection of essays Bercovitch edited with Myra Jehlen, mentioned earlier, Ideology and Classic American Literature, is often cited as a watershed moment, ...

American Literature s Aesthetic Dimensions

These diverse essays recast the place of aesthetics in production & consumption of American literature. Contributors showcase the interpretive possibilities available to those who bring politics, culture, ideology, & conceptions of identity into their critiques, combining close readings of individual works & authors with theoretical discussions.

The Turn Around Religion in America

“invisible domain” of religion visible in American writing.1 To be sure, we've always known that religion was out there, not only in churches, ... He refused to see Puritanism as the muzzle on the Puritans' literary imaginations.

The Turn Around Religion in America

Playing on the frequently used metaphors of the 'turn toward' or 'turn back' in scholarship on religion, The Turn Around Religion in America offers a model of religion that moves in a reciprocal relationship between these two poles. In particular, this volume dedicates itself to a reading of religion and of religious meaning that cannot be reduced to history or ideology on the one hand or to truth or spirit on the other, but is rather the product of the constant play between the historical particulars that manifest beliefs and the beliefs that take shape through them. Taking as their point of departure the foundational scholarship of Sacvan Bercovitch, the contributors locate the universal in the ongoing and particularized attempts of American authors from the seventeenth century forward to get it - whatever that 'it' might be - right. Examining authors as diverse as Pietro di Donato, Herman Melville, Miguel Algarin, Edward Taylor, Mark Twain, Robert Keayne, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paule Marshall, Stephen Crane, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Joseph B. Soloveitchik, among many others-and a host of genres, from novels and poetry to sermons, philosophy, history, journalism, photography, theater, and cinema-the essays call for a discussion of religion's powers that does not seek to explain them as much as put them into conversation with each other. Central to this project is Bercovitch's emphasis on the rhetoric, ritual, typology, and symbology of religion and his recognition that with each aesthetic enactment of religion's power, we learn something new.

Fictional Worlds and the Moral Imagination

contemporary American horror texts. In particular, we will focus on Robert Eggers' 2015 film The Witch, a work whose visual aesthetic is heavily influenced by the Puritan construction of nature as Sublime. In doing so, we will explicate ...

Fictional Worlds and the Moral Imagination

This edited collection investigates the kinds of moral reflection we can undertake within the imaginative worlds of literature. In philosophical contexts of ethical inquiry we can too easily forget that literary experience can play an important role in the cultivation of our ethical sensibilities. Because our ethical lives are conducted in the real world, fictional representations of this world can appear removed from ethical contemplation. However, as this stimulating volume shows, the dichotomy between fact and fiction cannot be so easily categorised. Moral perception, moral sensitivity, and ethical understanding more broadly, may all be developed in a unique way through our imaginative life in fiction. Moral quandaries are often presented in literature in ways more linguistically precise and descriptively complete than the ones we encounter in life, whilst simultaneously offering space for contemplation. The twelve original chapters in this volume examine literary texts – including theatre and film – in this light, and taken together they show how serious reflection within fictional worlds can lead to a depth of humane insight. The topics explored include: the subtle ways that knowledge can function as a virtue; issues concerning our relations to and understanding of each other; the complex intertwining of virtues and vices in the modern world; and the importance of bringing to light and reconsidering ethical presuppositions. With an appreciation of the importance of richly contextualized particularity and the power of descriptive acuity, the volume maps out the territory that philosophical reflection and literary engagement share.

Beyond Progress

31-33 ; Bercovitch , " The American Puritan Imagination : An Introduction , " in Bercovitch , ed . , The American ... of the ancient Hebrew rabbis had a profound influence on Christians , including the Puritans , after the Reformation .

Beyond Progress

In this dynamic portrait of the human community as it enters the twenty-first century, Hugh De Santis argues that in a world of dwindling resources, economic inequality, and unremitting violence, the belief in endless progress can no longer be sustained. Explaining that we have arrived at a great historic divide, De Santis asserts that the old modern order is giving way to an age of "mutualism." He draws on world history and the study of international relations to explore the emerging future, in which new forms of social and political identity and regional associations and alignments will be needed to solve global problems. Demonstrating that mutualism will require a dramatic change in the way states, international institutions, corporations, and local communities interact, De Santis argues that this transformation will be especially difficult for the United States, which will have to abandon its exceptionalist identity and rejoin a world it can no longer escape.

John Eliot s Puritan Ministry to New England Indians

City on a Hill: A History of Ideas and Myths in America. ... Beeke, Joel R. Puritan Reformed Spirituality: A Practical Theological Study from Our Reformed and Puritan Heritage ... The American Puritan Imagination: Essays in Revaluation.

John Eliot s Puritan Ministry to New England  Indians

John Eliot (1604–90) has been called “the apostle to the Indians.” This book looks at Eliot not from the perspective of modern Protestant “mission” studies (the approach mainly adopted by previous research) but in the historical and theological context of seventeenth-century puritanism. Drawing on recent research on migration to New England, the book argues that Eliot, like many other migrants, went to New England primarily in search of a safe haven to practice pure reformed Christianity, not to convert Indians. Eliot’s Indian ministry started from a fundamental concern for the conversion of the unconverted, which he derived from his experience of the puritan movement in England. Consequently, for Eliot, the notion of New England Indian “mission” was essentially conversion-oriented, Word-centered, and pastorally focused, and (in common with the broader aims of New England churches) pursued a pure reformed Christianity. Eliot hoped to achieve this through the establishment of Praying Towns organized on a biblical model—where preaching, pastoral care, and the practice of piety could lead to conversion—leading to the formation of Indian churches composed of “sincere converts.”

The Farm Novel in North America

The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays. ... The Midwestern Pastoral: Place and Landscape in Lit- erature of the American Heartland. ... In The American Puritan Imagination: Essays in Revaluation, edited by Sacvan Bercovitch, 1–16.

The Farm Novel in North America

Provides the first history of the North American farm novel, a genre which includes John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, Sheila Watson's The Double Hook, and Louis Hémon's Maria Chapdelaine.

Puritans Behaving Badly

Gender, Punishment, and Religion in Early America Monica D. Fitzgerald. Whiting, John. ... The Apologia of Robert Keayne: The Self-Portrait of a Puritan Merchant. ... The American Puritan Imagination: Essays in Revaluation.

Puritans Behaving Badly

Tracing the first three generations in Puritan New England, this book explores changes in language, gender expectations, and religious identities for men and women. The book argues that laypeople shaped gender conventions by challenging the ideas of ministers and rectifying more traditional ideas of masculinity and femininity. Although Puritan's emphasis on spiritual equality had the opportunity to radically alter gender roles, in daily practice laymen censured men and women differently – punishing men for public behavior that threatened the peace of their communities, and women for private sins that allegedly revealed their spiritual corruption. In order to retain their public masculine identity, men altered the original mission of Puritanism, infusing gender into the construction of religious ideas about public service, the creation of the individual, and the gendering of separate spheres. With these practices, Puritans transformed their 'errand into the wilderness' and the normative Puritan became female.