The Anglo Saxon Chancery

An exploration of Anglo-Saxon charters, bringing out their complexity and highlighting a range of broad implications.

The Anglo Saxon Chancery

An exploration of Anglo-Saxon charters, bringing out their complexity and highlighting a range of broad implications.

Anglo Saxon Kingship and Political Power

'Review: “The Cult of Kingship in Anglo-Saxon England: The Transition from Paganism to Christianity” by William A. Chaney', Speculum 47 (1972), ... 'The Anglo-Saxon Chancery: From the Diploma to the Writ', in Ranger, Prisca Munimenta, ...

Anglo Saxon Kingship and Political Power

Works on Anglo-Saxon kingship often take as their starting point the line from Beowulf: ‘that was a good king’. This monograph, however, explores what it means to be a king, and how kings defined their own kingship in opposition to other powers. Kings derived their royal power from a divine source, which led to conflicts between the interpreters of the divine will (the episcopate) and the individual wielding power (the king). Demonstrating how Anglo-Saxon kings were able to manipulate political ideologies to increase their own authority, this book explores the unique way in which Anglo-Saxon kings understood the source and nature of their power, and of their own authority.

A New Law Dictionary and Institute of the Whole Law

CHANCERY — continued. the Lord Chancellor, Lord Keeper, &c, in his proceedings and judgments, ... In Anglo-Saxon times, this species of evidence, so far as it regarded the parlies CHARACTER, EVIDENCE AS TO -continued. themselves to an ...

A New Law Dictionary and Institute of the Whole Law


Cnut the Great

95–112 Snook, B., The Anglo-Saxon Chancery: The History, Language and Production of Anglo-Saxon Charters from Alfred to Edgar, Boydell, Woodbridge, 2015 Sprockel, C., The Language of the Parker Chronicle. Vol.

Cnut the Great

A seminal biography of the underappreciated eleventh-century Scandinavian warlord-turned-Anglo-Saxon monarch who united the English and Danish crowns to forge a North Sea empire Historian Timothy Bolton offers a fascinating reappraisal of one of the most misunderstood of the Anglo-Saxon kings: Cnut, the powerful Danish warlord who conquered England and created a North Sea empire in the eleventh century. This seminal biography draws from a wealth of written and archaeological sources to provide the most detailed accounting to date of the life and accomplishments of a remarkable figure in European history, a forward-thinking warrior-turned-statesman who created a new Anglo-Danish regime through designed internationalism.

An Ald Reht

Essays on Anglo-Saxon Law Carole Hough. the use of the third person rather than the first, and some unusual inclusions in ... 49 Chaplais, 'The Origin and Authenticity'; P. Chaplais, 'The Anglo-Saxon Chancery: From the Diploma to the ...

 An Ald Reht

This volume brings together thirteen essays on aspects of the legal system of Anglo-Saxon England. They represent a programme of research carried out over the last twenty years, offering important insights into the operation of English law from its beginnings in the sixth century through to its preservation in manuscripts dating from the tenth to early twelfth centuries. Part I begins with an overview of the legal corpus, followed by a discussion of the relationship between secular and ecclesiastical law, and an examination of seventh-century legislation as evidence for the status of women. Part II presents revisionist interpretations of individual laws from the early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of Kent and Wessex, and Part III focuses on the manuscript evidence. The collection will be of interest to Anglo-Saxon historians, linguists and palaeographers, as well as to academics and postgraduate students in the wider fields of medieval studies and the history of English law.

Routledge Revivals

Oxford: BAR, 1980; Richards, J.D. The Significance of Form and Decoration of Anglo-Saxon Cremation Urns. BAR Brit. Ser. 166. ... See also Archaeology; Sutton Hoo Chancellor and Chancery The origins of the medieval chancery are found in ...

Routledge Revivals

First published in 1998, this valuable reference work offers concise, expert answers to questions on all aspects of life and culture in Medieval England, including art, architecture, law, literature, kings, women, music, commerce, technology, warfare and religion. This wide-ranging text encompasses English social, cultural, and political life from the Anglo-Saxon invasions in the fifth century to the turn of the sixteenth century, as well as its ties to the Celtic world of Wales, Scotland and Ireland, the French and Anglo-Norman world of the Continent and the Viking and Scandinavian world of the North Sea. A range of topics are discussed from Sedulius to Skelton, from Wulfstan of York to Reginald Pecock, from Pictish art to Gothic sculpture and from the Vikings to the Black Death. A subject and name index makes it easy to locate information and bibliographies direct users to essential primary and secondary sources as well as key scholarship. With more than 700 entries by over 300 international scholars, this work provides a detailed portrait of the English Middle Ages and will be of great value to students and scholars studying Medieval history in England and Europe, as well as non-specialist readers.

The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain Volume 1 c 400 1100

1933: TheExeter Book ofOld English Poetry (London) Chaplais, P. 1973a: 'The AngloSaxon chancery: from the diploma to the writ', in Prisca Munimenta: Studies in Archival and Administrative History presented toDr. A. E. J. Hollaender, ed.

The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain  Volume 1  c 400   1100

This is the first comprehensive survey of the history of the book in Britain from Roman through Anglo-Saxon to early Norman times. The expert contributions explore the physical form of books, including their codicology, script and decoration, examine the circulation and exchange of manuscripts and texts between England, Ireland, the Celtic realms and the Continent, discuss the production, presentation and use of different classes of texts, ranging from fine service books to functional schoolbooks, and evaluate the libraries that can be associated with particular individuals and institutions. The result is an authoritative account of the first millennium of the history of books, manuscript-making, and literary culture in Britain which, intimately linked to its cultural contexts, sheds vital light on broader patterns of political, ecclesiastical and cultural history extending from the period of the Vindolanda writing tablets through the age of Bede and Alcuin to the time of the Domesday Book.

Anglo Saxon Myths State and Church 400 1066

... the memory of those present in the court, the last evidence for a royal 'chancery' in the Anglo-Saxon period disappears. Doubtless one of the members of the king's household had custody of the royal seal, which from Edward the ...

Anglo Saxon Myths  State and Church  400 1066

In this collection of essays Nicholas Brooks explores some of the earliest and most problematic sources, both written and archaeological, for early English history. In his hands, the structure and functions of Anglo-Saxon origin stories and charters (whether authentic or forged) illuminate English political and social structures, as well as ecclesiastical, urban and rural landscapes. Together with already published essays, this work includes an account of the developments in the study of Anglo-Saxon charters over the last 20 years.

Equity Stirring

It is true that the Anglo-Saxons had their own methods for devolving land directly on nonheirs,170 but even if the ... unlikely that Roman legal or Roman ecclesiastical notions of trust had no influence on the English chancery idea.

Equity Stirring

Sir Frederick Pollock wrote that 'English-speaking lawyers ...have specialised the name of Equity'. It is typical for legal textbooks on the law of equity to acknowledge the diverse ways in which the word 'equity' is used and then to focus on the legal sense of the word to the exclusion of all others. There may be a professional responsibility on textbook writers to do just that. If so, there is a counterpart responsibility to read the law imaginatively and to read what non-lawyers have said of equity with an open mind. This book is an exploration of the meaning of equity as artists and thinkers have portrayed it within the law and without. Watt finds in law and literature an equity that is necessary to good life and good law but which does not require us to subscribe to a moral or 'natural law' ideal. It is an equity that takes a principled and practical stand against rigid formalism and unthinking routine in law and life, and so provides timely resistance to current forces of extremism and entitlement culture. The project is an educational one in the true etymological sense of leading the reader out into new territory. The book will provide the legal scholar with deep insight into the rhetorical, literary and historical foundations of the idea of equity in law, and it will provide the law student with a cultural history of, and an imaginative introduction to, the technical law of equity and trusts. Scholars and students of such disciplines as literature, classics, history, theology, theatre and rhetoric will discover new insights into the art of equity in the law and beyond. Along the way, Watt offers a new theory on the naming of Dickens' chancery case Jarndyce and Jarndyce and suggests a new connection between Shakespeare and the origin of equity in modern law. 'This beautiful book, deeply learned in the branch of jurisprudence we call equity and deeply engaged with the western literary tradition, gives new life to equity in the legal sense by connecting it with equity in the larger sense: as it is defined both in ordinary language and experience and by great writers, especially Dickens and Shakespeare. Equity Stirring transforms our sense of what equity is and can be and demonstrates in a new and graceful way the importance of connecting law with other arts of mind and language.' James Boyd White, author of Living Speech: Resisting the Empire of Force 'Equity Stirring' is a fine example of interdisciplinary legal scholarship at its best. Watt has managed to produce a book that is fresh and innovative, and thoroughly accessible. Deploying a range of familiar, and not so familiar, texts from across the humanities, Watt has presented a fascinating historical and literary commentary on the evolution of modern ideas of justice and equity. Ian Ward, Professor of Law at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. "this is an important, compendious, and thought-provoking work that should be on the shelves of everyone interested in equity studies." Mark Fortier, Law and Literature "there is much of interest to the legal historian...the book's insights and erudition did engage this rather sceptical reader, who would like to believe that equity could achieve justice, but fears rather that it can only be as fair as the court dispensing it." Rosemary Auchmuty, The Journal of Legal History "With luck, Equity Stirring will stir...taxonomic positivists from their culture of entitlement, waking them to the possibility that law and justice do not form the perfect quadration". Nick Piska, Social & Legal Studies "a highly imaginative, original and refreshing foray into the legal and ethical import of concepts too often thought to be difficult, archaic and obscure...Watt gives us a way into the subject which is forceful in its imaginative reach and its ethical import..." David Gurnham, Law, Culture and the Humanities

A History of Lay Judges

Judicial commissions: for appointment of justices of the peace, 137-138; for arbitration in Chancery, 164-165; ... 226-227, 248-253; validity of manorial by-laws, 281-283 Local government, English: Anglo- Saxon forms, 194; ...

A History of Lay Judges

Dawson, John P. A History of Lay Judges. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1960. viii, [2], 310 pp. Reprinted 1999 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 98-50812. ISBN 1-886363-69-2. Cloth. $75. * An analysis of the divergent legal systems in England, France, Germany and Rome showing the relationship of the courts to the community, the legal structure and political organizations. The work examines the evolution of medieval French and German courts from the Roman canonist system. This study also explores the role of the local courts in England and examines in detail the workings and influence of a typical manor court, Redgrave, in Suffolk, England, (which was owned by Sir Nicholas Bacon, the father of Sir Francis Bacon) for the period up to 1711. Extensive notes, indexed. Scholars interested in the roots of the modern political structures in Europe will find this work of supreme benefit.

Charters of Malmesbury Abbey

63-87 ) P. Chaplais , ' The Royal Anglo - Saxon " Chancery ” of the Tenth Century Revisited ' , Studies in Medieval History presented to R.H.C. Davis , ed . H. Mayr - Harting and R.I. Moore ( London , 1985 ) , pp .

Charters of Malmesbury Abbey

Malmesbury Abbey was one of the few English minsters which had a continuous existence from the seventh to the sixteenth century, and the Malmesbury archive is a particularly important witness to the history of Wessex and the West Saxon church in the pre-Viking period. More than half of the surviving charters purport to date from the seventh and eighth centuries, many of them directly associated with Malmesbury's most celebrated abbot, the scholar and poet Aldhelm. This volume is the first scholarly edition of Malmesbury's pre-Conquest charters. The Malmesbury archive poses a particularly difficult editorial challenge, since the manuscripts are generally late and the abbey's scribes were prone to forgery and the 'improvement' of their muniments. Although the abbey had its own celebrated post-Conquest historian in William of Malmesbury, regrettably little detailed information has survived about the early history of the monastery. Nevertheless, analysis of the charters has made it possible to build up a fairly coherent picture of Malmesbury's development in the first four centuries of its existence. This volume provides an important background to William of Malmesbury's De gestis pontificorum Anglorum, and includes significant new material for the study of William's use of historical documents. Charters of Malmesbury Abbey is comprised of editions of thirty-five charters and also a small group of separate boundary surveys, with expert detailed commentaries on their historical and topographical importance. The charters are prefaced by a lengthy introduction which presents a new synthesis of the history of the abbey and an extensive bibliography.

The Clergy in the Medieval World

One royal scribe can be identified: Ælfwine, the beneficiary of a charter of Æthelred the Unready in 984, but we do not have evidence for what he wrote.42 It has been fiercely argued whether or not there was 'an AngloSaxon chancery'.43 ...

The Clergy in the Medieval World

The first broad-ranging social history in English of the medieval secular clergy.

Kingship and Consent in Anglo Saxon England 871 978

1X 'The Laws of Cnut and the History ofAnglo—Saxon Royal Promises' (1981), repr. in and cited from her Gender, ... p. xii The Latin Charters oftheAngloSaxon Period (Oxford, 1955) Stevenson, W H., 'The AngloSaxon Chancery', ...

Kingship and Consent in Anglo Saxon England  871 978

This is an engaging new study of how kingship and royal government operated in the late Anglo-Saxon period.

England s Mail

19 Stenton, Anglo-Saxon England, pp.174–5. 20 Chaplais, Letter from Bishop Waldhere; see Figure 1.5. 21 Douglas, English Historical Documents; vol. 1 discusses these early letters. 22 Chaplais, The Royal Anglo-Saxon Chancery of the 10th ...

England s Mail

From Roman times until the twentieth century, much of the administration of England was carried out through sending letters. In this richly researched and illustrated volume, Philip Beale gives an insight into the use of letters at a time when few could write yet the power of the letter was undisputed.

The Cambridge History of Early Medieval English Literature

55 See W. H. Stevenson, 'Forgery of AngloSaxon Charters' in'AngloSaxon Chancery'; and Whitelock (ed. and trans.), English Historical Documents, pp. 337–43. 56 See Keynes, Diplomas ofKing Æthelred, pp.5–6. 57 Campbell (ed.) ...

The Cambridge History of Early Medieval English Literature

Informed by multicultural, multidisciplinary perspectives, The Cambridge History of Early Medieval English Literature offers a new exploration of the earliest writing in Britain and Ireland, from the end of the Roman Empire to the mid-twelfth century. Beginning with an account of writing itself, as well as of scripts and manuscript art, subsequent chapters examine the earliest texts from England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and the tremendous breadth of Anglo-Latin literature. Chapters on English learning and literature in the ninth century and the later formation of English poetry and prose also convey the profound cultural confidence of the period. Providing a discussion of essential texts, including Beowulf and the writings of Bede, this History captures the sheer inventiveness and vitality of early medieval literary culture through topics as diverse as the literature of English law, liturgical and devotional writing, the workings of science and the history of women's writing.

Heaven and Earth in Anglo Saxon England

Chaplais, P., 'The origin and authenticity of the royal AngloSaxon diploma', Journal of the Society of Archivists 3:2 (1965): 48–61. Chaplais, P., 'The AngloSaxon chancery: From the diploma to the writ', Journal of the Society of ...

Heaven and Earth in Anglo Saxon England

Christian theology and religious belief were crucially important to Anglo-Saxon society, and are manifest in the surviving textual, visual and material evidence. This is the first full-length study investigating how Christian theology and religious beliefs permeated society and underpinned social values in early medieval England. The influence of the early medieval Church as an institution is widely acknowledged, but Christian theology itself is generally considered to have been accessible only to a small educated elite. This book shows that theology had a much greater and more significant impact than has been recognised. An examination of theology in its social context, and how it was bound up with local authorities and powers, reveals a much more subtle interpretation of secular processes, and shows how theological debate affected the ways that religious and lay individuals lived and died. This was not a one-way flow, however: this book also examines how social and cultural practices and interests affected the development of theology in Anglo-Saxon England, and how ’popular’ belief interacted with literary and academic traditions. Through case-studies, this book explores how theological debate and discussion affected the personal perspectives of Christian Anglo-Saxons, including where possible those who could not read. In all of these, it is clear that theology was not detached from society or from the experiences of lay people, but formed an essential constituent part.

Medieval England 1042 1228

At first , William kept some AngloSaxons in his household , including Regenbald the Chancellor , Bundi and Ednoth . ... The chancery and the chancellor If the royal household in the Anglo - Saxon and Norman worlds was roughly similar in ...

Medieval England  1042 1228

The only A Level book on the market covering medieval History

Anglo Saxon Glastonbury

369–82 , Chaplais , ' The origin ' , ' The Anglo - Saxon chancery ' , and ' Some early AngloSaxon diplomas ' , Brooks , ' Anglo - Saxon charters ' , Keynes , The Diplomas of King Æthelred , pp . 1-39 , Wormald , Bede and the Conversion ...

Anglo Saxon Glastonbury

A survey of the landed endowment of Glastonbury Abbey before 1066, with a history of its estates.

Texts and Their Traditions in the Medieval Library of Rochester Cathedral Priory

As such it embodies a subtle argument for the continuity of Anglo - Saxon legal authority in a vastly changed society . ... and his “ The Anglo - Saxon Chancery : From the Diploma to the Writ , ” 3 : 4 ( 1966 ) , 174-75 .

Texts and Their Traditions in the Medieval Library of Rochester Cathedral Priory