The Antinomian Controversy 1636 1638

This new edition of the 1968 volume, published now for the first time in paperback, includes an expanding bibliography and a new preface, treating in more detail the prime figures of Anne Hutchinson and her chief clerical supporter, John ...

The Antinomian Controversy  1636 1638

The Antinomian controversy—a seventeenth-century theological crisis concerning salvation—was the first great intellectual crisis in the settlement of New England. Transcending the theological questions from which it arose, this symbolic controversy became a conflict between power and freedom of conscience. David D. Hall's thorough documentary history of this episode sheds important light on religion, society, and gender in early American history. This new edition of the 1968 volume, published now for the first time in paperback, includes an expanding bibliography and a new preface, treating in more detail the prime figures of Anne Hutchinson and her chief clerical supporter, John Cotton. Among the documents gathered here are transcripts of Anne Hutchinson's trial, several of Cotton's writings defending the Antinomian position, and John Winthrop's account of the controversy. Hall's increased focus on Hutchinson reveals the harshness and excesses with which the New England ministry tried to discredit her and reaffirms her place of prime importance in the history of American women.

Jonathan Edwards on Justification

David D. Hall, “Introduction,” in The Antinomian Controversy, 16361638: A Documentary History, ed. David D. Hall (Middletown: Wesleyan University Press, 1968), 4. 75. Michael Jinkins, “John Cotton and the Antinomian Controversy, ...

Jonathan Edwards on Justification

Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) was a preacher, theologian, and missionary to the Native Americans. This book asserts that Jonathan Edwards stood firmly on the Reformed tradition in the doctrine of justification.

1636 1700

Samuel Greene Arnold. THE ANTINOMIAN CONTROVERSY . 51 CHAPTER II . THE ANTINOMIAN CONTROVERSY . 1636-1638 . II . WHILE the colonists were legislating for the preserva- CHAP . tion of sound morals , by enacting sumptuary and other laws ...

1636 1700


The Worlds of William Penn

For primary texts see David D. Hall, ed., The Antinomian Controversy, 16361638: A Documentary History, 2nd ed. (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1990). 18. For the text's complex composition and publication history see David D. Hall, ...

The Worlds of William Penn

William Penn was an instrumental and controversial figure in the early modern transatlantic world, known both as a leader in the movement for religious toleration in England and as a founder of two American colonies, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. As such, his career was marked by controversy and contention in both England and America. This volume looks at William Penn with fresh eyes, bringing together scholars from a range of disciplines to assess his multifaceted life and career. Contributors analyze the worlds that shaped Penn and the worlds that he shaped: Irish, English, American, Quaker, and imperial. The eighteen chapters in The Worlds of William Penn shed critical new light on Penn’s life and legacy, examining his early and often-overlooked time in Ireland; the literary, political, and theological legacies of his public career during the Restoration and after the 1688 Revolution; his role as proprietor of Pennsylvania; his religious leadership in the Quaker movement, and as a loyal lieutenant to George Fox, and his important role in the broader British imperial project. Coinciding with the 300th anniversary of Penn’s death the time is right for this examination of Penn’s importance both in his own time and to the ongoing campaign for political and religious liberty

Troublers in Israel

Troublers in Israel


They Knew They Were Pilgrims

Cotton, The Way of Congregational Churches Cleared [1648], in David D. Hall, The Antinomian Controversy, 16361638: A Documentary History (Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1968), 411. 5. Winthrop, A Short Story of the Rise, ...

They Knew They Were Pilgrims

Published for the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower's landing, this ambitious new history of the Pilgrims and Plymouth Colony "will become the new standard work on the Plymouth Colony." (Thomas Kidd) "Informative, accessible, and compelling. . . . A welcome invitation to rediscover the Mayflower voyage and the founding of Plymouth Colony."--Daniel M. Gullotta, Christianity Today "[An] excellent new history. . . . [Turner] asserts that the Pilgrims matter for more than their legend, and he deftly uses the history of Plymouth to explore ideas of liberty in the American colonies."--Nathanael Blake, National Review In 1620, separatists from the Church of England set sail across the Atlantic aboard the Mayflower. Understanding themselves as spiritual pilgrims, they left to preserve their liberty to worship God in accordance with their understanding of the Bible. There exists, however, an alternative, more dispiriting version of their story. In it, the Pilgrims are religious zealots who persecuted dissenters and decimated Native peoples through warfare and by stealing their land. The Pilgrims' definition of liberty was, in practice, very narrow. Drawing on original research using underutilized sources, John G. Turner moves beyond these familiar narratives in his sweeping and authoritative new history of Plymouth Colony. Instead of depicting the Pilgrims as otherworldly saints or extraordinary sinners, he tells how a variety of English settlers and Native peoples engaged in a contest for the meaning of American liberty.

An American Triptych

A documentary account of the antinomian controversy as well as transcripts of Hutchinson's trial can be found in David Hall, ed., The Antinomian Controversy, 16361638: A Documentary History (Middletown, Conn.

An American Triptych

Anne Bradstreet, Emily Dickinson, and Adrienne Rich share nationality, gender, and an aesthetic tradition, but each expresses these experiences in the context of her own historical moment. Puritanism imposed stringent demands on Bradstreet, romanticism both inspired and restricted Dickinson, and feminism challenged as well as liberated Rich. Nevertheless, each poet succeeded in forming a personal vision that counters traditional male poetics. Their poetry celebrates daily life, demonstrates their commitment to nurturance rather than dominance, shows their resistance to the control of both their earthly and heavenly fathers, and affirms their experience in a world that has often denied women a voice. Wendy Martin recreates the textures of these women's lives, showing how they parallel the shifts in the status of American women from private companion to participant in a wider public life. The three portraits examine in detail the life and work of the Puritan wife of a colonial magistrate, the white-robed, reclusive New England seer, and the modern feminist and lesbian activist. Their poetry, Martin argues, tells us much about the evolution of feminist and patriarchal perspectives, from Bradstreet's resigned acceptance of traditional religion, to Dickinson's private rebellion, to Rich's public criticism of traditional masculine culture. Together, these portraits compose the panels of an American triptych. Beyond the dramatic contrasts between the Puritan and feminist vision, Martin finds striking parallels in form. An ideal of a new world, whether it be the city on the hill or a supportive community of women, inspires both. Like the commonwealth of saints, this concept of a female collectivity, which all three poets embrace, is a profoundly political phenomenon based on a pattern of protest and reform that is deeply rooted in American life. Martin suggests that, through their belief in regeneration and renewal, Bradstreet Dickinson, and Rich are part of a larger political as well as literary tradition. An American Triptych both enhances our understanding of the poets' work as part of the web of American experience and suggests the outlines of an American female poetic.

Agents of Wrath Sowers of Discord

“The Examination of Mrs. Anne Hutchinson at the Court at Newtown,” in The Antinomian Controversy, 1636-1638, ed. David D. Hall (Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1990), 343. John Winthrop, “Winthrop's Speech to the General ...

Agents of Wrath  Sowers of Discord

This book explores the authorities of Puritan Massachusetts balanced concern for the stability of the colony and the integrity of its Puritan mission with the hopes of reconciling dissidents back into the colonial community.

Erroneous and Schismatical Opinions The Question of Orthodoxy regarding the Theology of Hanserd Knollys c 1599 1691

When Knollys arrived in Massachusetts the governor John Winthrop , in 1638 , states he was " rejected by us for holding ... The Antinomian Controversy raged in Massachusetts from 1636 to 1638.9 Its central figures allegedly espousing ...

Erroneous and Schismatical Opinions  The Question of Orthodoxy regarding the Theology of Hanserd Knollys  c  1599   1691

The English Calvinistic Baptist Hanserd Knollys was personally charged with holding heterodox beliefs, in particular, Antinomianism, Anabaptism and Fifth Monarchism (postmortem also hyper-Calvinism). This book systematically and comprehensively examines these charges against Knollys' writings to determine if they are valid.

Opening Scripture

The Antinomian Controversy, 16361638: A Documentary History. 2d ed. Durham: Duke University Press, 1990. ———. The Faithful Shepherd: A History of the New England Ministry in the Seventeenth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North ...

Opening Scripture

"Opening Scripture provides a thorough and original account of ministerial and lay strategies for interpreting Scripture in the Massachusetts Bay. Demonstrating an impressive command of the vast literature and history of the period, Lisa Gordis moves deftly through discussions of major figures and events. This is a significant intervention in the study of Puritan New England."—Sandra M. Gustafson, University of Notre Dame What role did the Bible really play in Puritan New England? Many have treated it as a blunt instrument used to cudgel dissenters into submission, but Lisa M. Gordis reveals instead that Puritan readings of the Bible showed great complexity and literary sophistication—so much complexity, in fact, that controversies over biblical interpretation threatened to tear Puritan society apart. Drawing on Puritan preaching manuals and sermons as well as the texts of early religious controversies, Gordis argues that Puritan ministers did not expect to impose their views on their congregations. Instead they believed that interpretive consensus would emerge from the process of reading the Bible, with the Holy Spirit assisting readers to understand God's will. Treating the conflict over Roger Williams, the Antinomian Controversy, and the reluctant compromises of the Halfway Covenant as symptoms of a crisis that was as much literary as it was social or spiritual, Opening Scripture explores the profound consequences of Puritan negotiations over biblical interpretation for New England's literature and history.

Divinings Religion at Harvard

1.2 A High Calvinist Doctrine of Predestination to Salvation (Soteriology) Shapes the Contours of the College: Anne Hutchinson and the Antinomian Controversy, 16361638 Although already frequently referenced, Anne Hutchinson and the ...

Divinings  Religion at Harvard

Harvard has often been referred to as "godless Harvard." This is far from the truth. Fact is that Harvard is and always has been concerned about religion. This volume addresses the reasons for this. The story of religion at Harvard in many ways is the story of religion in the United States. This edition will clarify this relationship. Furthermore, the question of religion is central not only to the religious history of Harvard but to its very corporate structure and institutional evolution. The volume is divided into three parts and deals withthe Formation of Harvard College in 1636 and Evolution of a Republic of Letters in Cambridge ("First Light", Chapters 1–5); Religion in the University, the Foundations of a Learned Ministry and the Development of the Divinity School (The "Augustan Age", Chapters 6–9); and the Contours of Religion and Commitment in an Age of Upheaval and Globalization ("Calm Rising Through Change and Through Storm", Chapters 10–12).The story of the central role played by religion in the development of Harvard is a neglected factor in Harvard's history only touched upon in a most cursory fashion by previous publications. For the first time George H. Williamstells that story as embedded in American culture and subject to intense and continuing academic study throughout the history of the University to this day.Replete with extensive footnotes, this edition will be a treasure to future historians, persons interested in religious history and in the development of theology, at first clearly Reformed and Protestant, later ecumenical and interfaith.

Divinings Religion at Harvard

1.2 A High Calvinist Doctrine of Predestination to Salvation (Soteriology) Shapes the Contours of the College: Anne Hutchinson and the Antinomian Controversy, 16361638 Although already frequently referenced, Anne Hutchinson and the ...

Divinings  Religion at Harvard

This volume tells a story central to American history and to the evolution of theology in an age of interfaith sensitivities.

A New Divinity

But as Theodore Bozeman has noted, without Cotton's role the “famed Antinomian Controversy of 16361638 is difficult to imagine.”20 In fact, the controversy involved theologians from across the Atlantic as well.

A New Divinity

This is a study on Reformed theological debates during the »Long Eighteenth Century« in Britain and New England. By »Long« a period that goes beyond 1700–1799 is in view. This examination begins just before the eighteenth century by looking at the Neonomian-Antinomian debate in the 1690s. This is followed by the Marrow Controversy in Scotland in the eighteenth century. After that, the authors address the ecclesiological debates between George Whitefield and the Erskines. The doctrine of free choice concerning Edwards and his departure from classical Reformed orthodoxy is highlighted next, followed by reflections on the Edwardseans and the atonement. Returning to Britain again, the volume provides a study on hyper-Calvinism, and on eschatological differences among key figures in the eighteenth century. More specific debates in particular Baptist circles are noted, including the battle over Sandemandianism and the Trinitarian battles fought by Andrew Fuller and others. Returning to ecclesiology, a discussion on the subscription controversy in Philadelphia in the early eighteenth century and an analysis of the debate about the nature of »revival« in New England close this volume.

The Catholic Roots of the Protestant Gospel

The controversy reached its most fervid pitch between October 1636 and March 1638 through the vitriolic preachments of the three antinomian leaders : Anne Hutchinson , their chief apostle , John Wheelwright , her brother - in - law ...

The Catholic Roots of the Protestant Gospel

This work is the first detailed account of the origin of Protestantism's most salient concepts of salvation. Doctrines such as faith alone, assurance of divine forgiveness, forensic justification, etc. are seen to find their origin in Catholic teaching.

John Winthrop

The term “Antinomian Controversy” was first popularized by George Bancroft in his History of the United States, ... and Ruine of the Antinomians, Familists & Libertines,” in The Anti- nomian Controversy 16361638: A Documentary History, ...

John Winthrop

Puritan politician, lawyer, and lay theologian John Winthrop fled England in 1630 when it looked like Charles I had successfully blocked all hopes of passing Puritan-inspired reforms in Parliament. Leading a migration, he came to New England in the hopes of creating an ideal Puritan community and eventually became the governor of Massachusetts. Winthrop is remembered for his role in the Puritan migration to the colonies and for delivering what is probably the most famous lay sermon in American history, "A Model of Christian Charity." In it he proclaimed that New England would be "a city upon a hill"--an example for future colonies. In John Winthrop: Founding the City upon a Hill, Michael Parker examines the political and religious history of this iconic figure. In this short biography, bolstered by letters, sermons, and maps, John Winthrop introduces students to the colonial world, the Pequot Wars, and the history of American Exceptionalism.

Miraculous Plagues

... text as Winthrop's—a convenient shorthand used in David Hall's edition of the controversy's primary documents (The Antinomian Controversy 16361638: A Documentary History, 2nd ed. [Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1990], 199–310).

Miraculous Plagues

In the summer of 1629, John Winthrop described a series of epidemics that devastated Native American populations along the eastern seaboard of New England as a "miraculous plague." Winthrop was struck by the providential nature of these waves of disease, which contributed neatly to the settlers' justifications for colonial expansion. Taking Winthrop's phrase as its cornerstone, Miraculous Plagues reimagines New England's literary history by tracing seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century epidemics alongside events including early migration, the Antinomian controversy, the evolution of the halfway covenant and jeremiad, and Boston's 1721 inoculation controversy. Moving beyond familiar histories of New World epidemics (often referred to as the "virgin soil" model), Cristobal Silva identifies epidemiology as a generic category with specialized forms and conventions. Epidemiology functions as both subject and method in Silva's argument, as he details narratives that represent modes of infection, population distribution, and immunity. He considers how regional and generational patterns of illness affected the perception of communal identity, and he analyzes the translation of epidemic events into narrative and generic terms, providing scholars a new way to conceptualize the relationship between immunology and ideology. Closing with a discussion of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, Miraculous Plagues underscores the portability of its insights into the geopolitics of medicine. Just as epidemiology aided in transforming colonial America, it continues to influence questions of geography, community, and identity that are bound up in global health practices today.

The Passion of Anne Hutchinson

References come from the excellent collection, David D. Hall, ed., The Antinomian Controversy, 16361638: A Documentary History (1968; Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1990), 201–310. 3. Edmund S. Morgan, The Puritan Dilemma: The ...

The Passion of Anne Hutchinson

Prologue: Anne Hutchinson and the Controversy -- The Puritan Experiment: Errors and Trials -- Helpmeets, Mothers, and Midwives among the Patriarchs -- Sectarian Mysticism and Spiritual Power -- Prophesying Women and the Gifts of the Spirit -- Gracious Disciples and Frightened Magistrates -- A Froward Woman Beloved of God.

Head and Heart

David D. Hall, The Antinomian Controversy, 16361638: A Documentary History, 2nd ed. (Duke University Press, 1990), p. 8. 49. Christopher Hill,The WorldTurned Upside Down: RadicalIdeas Duringthe English Revolution (Viking Press, 1972).

Head and Heart

Look out for a new book from Garry Wills, What the Qur'an Meant, coming fall 2017. Gary Wills has won significant acclaim for his bestselling works of religion and history. Here, for the first time, he combines both disciplines in a sweeping examination of Christianity in America throughout the last 400 years. Wills argues that the struggle now, as throughout our nation's history, is between the head and the heart, reason and emotion, enlightenment and Evangelism. A landmark volume for anyone interested in either politics or religion, Head and Heart concludes that, while religion is a fertile and enduring force in American politics, the tension between the two is necessary, inevitable, and unending.