Thirteen

Thirteen is the shocking and miraculous true story of how the astronauts and ground crew guided Apollo 13 back to Earth.

Thirteen

An “exciting” minute-by-minute account of the Apollo 13 flight based on mission control transcripts from Houston (The New York Times). On the evening of April 13, 1970, the three astronauts aboard Apollo 13 were just hours from the third lunar landing in history. But as they soared through space, two hundred thousand miles from Earth, an explosion badly damaged their spacecraft. With compromised engines and failing life-support systems, the crew was in incomparably grave danger. Faced with below-freezing temperatures, a seriously ill crewmember, and a dwindling water supply, a safe return seemed unlikely. Thirteen is the shocking and miraculous true story of how the astronauts and ground crew guided Apollo 13 back to Earth. Expanding on dispatches written for the New Yorker, Henry S. F. Cooper Jr. brings readers unparalleled detail on the moment-by-moment developments of one of NASA’s most dramatic missions.

Memories of the Apollo and Space Shuttle Programs

The book also describes the Lunar Module; without its concept, we may have never made the Moon landings. The book also details how we beat the Russians to the Moon, covers all Apollo missions, and how we saved the Apollo 13 astronauts.

Memories of the Apollo and Space Shuttle Programs

I have had the privilege of being an engineer who worked on both the Apollo and Space Shuttle Orbiter Programs for more than forty-five years. It has been a fascinating and rewarding experience, along with its share of pressures and disappointments. Come take this exciting journey with me. In this book, I present the contributions of thirty key scientists who, over a period of 2,500 years, made the Moon visit possible in my lifetime. I review the birth of the Space Age, early Russian do

Apollo Spacecraft Familiarization Manual

This manual provides general introductory data for personnel associated with the Apollo program.

Apollo Spacecraft Familiarization Manual

This manual provides general introductory data for personnel associated with the Apollo program. Each command and service module system is discussed in general terms, but with sufficient detail to convey a clear understanding of the systems. In addition, the Apollo earth orbit and lunar landing missions are described, planned, completed, and test programs or missions are identified. Manufacturing, training equipment, ground support equipment, space vehicles and the lunar module are all covered in gross terms. The source information used in the preparation of this manual was that available as of November 1, 1966. This manual was prepared for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration by Space and Information Systems Division of North American Aviation, Inc., Downey, California. Illustrated throughout.

Chariots for Apollo

Written by a trio of experts, this is the definitive reference on the Apollo spacecraft and lunar modules.

Chariots for Apollo

Written by a trio of experts, this is the definitive reference on the Apollo spacecraft and lunar modules. It traces the design of the vehicles, their development, and their operation in space. More than 100 photographs and illustrations highlight the text, which begins with NASA's origins and concludes with the triumphant Apollo 11 moon mission.

The Apollo Missions

Explores scientists' thrilling quest to land on the moon.

The Apollo Missions

Explores scientists' thrilling quest to land on the moon. Engaging text, vibrant photos, and informative infographics help readers learn about this important advancement in exploring space, as well as the people and technology that made it possible.

The Apollo Guidance Computer

Much of this work centered on his primary interests, the Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) and the Lunar Module. These Journals are generally considered the canonical online reference on the flights to the Moon.

The Apollo Guidance Computer

The technological marvel that facilitated the Apollo missions to the Moon was the on-board computer. In the 1960s most computers filled an entire room, but the spacecraft’s computer was required to be compact and low power. Although people today find it difficult to accept that it was possible to control a spacecraft using such a ‘primitive’ computer, it nevertheless had capabilities that are advanced even by today’s standards. This is the first book to fully describe the Apollo guidance computer’s architecture, instruction format and programs used by the astronauts. As a comprehensive account, it will span the disciplines of computer science, electrical and aerospace engineering. However, it will also be accessible to the ‘space enthusiast’. In short, the intention is for this to be the definitive account of the Apollo guidance computer. Frank O’Brien’s interest in the Apollo program began as a serious amateur historian. About 12 years ago, he began performing research and writing essays for the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal, and the Apollo Flight Journal. Much of this work centered on his primary interests, the Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC) and the Lunar Module. These Journals are generally considered the canonical online reference on the flights to the Moon. He was then asked to assist the curatorial staff in the creation of the Cradle of Aviation Museum, on Long Island, New York, where he helped prepare the Lunar Module simulator, a LM procedure trainer and an Apollo space suit for display. He regularly lectures on the Apollo computer and related topics to diverse groups, from NASA's computer engineering conferences, the IEEE/ACM, computer festivals and university student groups.

The Apollo Missions

Packed with awe-inspiring photographs of the space missions, astronauts, and iconic views of the Earth and the Moon, as well as technical diagrams, flight plans, and tables of statistics, The Apollo Missions tells the thrilling story of the ...

The Apollo Missions

Few events have matched the landing of the first man on the Moon for drama and excitement. Watched live on television by 600 million people, Neil Armstrong floated down from the final step of the Eagle's ladder onto the powdery surface of the Moon, uttering the famous line, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." The Apollo Missions relives the experience and all the drama as it unfolded, from the birth of the Apollo space programme and the very first attempts to put an American astronaut into space to Apollo 11's successful Moon landing and its celebrated final splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. Packed with awe-inspiring photographs of the space missions, astronauts, and iconic views of the Earth and the Moon, as well as technical diagrams, flight plans, and tables of statistics, The Apollo Missions tells the thrilling story of the race to the Moon.

The Apollo Spacecraft A Chronology

This, the second volume of the Apollo Spacecraft Chronology, takes up the story where the first left off, in November 1962. The first volume dealt with the birth of the Apollo Program and traced its early development.

The Apollo Spacecraft   A Chronology

This, the second volume of the Apollo Spacecraft Chronology, takes up the story where the first left off, in November 1962. The first volume dealt with the birth of the Apollo Program and traced its early development. The second concerns its teenage period, up to September 30, 1964. By late 1962 the broad conceptual design of the Apollo spacecraft and the Apollo lunar landing mission was complete. The Administrator formally advised the President of the United States on December 10 that NASA had selected lunar orbit rendezvous over direct ascent and earth orbit rendezvous as the mode for landing on the moon. All major spacecraft contractors had been selected; detailed system design and early developmental testing were under way.

Apollo Experience Report

The acceptance checkout equipment for the Apollo spacecraft is described, and the history of the major equipment modifications that were required to meet the Apollo Program checkout requirements is traced.

Apollo Experience Report

The acceptance checkout equipment for the Apollo spacecraft is described, and the history of the major equipment modifications that were required to meet the Apollo Program checkout requirements is traced. Some major problem areas are outlined, and a discussion of future checkout methods is included. The concept of the future checkout methods presented provides for an increase in test equipment standardization among NASA programs and among all testing phases within a program. The capability for increased automation and reduction in the test equipment inventory is provided in the proposed concept.

The Apollo Spacecraft

The Apollo Spacecraft


The Apollo Spacecraft

The Apollo Spacecraft: Evolution, Engineering, and Flight Operations' is the definitive description of the spacecraft and the technologies used for the journey to the Moon.

The Apollo Spacecraft

'The Apollo Spacecraft: Evolution, Engineering, and Flight Operations' is the definitive description of the spacecraft and the technologies used for the journey to the Moon. The spacecraft that eventually landed on the Moon did not spring fully formed because of Kennedy's May 1961 challenge. 'The Apollo Spacecraft' begins by tracing its origins from 1959 when contract bids were already being prepared for a lunar spacecraft. Caught unprepared for a full lunar landing mission, von Braun and other NASA engineers recognized that the spacecraft already under development could never be reconciled with the mission architectures under consideration. Changing the mission architecture and introducing a new spacecraft, the Lunar Module, threw the development of the Apollo CSM into a lurch by requiring significant modifications to the vehicle. The resulting spacecraft, while pushing the limits of the possible, became a complex set of compromises. By tracking the spacecraft's development with its numerous fits and false starts, 'Apollo Spacecrafts' describes how the final mission design and flight operations reflected these early engineering decisions.

NASA Apollo Spacecraft Command and Service Module News Reference

Although it may be one of the most complete studies of the systems and technology that made the "giant leap" possible, it's never been easy to find copies of this text because copies were never widely released -- until now.

NASA Apollo Spacecraft Command and Service Module News Reference

Originally created in 1968 by prime contractor North American Rockwell for NASA, the Apollo Spacecraft News Reference (CSM) was intended to educate members of the media, government, and private sector contractors about one of history's most ambitious undertakings. Within its pages you'll find general information about the Apollo Program, and detailed examinations of component Modules, Subsystems and Support, with special focus on the Command Module. ( A companion volume focusing on the LEM is also available.) Chapters include: Introduction, Saturn Launch Vehicles, Mission Description, The Moon and the History of Space Flight, Apollo Flight Tests, Command Module Overview, Service Module Overview, Lunar Module and SLA (Spacecraft-LM Adapter) Overview, Crew Accomodations, Displays and Controls, Docking Subsystem, Earth Landing Subsystem, Electrical Power Subsystem, Environmental Control Subsystem, Launch Escape Subsystem, Reaction Control Subsystem, Service Propulsion Subsystem, Telecommunications Subsystem, Stabilization and Control, Guidance and Navigation, Spacesuits, Final Testing, Safety, Reliability and Training, Apollo Manufacturing, Apollo Subcontractors, CSM Contract, Biographies, Apollo Chronology, Apollo Facts, Glossary, Abbreviations, Index. Although it may be one of the most complete studies of the systems and technology that made the "giant leap" possible, it's never been easy to find copies of this text because copies were never widely released -- until now. This reprint is of an edition featuring a mission similar to Apollo 12, and features all the original text, diagrams and photos. It's a wonderful reference for the space flight fan, docent or engineering buff or for anyone else who ever wondered, "How'd they do that "

A Man on the Moon

A Man on the Moon is also the basis for the acclaimed miniseries produced by Tom Hanks, From the Earth to the Moon, now airing and streaming again on HBO in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11.

A Man on the Moon

"The authoritative masterpiece" (L. A. Times) on the Apollo space program and NASA's journey to the moon This acclaimed portrait of heroism and ingenuity captures a watershed moment in human history. The astronauts themselves have called it the definitive account of their missions. On the night of July 20, 1969, our world changed forever when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. Based on in-depth interviews with twenty-three of the twenty-four moon voyagers, as well as those who struggled to get the program moving, A Man on the Moon conveys every aspect of the Apollo missions with breathtaking immediacy and stunning detail. A Man on the Moon is also the basis for the acclaimed miniseries produced by Tom Hanks, From the Earth to the Moon, now airing and streaming again on HBO in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11.

The Apollo 13 Mission

"Explains the Apollo 13 crisis, including its chronology, causes, and lasting effects"--

The Apollo 13 Mission

"Explains the Apollo 13 crisis, including its chronology, causes, and lasting effects"--

THE APOLLO MOON MISSIONS

This book is culmination of that research and the reasons why I believe that the Apollo Moon missions were faked.

THE APOLLO MOON MISSIONS

As a child I was fascinated by the Apollo Moon missions. As I got older the fascination never waned, until, approximately 15 years ago, I happened to watch a documentary on one of the Apollo missions. In that they discussed the method used for circumnavigating the Moon during the missions. As a trained pilot I remember questioning that method of navigation and from there I started to doubt the validity of the Apollo Moon missions itself, which led to subsequent years of research. This book is culmination of that research and the reasons why I believe that the Apollo Moon missions were faked. Included in Part 1 of this series I discuss the following key factors:  The Saturn V rocket and the fraudulent claims on the powerful F-1 engines, without which the Apollo landings could not have taken place.  The non-existent capabilities of the Apollo guidance computer and the fact that this computer was a fake.  The conflicting and contradictory information regarding the radiation intensity between the Earth and Moon which would have prevented any manned lunar landing.  The inadequate shielding for both the Command Module and Lunar Module which would have ended any manned mission outside of Low Earth Orbit in a matter of minutes if not seconds.  And the incomplete, missing and/or destroyed documents along with the thousands of missing reels of telemetry tapes containing data that has been 'lost' forever

Apollo and America s Moon Landing Program

" In this chronology, as with any collection of written communications on a given project, the negative aspects of the program, its faltering and its failures, become more apparent because these are the areas that require written ...

Apollo and America s Moon Landing Program

This comprehensive official NASA history document is an crucial reference to the day-by-day activities and decisions which led to the overwhelming success of the Apollo moon landing program. All four volumes of the Chronology are included in his massive conversion - part one reproduces Volumes 1 and 2, while part two reproduces Volumes 3 and 4. The preface to Volume 1 states: "The intent of the authors is to concentrate on the important events that have affected the concept, design, and development of the Apollo spacecraft rather than to cover in detail the entire Apollo program. In keeping with this intent, the authors have tried to give a balanced overview of the Apollo spacecraft program, not limiting the chronology to the activities of a single NASA Center. Volume 1 Part I, "Concept to Apollo," reviews the earliest years up to the official announcement of the Apollo program. Part II, "Design-Decision-Contract," continues through the selection of the principal contractor for the command and service modules. Part III, "Lunar Orbit Rendezvous: Mode and Module," completes Volume I, ending with the naming of the contractor for the lunar module. As far as possible, primary sources were consulted. These included congressional documents, Apollo program status reports, Manned Spacecraft Center and Apollo Spacecraft Project Office weekly activity reports, contractors' progress reports, Apollo working papers, letters, memoranda, NASA and industry staff reports, minutes of meetings, and interviews with persons directly involved in the early years of the Apollo program. In addition, books, newspaper accounts, press releases, chronologies, and magazine articles were researched for material." Volume 1 covers the period through 1962; Volume 2 from 1962 to 1964; Volume 3 from 1964 to 1966; and the final volume from 1966 to 1974. The foreword to Volume 4 reads: "The events that took place during that period included all flight tests of the Apollo spacecraft, as well as the last five Gemini flights, the AS-204 accident, the AS-204 Review Board activities, the Apollo Block II Redefinition Tasks, the manned Apollo flight program and its results, as well as further use of the Apollo spacecraft in the Skylab missions. The manned flights of Apollo, scheduled to begin in early 1967, were delayed by the tragic accident that occurred on January 27, 1967, during a simulated countdown for mission AS-204. A fire inside the command module resulted in the deaths of the three prime crew astronauts, Virgil I. Grissom, Edward H. White II, and Roger B. Chaffee. On January 28, 1967, the Apollo 204 Review Board was established to investigate the accident. It was determined that action should be initiated to reduce the crew risk by eliminating unnecessary hazardous conditions that would imperil future missions. Therefore, on April 27, a NASA Task Team - Block II Redefinition, CSM - was established to provide input on detailed design, overall quality and reliability, test and checkout, baseline specification, configuration control, and schedules." In this chronology, as with any collection of written communications on a given project, the negative aspects of the program, its faltering and its failures, become more apparent because these are the areas that require written communication for corrective action. However, it should be stressed that in spite of the failures, the moon was reached by traveling an unparalleled path of success for an undertaking so complex. The disastrous fire at Cape Kennedy had given the Apollo program a drastic setback. But when Apollo 7 was launched, the first manned flight in nearly two years, it was a success. Every spacecraft since that time improved in performance with the exception of the problems experienced in Apollo 13.

Apollo 8

Here is the tale of a mission that was both a calculated risk and a wild crapshoot, a stirring account of how three American heroes forever changed our view of the home planet.

Apollo 8

The untold story of the historic voyage to the moon that closed out one of our darkest years with a nearly unimaginable triumph In August 1968, NASA made a bold decision: in just sixteen weeks, the United States would launch humankind’s first flight to the moon. Only the year before, three astronauts had burned to death in their spacecraft, and since then the Apollo program had suffered one setback after another. Meanwhile, the Russians were winning the space race, the Cold War was getting hotter by the month, and President Kennedy’s promise to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade seemed sure to be broken. But when Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders were summoned to a secret meeting and told of the dangerous mission, they instantly signed on. Written with all the color and verve of the best narrative non-fiction, Apollo 8 takes us from Mission Control to the astronaut’s homes, from the test labs to the launch pad. The race to prepare an untested rocket for an unprecedented journey paves the way for the hair-raising trip to the moon. Then, on Christmas Eve, a nation that has suffered a horrendous year of assassinations and war is heartened by an inspiring message from the trio of astronauts in lunar orbit. And when the mission is over—after the first view of the far side of the moon, the first earth-rise, and the first re-entry through the earth’s atmosphere following a flight to deep space—the impossible dream of walking on the moon suddenly seems within reach. The full story of Apollo 8 has never been told, and only Jeffrey Kluger—Jim Lovell’s co-author on their bestselling book about Apollo 13—can do it justice. Here is the tale of a mission that was both a calculated risk and a wild crapshoot, a stirring account of how three American heroes forever changed our view of the home planet.