The Apotheosis of Captain Cook

In this new edition of The Apotheosis of Captain Cook, the author addresses, in a lengthy afterword, Marshall Sahlins's 1994 book, How "Natives" Think, which was a direct response to this work.

The Apotheosis of Captain Cook

Here Gananath Obeyesekere debunks one of the most enduring myths of imperialism, civilization, and conquest: the notion that the Western civilizer is a god to savages. Using shipboard journals and logs kept by Captain James Cook and his officers, Obeyesekere reveals the captain as both the self-conscious civilizer and as the person who, his mission gone awry, becomes a "savage" himself. In this new edition of The Apotheosis of Captain Cook, the author addresses, in a lengthy afterword, Marshall Sahlins's 1994 book, How "Natives" Think, which was a direct response to this work.

Captain Cook

4 ' Notwithstanding our signs to the contrary ' : textuality and authority at the
Endeavour River , June to August 1771 STUART MURRAY Gananath
Obeyesekere's 1992 study The Apotheosis of Captain Cook marked the high
point of a critical ...

Captain Cook

Essays reassess Cook's standing as a leading figure in eighteenth-century history, exploration and the advancement of science.

The Voyages of Captain Cook

FURTHER READING J . C . Beaglehole , The Journals of Captain Cook ,
Cambridge 1955 – 67 G . Williams ( ed . ) , Captain Cook ' s Voyages 1768 –
1779 , London 1997 R . Hough , Captain Cook : A Biography , London 1993 P . O
' Brian ...

The Voyages of Captain Cook

Cook's three voyages of discovery, which took place between 1768 and 1779, are among the most remarkable achievements in the history of exploration. Cook charted vast areas of the globe with astonishing accuracy, and the voyages also made a significant contribution towards solving some of the great problems of cartography and navigation.With crews containing gifted sailors and navigators, as well as botanists, painters and scientists, Cook provides the link between the speculative, profit-hungry voyages of the Elizabethan seafarers and the scientific expeditions of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

The Social Construction of What

About Captain Cook, for Example, a retort to the work of another distinguished
anthropologist, Gananath Obeyeskere's 1992 The Apotheosis of Captain Cook:
European Mythmaking in the Pacific. I discussed Sahlins's book in The London ...

The Social Construction of What

Often lost in the debate over the validity of social construction is the question of what is being constructed. Particularly troublesome in this area is the status of the natural sciences, where there is conflict between biological and social approaches to mental illness, and in other areas. Ian Hacking looks at the issue of child abuse, and examines the ways in which advanced research on new weapons influences not the content but the form of science. In conclusion, Hacking comments on the "culture wars" in anthropology, in particular the spat between leading enthnographers over Hawaii and Captain Cook.

James Cook

Engraving after John Webber, 'The Apotheosis of Captain Cook' Kamchatka, the
Chukchi Peninsula, Nootka Sound and Unalaska. During the procession news
arrives of the death of Cook at Hawai'i. The play ends with a song eulogising him:
 ...

James Cook

The twenty-fifth of August 2018 marks the 250th anniversary of the departure of the Endeavour from Plymouth, England, and the first of three voyages by James Cook that would nearly complete the map of the world. Interweaving accounts of scientific discovery with the personal stories of the voyages’ key participants, William Frame and Laura Walker explore the charting of the Pacific and the natural world, the first encounters and exchange between Western and indigenous cultures, and the representation of the voyages in art. The illustrations, many of which have never before been published, include drawings by all the artists employed on the voyages, including Alexander Buchan, Sydney Parkinson, William Hodges, and John Webber. It also includes the only surviving paintings by Tupaia, a Polynesian high priest and navigator who joined the first voyage at Tahiti and sailed with Cook to New Zealand and Australia. A stunningly illustrated object-centred history, James Cook: The Voyages offers a once-in-a-generation opportunity to discover the extensive Captain Cook collection of the British Library, including original maps, artworks, journals, and printed books.

The Death of Captain Cook

Such queries were overshadowed by the assault on Sahlins by a fellow
anthropologist, the Sri Lankan Gananath Obeyesekere, who in his book, The
Apotheosis of Captain Cook, condemned the idealisation of Cook, the humane
and ...

The Death of Captain Cook

Argues that the British Admiralty covered up details of explorer James Cook's death on a Hawaiian beach and facets of his personality in order to create a portrait of a hero.

How Natives Think

Preface y hen Gananath Obeyesekere published his book The Apotheosis of
Captain Cook ( 1992 ) , which attacked me and Captain Cook as agents ( in our
different ways ) of Western violence and imperialism , I thought to let it pass .

How  Natives  Think

On Captain Cook.

The Last Voyage of Captain James Cook

Recreates in detail Captain Cook's third and last great voyage of discovery, delineating the paradoxical characters of the officers of the two ships, many exotic ports of call, and the series of mishaps, follies, and misunderstandings that ...

The Last Voyage of Captain James Cook

Recreates in detail Captain Cook's third and last great voyage of discovery, delineating the paradoxical characters of the officers of the two ships, many exotic ports of call, and the series of mishaps, follies, and misunderstandings that led to Cook's murder.

Beyond Textuality

British cannibals: Contemplation of an event in the death and resurrection of
James Cook, explorer Gananath Obeyesekere 1. The dark side of being human
This paper is a take off from my book entitled The Apotheosis of Captain Cook.

Beyond Textuality


A New Imperial History

CHAPTER l6 Thinking back: gender misrecognition and Polynesian subversions
aboard the Cook voyages Kathleen Wilson Between 1768 and 1780, Captain
James Cook and his crews embarked upon a set of voyages of discovery that ...

A New Imperial History

This pioneering collection of essays charts an exciting new field in British studies, 'the new imperial history'. Leading scholars from history, literature and cultural studies tackle problems of identity, modernity and difference in eighteenth-century Britain and the empire. They examine, from interdisciplinary perspectives, the reciprocal influences of empire and culture, the movements of peoples, practices and ideas effected by slavery, diaspora and British dominance, and ways in which subaltern, non-western and non-elite people shaped British power and knowledge. The essays move through Britain, America, India, Africa and the South Pacific in testament to the networks of people, commodities and entangled pasts forged by Britain's imperial adventures. Based on ground-breaking research, these analyses of the imperial dimensions of British culture and identities in global contexts will challenge the notion that empire was something that happened 'out there', and they demonstrate its long-lasting implications for British identity and everyday life.

Captain Cook and the South Pacific

It was perhaps with the idea of bridging illustrative material from both Cook's
Second and Third Voyage that ... The only other scene in the pantomime which
can be visually documented is the Apotheosis of Captain Cook in the last scene
of the ...

Captain Cook and the South Pacific


The Columbia Guide to Asian American History

After Cook's death, Kalaniopuu went into seclusion, following the procedure for
both the Makahiki ritual and the death of a ... 8 THE MYTH OF CAPTAIN COOK
Anthropologist Gananath Obeyesekere wrote The Apotheosis of Captain Cook: ...

The Columbia Guide to Asian American History

Offering a rich and insightful road map of Asian American history as it has evolved over more than 200 years, this book marks the first systematic attempt to take stock of this field of study. It examines, comments, and questions the changing assumptions and contexts underlying the experiences and contributions of an incredibly diverse population of Americans. Arriving and settling in this nation as early as the 1790s, with American-born generations stretching back more than a century, Asian Americans have become an integral part of the American experience; this cleverly organized book marks the trajectory of that journey, offering researchers invaluable information and interpretation. Part 1 offers a synoptic narrative history, a chronology, and a set of periodizations that reflect different ways of constructing the Asian American past. Part 2 presents lucid discussions of historical debates—such as interpreting the anti-Chinese movement of the late 1800s and the underlying causes of Japanese American internment during World War II—and such emerging themes as transnationalism and women and gender issues. Part 3 contains a historiographical essay and a wide-ranging compilation of book, film, and electronic resources for further study of core themes and groups, including Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Hmong, Indian, Korean, Vietnamese, and others.

Cannibal Talk

... on my book The Apotheosis of Captain Cook (Princeton University Press, 1992
). That was a wonderful year in my intellectual career, and I must thank the
center's staff, especially those working in the library, for making my stay so
successful.

Cannibal Talk

In this radical reexamination of the notion of cannibalism, Gananath Obeyesekere offers a fascinating and convincing argument that cannibalism is mostly "cannibal talk," a discourse on the Other engaged in by both indigenous peoples and colonial intruders that results in sometimes funny and sometimes deadly cultural misunderstandings. Turning his keen intelligence to Polynesian societies in the early periods of European contact and colonization, Obeyesekere deconstructs Western eyewitness accounts, carefully examining their origins and treating them as a species of fiction writing and seamen's yarns. Cannibalism is less a social or cultural fact than a mythic representation of European writing that reflects much more the realities of European societies and their fascination with the practice of cannibalism, he argues. And while very limited forms of cannibalism might have occurred in Polynesian societies, they were largely in connection with human sacrifice and carried out by a select community in well-defined sacramental rituals. Cannibal Talk considers how the colonial intrusion produced a complex self-fulfilling prophecy whereby the fantasy of cannibalism became a reality as natives on occasion began to eat both Europeans and their own enemies in acts of "conspicuous anthropophagy."

Rules Magic and Instrumental Reason

The bone of contention between these two scholars involves the proper
interpretation of the events surrounding Captain James Cook's encounter with
the Hawaiians and eventual death at their hands. In a number of publications,
Sahlins ...

Rules  Magic and Instrumental Reason

This book offers a systematic and critical discussion of Peter Winch's writings on the philosophy of the social sciences. The author points to Winch's tendency to over-emphasize the importance of language and communication, and his insufficient attention to the role of practical, technological activites in human life and society. It also offers an appendix devoted to the controversy between the anthropologists Marshall Sahlins and Gananath Obeyesekere regarding Captain James Cook's Hawaiian adventures. Essential reading for those studying the development of philosophy in the twentieth century, this book will also be of great interest to anthropologists, sociologists, scholars of religion, and all those with an interest in the relationship between philosophy and the social sciences.

Publish and Perish

Note The third of these tales, “Casting the Runes,” is a pastiche of the short story
of the same name by M. R. James ... in Ganneth Obeyesekere's The Apotheosis
of Captain Cook: European Mythmaking in the Pacific (Princeton University Press
 ...

Publish and Perish

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Publisher's Weekly Best Book of the Year Combining the wit of David Lodge with Poe's delicious sense of the macabre, these are three witty, spooky novellas of satire set in academia—a world where Derrida rules, love is a "complicated ideological position," and poetic justice is served with an ideological twist.

The Death of Captain Cook and Other Writings

See Elizabeth Bott , Tongan Society at the Time of Captain Cook ' s Visits (
Wellington : Polynesian Society , 1982 ) . Some sense of the proliferation of later
editions may be gained from M . K . Beddie , Bibliography of Captain James Cook
 ...

The Death of Captain Cook and Other Writings

The voyages of Captain Cook have been endlessly fascinating to a wide audience, and no aspect of them has been more controversial than Cook's death. This book reprints one of the classic accounts of this episode, the vivid and lively narrative by one of the voyage surgeons, David Samwell.

The Killing of History

... Gananath Obeyesekere , The Apotheosis of Captain Cook : European
Mythmaking in the Pacific , Princeton University Press , Princeton , 1992 33
Gananath Obeyesekere , The Apotheosis of Captain Cook , p 61 34 Gananath
Obeyesekere ...

The Killing of History

Seeks to prove that history is being perverted by literary and social theorists who believe that the past can only be perceived through our individual cultural interests, and attempts to separate fact from fiction to preserve the truth of events.

Empire Barbarism and Civilisation

Captain Cook, William Hodges and the Return to the Pacific Harriet Guest,
Lecturer Department of English Harriet Guest ... James Cook, explorer', Critical
Inquiry, 18, 4 (1992), 630–54 Obeyesekere, Gannath,The Apotheosis of Captain
Cook: ...

Empire  Barbarism  and Civilisation

An original and richly illustrated study of the pictorial and written representations of Cook's voyages.

Anna Seward and the End of the Eighteenth Century

Instead, Seward's poem adheres to the doctrine of separate spheres by
assigning Mrs. Cook a role as the domestic, feminine counterpart of her
adventurous husband. Captain Cook braved ice floes, tornados, and “human
fiends” to bring ...

Anna Seward and the End of the Eighteenth Century

Anna Seward and her career defy easy placement into the traditional periods of British literature. Raised to emulate the great poets John Milton and Alexander Pope, maturing in the Age of Sensibility, and publishing during the early Romantic era, Seward exemplifies the eighteenth-century transition from classical to Romantic. Claudia Thomas Kairoff’s excellent critical study offers fresh readings of Anna Seward’s most important writings and firmly establishes the poet as a pivotal figure among late-century British writers. Reading Seward’s writing alongside recent scholarship on gendered conceptions of the poetic career, patriotism, provincial culture, sensibility, and the sonnet revival, Kairoff carefully reconsiders Seward’s poetry and critical prose. Written as it was in the last decades of the eighteenth century, Seward’s work does not comfortably fit into the dominant models of Enlightenment-era verse or the tropes that characterize Romantic poetry. Rather than seeing this as an obstacle for understanding Seward’s writing within a particular literary style, Kairoff argues that this allows readers to see in Seward’s works the eighteenth-century roots of Romantic-era poetry. Arguably the most prominent woman poet of her lifetime, Seward’s writings disappeared from popular and scholarly view shortly after her death. After nearly two hundred years of critical neglect, Seward is attracting renewed attention, and with this book Kairoff makes a strong and convincing case for including Anna Seward's remarkable literary achievements among the most important of the late eighteenth century.

Available Light

Gananath Obeyesekere, The Apotheosis of Captain Cook: European
Mythmaking, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992; Marshall Sahlins, How
“Natives” Think, About Captain Cook, for Example, Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, ...

Available Light

Clifford Geertz, one of the most influential thinkers of our time, here discusses some of the most urgent issues facing intellectuals today. In this collection of personal and revealing essays, he explores the nature of his anthropological work in relation to a broader public, serving as the foremost spokesperson of his generation of scholars, those who came of age after World War II. His reflections are written in a style that both entertains and disconcerts, as they engage us in topics ranging from moral relativism to the relationship between cultural and psychological differences, from the diversity and tension among activist faiths to "ethnic conflict" in today's politics. Geertz, who once considered a career in philosophy, begins by explaining how he got swept into the revolutionary movement of symbolic anthropology. At that point, his work began to encompass not only the ethnography of groups in Southeast Asia and North Africa, but also the study of how meaning is made in all cultures--or, to use his phrase, to explore the "frames of meaning" in which people everywhere live out their lives. His philosophical orientation helped him to establish the role of anthropology within broader intellectual circles and led him to address the work of such leading thinkers as Charles Taylor, Thomas Kuhn, William James, and Jerome Bruner. In this volume, Geertz comments on their work as he explores questions in political philosophy, psychology, and religion that have intrigued him throughout his career but that now hold particular relevance in light of postmodernist thinking and multiculturalism. Available Light offers insightful discussions of concepts such as nation, identity, country, and self, with a reminder that like symbols in general, their meanings are not categorically fixed but grow and change through time and place. This book treats the reader to an analysis of the American intellectual climate by someone who did much to shape it. One can read Available Light both for its revelation of public culture in its dynamic, evolving forms and for the story it tells about the remarkable adventures of an innovator during the "golden years" of American academia.