The Architecture of Hunting

Introduction -- Hunting architecture -- Rangifer hunting and hunters -- The ancient Great Lakes: paleoenvironment and archaeology throughout the Pleistocene-Holocene transition -- Hunting architecture underwater: interdisciplinary ...

The Architecture of Hunting

"Combining underwater archaeology, terrestrial archaeology, and ethnographic and historical research, The Architecture of Hunting investigates the creation and use of hunting architecture by hunter-gatherers. Hunting architecture -- including blinds, drive lanes, and fishing weirs -- is a global phenomenon found across a broad spectrum of cultures, time, geography, and environments. Relying on similar behaviors in species such as caribou, bison, guanacos, antelope, and gazelles, cultures as diverse as Sami reindeer herders, the Inka, and ancient bison hunters on the North American plains have utilized such structures, combined with strategically situated landforms, to insure adequate food supplies and to successfully maintain a nomadic way of life. Ashley K. Lemke explores hunting architecture as a form of human niche construction and considers the myriad ways such built structures affect hunter-gatherer lifeways. Her research presents examples of hunting architecture from across the globe and how they influence forager mobility, territoriality, property, leadership, and labor aggregation. The book goes on to outline the archaeological investigation of hunting architecture in the past and provides new data on Ice Age caribou hunting structures preserved underneath the Great Lakes: some of oldest hunting architecture on the planet"--

The Architecture of Hunting

The Built Environment of Hunter-Gatherers and Its Impact on Mobility, Property, Leadership, and Labor Ashley Lemke ... Hunting architecture and its use is one means by which social complexity can arise in hunter-gatherer societies.

The Architecture of Hunting

As one of the most significant economic innovations in prehistory, hunting architecture radically altered life and society for hunter-gatherers. The development of these structures indicates that foragers designed their environments, had a deep knowledge of animal behavior, and interacted with each other in complex ways that reach beyond previous assumptions. Combining underwater archaeology, terrestrial archaeology, and ethnographic and historical research, The Architecture of Hunting investigates the creation and use of hunting architecture by hunter-gatherers. Hunting architecture—including blinds, drive lanes, and fishing weirs—is a global phenomenon found across a broad spectrum of cultures, time, geography, and environments. Relying on similar behaviors in species such as caribou, bison, guanacos, antelope, and gazelles, cultures as diverse as Sami reindeer herders, the Inka, and ancient bison hunters on the North American plains have employed such structures, combined with strategically situated landforms, to ensure adequate food supplies while maintaining a nomadic way of life. Using examples of hunting architecture from across the globe and how they influence forager mobility, territoriality, property, leadership, and labor aggregation, Ashley Lemke explores this architecture as a form of human niche construction and considers the myriad ways such built structures affect hunter-gatherer lifeways. Bringing together diverse sources under the single category of “hunting architecture,” The Architecture of Hunting serves as the new standard guide for anyone interested in hunter-gatherers and their built environment.

Archaeology of Domestic Architecture and the Human Use of Space

There is no doubt that spatiality in hunter-gatherer camps is indeed differentiated, with some areas more commonly occupied by specific genders and others used by all (e.g., see studies in Jarvenpa and Brumbach 2006).

Archaeology of Domestic Architecture and the Human Use of Space

This volume is the first text to focus specifically on the archaeology of domestic architecture. Covering major theoretical and methodological developments over recent decades in areas like social institutions, settlement types, gender, status, and power, this book addresses the developing understanding of where and how people in the past created and used domestic space. It will be a useful synthesis for scholars and an ideal text for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in archaeology and architecture. The book-covers the relationship of architectural decisions of ancient peoples with our understanding of social and cultural institutions;-includes cases from every continent and all time periods-- from the Paleolithic of Europe to present-day African villages;-is ideal for the growing number of courses on household archaeology, social archaeology, and historical and vernacular architecture.

Immaterial Architecture

As in the 1920s, architects today assume that space is a defining characteristic of architecture. ... Hunting the Shadow In The Ten Books on Architecture Vitruvius writes that knowledge of geometry, philosophy, music, medicine, ...

Immaterial Architecture

This fascinating argument from Jonathan Hill presents the case for the significance and importance of the immaterial in architecture. Architecture is generally perceived as the solid, physical matter that it unarguably creates, but what of the spaces it creates? This issue drives Hill's explorative look at the immaterial aspects of architecture. The book discusses the pressures on architecture and the architectural profession to be respectively solid matter and solid practice and considers concepts that align architecture with the immaterial, such as the superiority of ideas over matter, command of drawing and design of spaces and surfaces. Focusing on immaterial architecture as the perceived absence of matter, Hill devises new means to explore the creativity of both the user and the architect, advocating an architecture that fuses the immaterial and the material and considers its consequences, challenging preconceptions about architecture, its practice, purpose, matter and use. This is a useful and innovative read that encourages architects and students to think beyond established theory and practice.

The Architecture of the Stables and Country Mansions

John Birch (Architect.) List of Plates . Suggestive Designs for Two Elizabethan Mansions . ... Designs and Views of Shooting or Hunting Quarters . XXII . and XXIII . Ditto for Shooting Quarters . XXIV . and XXV .

The Architecture of the Stables and Country Mansions


The Architecture of Paris

He also needed bases from which to pursue that most royal of sports , hunting , and it was the beautiful Forêt de Fontainebleau that at- tracted him to this site , 65 km from the capital . He be- gan converting and enlarging ...

The Architecture of Paris

Over 300 buildings of the last 2000 years are presented.

The Architecture of Ruins

In November, he entertained friends and allies at a month-long 'Norfolk Congress' that combined hunting with political intrigue, social life and cultural patronage. Walpole's expenditure was lavish. In the vaulted ground floor Arcade ...

The Architecture of Ruins

The Architecture of Ruins: Designs on the Past, Present and Future identifies an alternative and significant history of architecture from the sixteenth century to the twenty-first century, in which a building is designed, occupied and imagined as a ruin. This design practice conceives a monument and a ruin as creative, interdependent and simultaneous themes within a single building dialectic, addressing temporal and environmental questions in poetic, psychological and practical terms, and stimulating questions of personal and national identity, nature and culture, weather and climate, permanence and impermanence and life and death. Conceiving a building as a dialogue between a monument and a ruin intensifies the already blurred relations between the unfinished and the ruined and envisages the past, the present and the future in a single architecture. Structured around a collection of biographies, this book conceives a monument and a ruin as metaphors for a life and means to negotiate between a self and a society. Emphasising the interconnections between designers and the particular ways in which later architects learned from earlier ones, the chapters investigate an evolving, interdisciplinary design practice to show the relevance of historical understanding to design. Like a history, a design is a reinterpretation of the past that is meaningful to the present. Equally, a design is equivalent to a fiction, convincing users to suspend disbelief. We expect a history or a novel to be written in words, but they can also be delineated in drawing, cast in concrete or seeded in soil. The architect is a ‘physical novelist’ as well as a ‘physical historian’. Like building sites, ruins are full of potential. In revealing not only what is lost, but also what is incomplete, a ruin suggests the future as well as the past. As a stimulus to the imagination, a ruin’s incomplete and broken forms expand architecture’s allegorical and metaphorical capacity, indicating that a building can remain unfinished, literally and in the imagination, focusing attention on the creativity of users as well as architects. Emphasising the symbiotic relations between nature and culture, a building designed, occupied and imagined as a ruin acknowledges the coproduction of multiple authors, whether human, non-human or atmospheric, and is an appropriate model for architecture in an era of increasing climate change.

The Architecture of Robert James Adam 1758 1794

JOHN BAXTER , ARCHITECT . In Hunter Square , close to the Tron Church , is the old Merchant Hall , a building which might easily be taken to be by Adam . It has been entirely altered on the ground floor , owing to the premises being ...

The Architecture of Robert   James Adam  1758 1794


The Architect

... of Darlington , is the architect . the Thames at Eton , " 16 by 10 , by B. Foster , 651. ; Cinderella , " by C. N. Henry , 541. 128. ; “ A Stableboy with Lantern , ” by W. Hunt , 841 .; Great Western Arcade , Birmingham .

The Architect


The Architecture of Jefferson Country

... 25, 303 n.72 Hudson, Christopher, 115 Hughes, Dr. John C, house, 15, 177, 192, 192 Hulfish house, 254 Hunt, Richard Morris, 253 Hunt, William D., 301 n.if Hunter, Rachael, 308 n.28 Hunter (Belfast architect-builder), 98 Huntington.

The Architecture of Jefferson Country

"But what is less well known are the many important examples of other architectural idioms built in this Piedmont Virginia county, many by nationally renowned architects.".

Spirit Hunter

One cinema - architecture responds to another as the nineteenth - century mansion of the heiress to the Winchester Repeating Rifle ... Spirit Hunter examines how its mythic haunting by violence reverberates today in America's wars .

Spirit Hunter

By Philip Monk.

Architecture and Nature

If we think back to the Boone and Crockett Club cabin there were hunting trophies everywhere, from the bison skull over the fireplace to the bearskins on the floor. The same was true with the lobby of Glacier Hotel.

Architecture and Nature

The word "nature" comes from natura, Latin for birth - as do the words nation, native and innate. But nature and nation share more than a common root, they share a common history where one term has been used to define the other. In the United States, the relationship between nation and nature has been central to its colonial and post-colonial history, from the idea of the noble savage to the myth of the frontier. Narrated, painted and filmed, American landscapes have been central to the construction of a national identity. This book offers an in-depth look at how changing ideas of what nature is and what it means for the country have been represented in buildings and landscapes over the past century. It begins with the close of the frontier and the rise of the conservation movement in the 1890s, and it ends with the opening of the "final" frontier of outer space and the rise of the ecology movement in the 1960s. In this seventy five year period, certain American myths about nature have endured while others have been invented, reworked or abandoned.; The buildings and landscapes that have resulted from this dynamic process represent the dreams and ambitions of the country for its relationship to nature: the architecture of the National Parks, the streamlined dams of the Tennessee Valley Authority, the modernist dream houses of post war California, and the geodesic domes of the countercultural sixties. Each of these buildings and landscapes were iconic representations in their era - symbolizing a perfect ideal for life in harmony with nature. Commissioned by either government or business interests, they can be seen as way stations in the development of a national identity. We explore the meanings of these seemingly familiar buildings from a new perspective, using them to shed light on the country's complex and often controversial relationship to nature.

The Architectural Heritage of the Malay World

One traditional Malay house stands out among the dwellings for its commanding architecture and rich historical values ( Figure 3.63 ) . This house is owned by Haji Mohamad Jali bin Lebai Mat Angga , a man known for his love of hunting ...

The Architectural Heritage of the Malay World


The Architecture Chronicle

We decide to visit the Nymphenburg, located at the edge of Munich amidst the former royal hunting grounds. There are a number of small, themed, hunting lodges distributed about the grounds. One has a huge marble bath in the basement, ...

The Architecture Chronicle

During the last 30 years, technological, social, economic and environmental changes have brought about the most dramatic evolution to architectural practice that has taken place since the profession emerged during the Italian Renaissance. Whilst these changes have transformed the way architects work, few contemporary books discuss architectural practice. The Architecture Chronicle sets out to define the role of the contemporary architect in the light of these changes. Most books on architecture start when a building is complete, carefully editing out any evidence of the design and production process. The Architecture Chronicle engages with the design and production process. It investigates how and by whom design decisions are made and executed. Chapter 1 is a diary reporting on the design and realisation of five stage sets and one urban intervention over a period of four years, starting on 16 December 2003. The diary is intercepted by references that are, where appropriate, carefully integrated in the overall narrative. Chapter 2 reflects on the diary to discover patterns and cross-references and to draw conclusions. The contemporary architect can be defined as three distinct characters. The architect-inventor challenges conventions and questions the social status quo. The architect-activist transgresses the boundary of the profession and enters the construction process. The architect-arbitrator engages the audience to realise the ambitious project. The Architecture Chronicle concludes that the contemporary architect still draws and writes, but that it is often the architect’s ability to engage and direct that asserts his or her status. To assert his or her status in the design team, the architect’s ability to talk and to act is more important than his or her ability to draw and write.

Structure and Architecture

Thanks are due to all those who supplied illustrations and especially to Pat Hunt, Tony Hunt, the late Alastair Hunter, ... Anthony Hunt Associates, the British Cement Association, the Architectural Association, the British Architecture ...

Structure and Architecture

'Structure and Architecture' is an essential textbook for students and practitioners of architecture and structural engineering. MacDonald explains the basic principles of structure and describes the ranges of structure types in current use. Furthermore, the book links these topics directly with the activity of architectural design and criticism. An update of the first edition, 'Structure and Architecture 2ed' includes a revised opening chapter, and a new section that discusses prominent buildings constructed since the last edition was published in 1994. Angus MacDonald deals with structures holistically, relating detailed topics back to the whole structure and building. He aims to answer the questions: What are architectural structures? How does one define the difference between the structure of a building and all of the other components and elements of which it consists? What are the requirements of structures? What is involved in their design? An understanding of the concepts involved in answering these questions and an appreciation of how the structure of a building functions enhances the ability of an individual to appreciate its architectural quality. This book is unique in that it discusses the structural component of architectural design in the context of visual and stylistic issues.

The Wife hunter Or Memoirs of M P s

The architect had evinced a magnanimous contempt for symmetry - not a single window on the upper storey was placed exactly over any of the windows on the ground floor ; some were large , others small , and the strange disparity of two ...

The Wife hunter  Or  Memoirs of  M P  s


Weather Architecture

127 Hunt, William Kent, pp. 64–65. Pray lay your Commands upon Kent, to send you the Short Dialogue I writ in his behalf between the General & myself, shewing the Cause why nobody takes notice of him when they speak of the Hermitage.

Weather Architecture

Weather Architecture further extends Jonathan Hill’s investigation of authorship by recognising the creativity of the weather. At a time when environmental awareness is of growing relevance, the overriding aim is to understand a history of architecture as a history of weather and thus to consider the weather as an architectural author that affects design, construction and use in a creative dialogue with other authors such as the architect and user. Environmental discussions in architecture tend to focus on the practical or the poetic but here they are considered together. Rather than investigate architecture’s relations to the weather in isolation, they are integrated into a wider discussion of cultural and social influences on architecture. The analysis of weather’s effects on the design and experience of specific buildings and gardens is interwoven with a historical survey of changing attitudes to the weather in the arts, sciences and society, leading to a critical re-evaluation of contemporary responses to climate change.

The British Architect

... Architect Some months ago the Corporation of Wigan issued an invita- should be paid by Commission , on which the mover of the tion to Architects to send in Competitive Designs for a new Resolution that Mr. HUNTER should be appointed ...

The British Architect


General Knowledge 2020

The Indo-Islamic style was neither Indian architecture, which has evolved through centuries, is the result of ... period saw great developments in the field of architecture. scenes, portraits, hunting scenes, lovers, battle fronts etc.

General Knowledge 2020

General Knowledge is an important section of several competitive exams. Keeping an updated knowledge of it helps not only in exams, but at every aspects of life. General Knowledge 2020 has been revised for aspirants preparing for various upcoming exams to enhance eir general awareness so at ey can tackle e questions asked from numerous areas. It covers key subjects including History, Geography, Indian Polity, Indian Economy, General Science, and General Knowledge, wi latest facts and updates supported by figures, graphics and tables. It also provides a highly useful section on Current Affairs at e beginning which promotes factual knowledge from recent happening occurred at different areas. Providing accurate, perfect and complete coverage of facts, it is a complete general knowledge book, useful for e preparation of SSC, Bank, Railway, Police, NDA/CDS and various oer competitive exams. TOC Current Affairs, Indian History, Geography, Indian Polity, Indian Economy, General Science, General Knowledge

Late Prehistoric Hunter Gatherers and Farmers of the Jornada Mogollon

Here I focus on architectural patterns to illustrate the multiple patterns characteristic of the Jornada. Many aspects of culture both shape and in turn are shaped by architecture; these span a spectrum from the physical function of ...

Late Prehistoric Hunter Gatherers and Farmers of the Jornada Mogollon

Often seen as geographically marginal and of limited research interest to archaeologists, the Jornada Mogollon region of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico deserves broader attention. Late Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers and Farmers of the Jornada Mogollon presents the major issues being addressed in Jornada research and reveals the complex, dynamic nature of Jornada prehistory. The Jornada branch of the Mogollon culture and its inhabitants played a significant economic, political, and social role at multiple scales. This volume draws together results from recent large-scale CRM work that has amassed among the largest data sets in the Southwest with up-to-date chronological, architectural, faunal, ceramic, obsidian sourcing, and other specialized studies. Chapters by some of the most active researchers in the area address topics that reach beyond the American Southwest, such as mobility, forager adaptations, the transition to farming, responses to environmental challenges, and patterns of social interaction. Late Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers and Farmers of the Jornada Mogollon is an up-to-date summary of the major developments in the region and their implications for Southwest archaeology in particular and anthropological archaeological research more generally. The publication of this book is supported in part by the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society and the Center for Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware. Contributors: Rafael Cruz Antillón, Douglas H. M. Boggess, Peter C. Condon, Linda Scott Cummings, Moira Ernst, Tim Graves, David V. Hill, Nancy A. Kenmotsu, Shaun M. Lynch, Arthur C. MacWilliams, Mary Malainey, Timothy D. Maxwell, Myles R. Miller, John Montgomery, Jim A. Railey, Thomas R. Rocek, Matt Swanson, Christopher A. Turnbow, Javier Vasquez, Regge N. Wiseman, Chad L. Yost