The Architecture of the Roman Empire

Examines Roman architecture as a party of overall urban design and looks at arches, public buildings, tombs, columns, stairs, plazas, and streets

The Architecture of the Roman Empire

Examines Roman architecture as a party of overall urban design and looks at arches, public buildings, tombs, columns, stairs, plazas, and streets

The Architecture of the Roman Empire An introductory study

ARCHITECTURE THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE Volume I : An Introductory Study , Revised Edition William L. MacDonald Hailed when it was first issued as a comprehensive and penetrating account of the rise of Roman Imperial ...

The Architecture of the Roman Empire  An introductory study

Examines Roman architecture as a party of overall urban design and looks at arches, public buildings, tombs, columns, stairs, plazas, and streets

Innovative Vaulting in the Architecture of the Roman Empire

Mozia 6 (Studi Semitici 37, Rome): 7–47. Tusa, V. 2000. “Il santuario fenicio-punico di Mozia, detto di Cappiddazzu,” In M. E. Aubet and M. Barth ́elemy, eds. Actas del IV Congreso internazional de estudios fenicios y punicos 4 (Cádiz): ...

Innovative Vaulting in the Architecture of the Roman Empire

This book on Roman construction explains why and how Roman builders employed a set of unusual vaulting techniques and explores why each is confined to a particular area of the Empire. It is written to be accessible to advanced students as well as experts in the field.

The Architecture of Rome

An Architectural History in 400 Individual Presentations Professor of Transnational Private and European Business Law ... under Alaric took Rome in 410 , destroying a great deal – meant that only very few secular buildings were erected ...

The Architecture of Rome

Architects and artists have always acknowledged over the centuries that Rome is rightly called the 'eternal city'. Rome is eternal above all because it was always young, always 'in its prime'. Here the buildings that defined the West appeared over more than 2000 years, here the history of European architecture was written. The foundations were laid even in ancient Roman times, when the first attempts were made to design interiors and thus make space open to experience as something physical. And at that time the Roman architects also started to develop building types that are still valid today, thus creating the cornerstone of later Western architecture. In it Rome's primacy remained unbroken -- whether it was with old St Peter's as the first medieval basilica or new St. Peter's as the building in which Bramante and Michelangelo developed the High Renaissance, or with works by Bernini and Borromini whose rich and lucid spatial forms were to shape Baroque as far as Vienna, Bohemia and Lower Franconia, and also with Modern buildings, of which there are many unexpected pearls to be found in Rome. All this is comprehensible only if it is presented historically, i. e. in chronological sequence, and so the guide has not been arranged topographically as usual but chronologically.This means that one is not led in random sequence from a Baroque building to an ancient or a modern one, but the historical development is followed successively. Every epoch is preceded by an introduction that identifies its key features. This produces a continuous, lavishly illustrated history of the architecture of Rome -- and thus at the same time of the whole of the West. Practical handling is guaranteed by an alphabetical index and detailed maps, whose information does not just immediately illustrate the historical picture, but also makes it possible to choose a personal route through history.

Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire

LEPCIS MAGNA, for example, received baths, and building programs in the provinces increased during the late empire. Rome was deemphasized as an artistic or architectural center in direct proportion to imperial aspirations and attention ...

Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire

Not much has happened in the Roman Empire since 1994 that required the first edition to be updated, but Bunson, a prolific reference and history author, has revised it, incorporated new findings and thinking, and changed the dating style to C.E. (Common Era) and B.C.E. (Before Common Era). For the 500 years from Julius Caesar and the Gallic Wars in 59-51 B.C.E. to the fall of the empire in the west in 476 C.E, he discusses personalities, terms, sites, and events. There is very little cross-referencing.

The Roman Empire

under Chapter 6 , and on trade routes see M.P. Charlesworth , Trade Routes and Commerce of the Roman Empire ( 2nd ed . ... architecture and art , brilliantly related to social history , see Mortimer Wheeler , Roman Art and Architecture ...

The Roman Empire

Offers a history of the Roman Empire from 44 B.C. to A.D. 235.

Roman Architecture

Bibliography General ANDERSON, W.J., Architecture of Greece and Rome, II, The Architecture of Ancient Rome, by W. J. Anderson and R. P. Spiers, rev. T. Ashby, London 1927. ANDREAE. B., The Art of Rome, London 1978.

Roman Architecture

In this comprehensive, accessible and beautifully illustrated book, Frank Sear traces the evolution of Roman architecture during the four centuries from the late Republic to AD 330, when Constantine moved the empire's capital to Constantinople. With over 200 diagrams, maps and photos, this lucid and eminently readable account is a detailed overview of the development of architecture from Augustine to Constantine. Covering building techniques and materials as well as architecture and patronage, features include: * deployment of the most recent archaeological evidence * consideration of building materials and methods used by Roman engineers and architects * examination of stylistic innovations * analysis of the historical and cultural contexts of Roman architecture * detailed exploration of key Roman sites including Ostia and Pompeii. In high demand since its initial publication, this book will not disappoint in its purpose to educate and delight those in the field of Roman architecture.

Art in the Roman Empire

Moreover, even at Rome itself the architects were not always, or usually, Romans. We do not, for the most part, know their names. But we do happen to be told, as was mentioned earlier, that the architect of Trajan at Rome, and designer ...

Art in the Roman Empire

Michael Grant has specially selected some of the most significant examples of painting, portraits, architecture, mosaic, jewellery and silverware, to give a unique insight into the functions and manifestations of art in the Roman Empire. Art in the Roman Empire shows how many of the most impressive masterpieces were produced outside Rome, on the frontiers of its enormous empire.

A Dictionary of the Roman Empire

Architecture The Augustan Age The architecture of the Augustan Age was among the finest in the history of the Empire . Rome itself was almost completely rebuilt in this period . Whereas a definite Latin element and remnants of Style II ...

A Dictionary of the Roman Empire

The extraordinarily rich cultural legacy of the Roman world has had a profound affect world civilization. Roman achievements in architecture, law, politics, literature, war, and philosophy serve as the foundation of modern Western society. Now, for the first time in an A-Z format, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire assembles the people, places, events, and ideas of this remarkable period in one easy-to-use source. With over 1,900 entries covering more than five hundred years of Roman history, from Julius Caesar and the Gallic Wars (59-51 B.C.) to the fall of Romulus Augustus, the last Roman emperor (476 A.D.), this accessible guide provides quick reference to one of the most studied periods of all antiquity. Every aspect of Roman life is included. Here are profiles of the great emperors, such as Marcus Aurelius, one of the most profoundly intellectual monarchs in western civilization, and the aberrant Gaius Caligula, who, after draining the Roman treasury with his eccentric behavior, made it a capital crime for citizens not to bequeath him their estates. Informative entries describe the complex workings of Roman government, such as census taking, the creation of civil service, coinage, and the venerable institution of the Senate, and offer insight into the various trends and cultural tastes that developed throughout Roman history. For example, a discussion on baths, the most common type of building in the Roman Empire, demonstrates the unique intermingling of luxury, community, recreation, and, in the provinces, an association with Rome, that served as the focus of any city aspiring to greatness. Other entries describe the practice of paganism, marriage and divorce, ludi (public games held to entertain the Roman populace), festivals of the Roman year, and gluttony (epitomized by famous gourmands such as the emperor Vitellius, who according to the historian Suetonius, lived for food, banqueting three or four times a day, routinely vomiting up his meal and starting over). Also featured are longer essays on such topics as art and architecture, gods and goddesses, and the military, as well as a chronology, a short glossary of Roman terms, and appendices listing the emperors of the Empire and diagram the often intertwined family trees of ruling dynasties. Comprehensive, authoritative, and illustrated with over sixty illustrations and maps, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire provides easy access to the remarkable civilization upon which Western society was built.

Monumentality and the Roman Empire

Architecture in the Antonine Age Edmund Thomas. La Rocca, E., La riva a mezzaluna: culti, agoni, monumentifunerari presso il Tevere nel Campo Marzio occidentale (Rome, 1984). ——'“Disiecta membra Neroniana”. L'arco Partico di Nerone sul ...

Monumentality and the Roman Empire

'Monumentality and the Roman Age' presents a study of the concept of monumentality in classical antiquity, asks what it is that the notion encompasses and how significant it was for the Romans themselves in moulding their individual or collective aspirations and identities.

Roman Architecture

Published as a companion volume to Diana E. E. Kleiner's course on Roman Architecture given through Coursera (first offered in January 2014 but based on a class she has long taught at Yale), this enhanced e-book explores not only Rome but ...

Roman Architecture

At its most expansive, the Roman Empire stretched from the British Isles to Egypt; Rome was the ancient world's greatest superpower. Roman Architecture: A Visual Guide is an illustrated introduction to the great buildings and engineering marvels of Rome and its empire. Published as a companion volume to Diana E. E. Kleiner's course on Roman Architecture given through Coursera (first offered in January 2014 but based on a class she has long taught at Yale), this enhanced e-book explores not only Rome but also buildings preserved at Pompeii, Herculaneum, Ostia, Tivoli, North Italy, Sicily, France, Spain, Germany, Greece, Turkey, Croatia, Jordan, Lebanon, and North Africa. Beginning with the birth of Rome as an Iron Age village, Roman Architecture traces the growth and expansion of the Roman Empire through its cities, which featured civic, religious, commercial, entertainment, and residential districts in the urban setting. A valuable resource for both the student and the traveler, Roman Architecture features over 250 photographs and site plans of the most intriguing and consequential buildings in the Roman Empire. These are presented from the fresh perspective of an author who has journeyed to nearly all of the sites, revealing most of them through her own digital images. In addition, this interactive e-book makes learning about these monuments easier than ever, with handy maps and geolocation links that show you just where the monuments are and, if you're traveling, how to get there. Suitable for the classroom and as a guidebook, Roman Architecture is a fascinating introduction to some of history's most compelling and influential architecture.

The Pantheon

Describes the building of the Pantheon, discussing the role of the Roman emperor Hadrian and the significance of the Pantheon in the fields of history and architecture.

The Pantheon

Describes the building of the Pantheon, discussing the role of the Roman emperor Hadrian and the significance of the Pantheon in the fields of history and architecture.

Roman Imperial Architecture

The history of Roman Imperial architecture is one of the interaction of two dominant themes: in Rome itself the emergence of a new architecture based on the use of a revolutionary new material, Roman concrete; and in the provinces, the ...

Roman Imperial Architecture

The history of Roman Imperial architecture is one of the interaction of two dominant themes: in Rome itself the emergence of a new architecture based on the use of a revolutionary new material, Roman concrete; and in the provinces, the development of interrelated but distinctive Romano-provicial schools. The metropolitan school, exemplified in the Pantheon, the Imperial Baths, and the apartment houses of Ostia, constitutes Rome's great original contribution. The role of the provinces ranged from the preservation of a lively Hellenistic tradition to the assimilation of ideas from the east and from the military frontiers. It was--finally--Late Roman architecture that transmitted the heritage of Greece and Rome to the medieval world.

The Oxford Companion to Archaeology

608 on ROMAN EMPIRE: Introduction Another important manifestation of this tendency to reinvent classicism can be seen in Rome's interest in developing a decorative architecture through novel and unusual combinations of the traditional ...

The Oxford Companion to Archaeology


Rome Is Burning

“Nero's 'Solar' Kingship and the Architecture of the Domus Aurea.” Numen 63: 511–24. Hanslik, R. 1963. ... In M. Henig, ed., Architecture and Architectural Sculpture in the Roman Empire. Oxford: Oxford University Committee for ...

Rome Is Burning

Drawing on new archaeological evidence, an authoritative history of Rome’s Great Fire—and how it inflicted lasting harm on the Roman Empire According to legend, the Roman emperor Nero set fire to his majestic imperial capital on the night of July 19, AD 64 and fiddled while the city burned. It’s a story that has been told for more than two millennia—and it’s likely that almost none of it is true. In Rome Is Burning, distinguished Roman historian Anthony Barrett sets the record straight, providing a comprehensive and authoritative account of the Great Fire of Rome, its immediate aftermath, and its damaging longterm consequences for the Roman world. Drawing on remarkable new archaeological discoveries and sifting through all the literary evidence, he tells what is known about what actually happened—and argues that the disaster was a turning point in Roman history, one that ultimately led to the fall of Nero and the end of the dynasty that began with Julius Caesar. Rome Is Burning tells how the fire destroyed much of the city and threw the population into panic. It describes how it also destroyed Nero’s golden image and provoked a financial crisis and currency devaluation that made a permanent impact on the Roman economy. Most importantly, the book surveys, and includes many photographs of, recent archaeological evidence that shows visible traces of the fire’s destruction. Finally, the book describes the fire’s continuing afterlife in literature, opera, ballet, and film. A richly detailed and scrupulously factual narrative of an event that has always been shrouded in myth, Rome Is Burning promises to become the standard account of the Great Fire of Rome for our time.

Civilization of the Ancient Mediterranean

At the command of the emperors, these men transformed Rome, creating the large-scale, richly articulated, ... and Itinerario di Roma antica (1970); William L. MacDonald, The Architecture of the Roman Empire, I, 2d ed.

Civilization of the Ancient Mediterranean

Essays covering the full range of topics on the people, customs, government, religion and arts of the ancient world.

Mosaics of the Greek and Roman World

This book provides a comprehensive account of mosaics in the ancient world from the early pebble mosaics of Greece to the pavements of Christian churches in the East.

Mosaics of the Greek and Roman World

The first major study in English of the art of mosaics in antiquity.

Ancient Rome

An authoritative and accessible account of Roman imperial, military and political power, and of classical Rome's far-reaching influence in art, architecture and culture; illustrated with 1000 photographs, paintings, maps and battleplans.

Ancient Rome

An authoritative and accessible account of Roman imperial, military and political power, and of classical Rome's far-reaching influence in art, architecture and culture; illustrated with 1000 photographs, paintings, maps and battleplans.

A Profile of Ancient Rome

Illustrations, text, and reproductions of historical items provide an overview of the history and culture of ancient Rome, including information on its sites, monuments, protagonists, religion, language, political and legal system, armies, ...

A Profile of Ancient Rome

Offering an overview of all facets of ancient Roman society, this volume includes chapters devoted to the economy & social system, art & architecture, & the everyday life of the inhabitants.