Art and the Aristocrat

Thanks to Toni Goffe and Becky Goosey, whose artistic genius has once again brought to life Art's fabulous world; to my editor, Andy Booth, who is a genuine genius in all things literary; to my wife Hannah, my live-in proof reader, ...

Art and the Aristocrat


The Aristocrat as Art

Domna Stanton discusses self-fashioning among French aristocrats in the seventeenth century.

The Aristocrat as Art

Domna Stanton discusses self-fashioning among French aristocrats in the seventeenth century.

Paper Maker and British Paper Trade Journal

Art , NAME . which is used for the cheapest class of printing work where real quality has to be subservient to price . ... Two other a well - known name and its history has been recorded qualities , also aristocrats of their type ...

Paper Maker and British Paper Trade Journal


Art Life Nature in Japan

The aristocrats composed Chinese poems and played the game of go; the others wrote the hokku, the vernacular poetry of seventeen syllables, and played Japanese chess. The two classes were necessarily unlike in their artistic tastes and ...

Art  Life   Nature in Japan

The artistic and philosophical heritage of Japan has a special meaning for the modern world. During the present century, Japanese thought and Japanese art have exerted a strong influence on the western mind. Art, Life, and Nature in Japan takes us to the roots of Japanese culture and the origins of this influence. In this brief but deeply meaningful book Masaharu Anesaki provides a panoramic view of Japanese culture, with particular emphasis on the spirit of Japanese art. The book has, in fact, established itself as a classic, and it ranks with such other valuable works of its time as The Book of Tea, in which Kakuzo Okakura deals with a similar theme. Anesaki expresses himself in crystal-clear English to convey a message that is significant today as it was before World War II, when his book first appeared. He advocates peace and a turning inward to the beauty of art and nature. He is as familiar with the Zen philosophy of the samurai and the tea master as with sentiments of ancient court noblemen and the quiet thought of a humble peasant.

Psychosomatic Disorders in Seventeenth Century French Literature

2 According to Domna C. Stanton, The Aristocrat as Art: A Study of the Honnête Homme and the Dandy in Seventeenth- and Nineteenth-Century French Literature (new York: Columbia University Press, 1980), honnêteté is a secular ideal, ...

Psychosomatic Disorders in Seventeenth Century French Literature

Bernadette Höfer's innovative and ambitious monograph argues that the epistemology of the Cartesian mind/body dualism, and its insistence on the primacy of analytic thought over bodily function, has surprisingly little purchase in texts by prominent classical writers. In this study Höfer explores how Surin, Molière, Lafayette, and Racine represent interconnections of body and mind that influence behaviour, both voluntary and involuntary, and that thus disprove the classical notion of the mind as distinct from and superior to the body. The author's interdisciplinary perspective utilizes early modern medical and philosophical treatises, as well as contemporary medical compilations in the disciplines of psychosomatic medicine, neurobiology, and psychoanalysis, to demonstrate that these seventeenth-century French writers established a view of human existence that fully anticipates current thought regarding psychosomatic illness.

European Aestheticism and Spanish American Modernismo

redefines the role of the artist, protests the commodification and consumption of art, and promotes the philosophy of art for art's sake so as to critique specific aspects of industrial capitalist life. It is important to note that one ...

European Aestheticism and Spanish American Modernismo

Locating a shared interest in the philosophy of "art for art's sake" in aestheticism and modernismo , this study examines the changing role of art and artist during the turn-of-the-century period, offering a consideration of the multiple dichotomies of art and life, aesthetics and economics, production and consumption, and center and periphery.

The Aristocrat

The art of printing , and of making gun powder , was doubtlessly known ten thousand years ago ; of course the secret died away in the lapse of age , like that of the Greek fire , and indeed every thing else .

The Aristocrat


Picturing Marie Leszczinska 1703 1768

The Exceptional Woman: Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun and the Cultural Politics of Art. Chicago, IL: University of ... The Aristocrat as Art: A Study of the Honnête Homme and the Dandy in Seventeenth- and Nineteenth-Century French Literature.

Picturing Marie Leszczinska  1703 1768

Portraits of Queen Marie Leszczinska (1703-1768) were highly visible in eighteenth-century France. Appearing in royal ch?aux and, after 1737, in the Parisian Salons, the queen's image was central to the visual construction of the monarchy. Her earliest portraits negotiated aspects of her ethnic difference, French gender norms, and royal rank to craft an image of an appropriate consort to the king. Later portraits by Maurice-Quentin de La Tour, Carle Van Loo, and Jean-Marc Nattier contributed to changing notions of queenship over the course of her 43 year tenure. Whether as royal wife, devout consort, or devoted mother, Marie Leszczinska's image mattered. While she has often been seen as a weak consort, this study argues that queenly images were powerful and even necessary for Louis XV's projection of authority. This is the first study dedicated to analyzing the queen's portraits. It engages feminist theory while setting the queen's image in the context of portraiture in France, courtly factional conflict, and the history of the French monarchy. While this investigation is historically specific, it raises the larger problem of the power of women's images versus the empowerment of women, a challenge that continues to plague the representation of political women today.

The Aesthetic Body

Strosetzki ( 85-92 ) too asserts that rhetoric shifts from deliberative and judicial forms to worldly epideixis , that is , to an art de plaire ( art of pleasing ) . 7. Marc Fumaroli , " De l'âge de l'éloquence à l'âge de la ...

The Aesthetic Body

Those two developments converge to construct an aesthetic body; that is, in its full etymological sense, a body whose principal functions are the production of sensation and affectivity. This study examines the importance of the body in the determination of sensibility and passion in French culture of the seventeenth century." "The Aesthetic Body will engage readers with interests in literature, philosophy, the history of ideas, the history of science and medicine, cultural history, and political theory of the French early modem period."--Jacket.

Kleist s Aristocratic Heritage and Das K thchen von Heilbronn

In any case , he instinctively sought death on the battlefield , thus attempting to follow the example of his ancestor Ewald Christian von Kleist . 74 Stanton , The Aristocrat as Art , 2 . 75 Kautsky , " Funktionen , " 9 .

Kleist s Aristocratic Heritage and Das K  thchen von Heilbronn

Kleist was an important dramatist at the beginning of the nineteenth century and Käthchen was one of his greatest stage successes. Reeve presents a brief outline of the Kleist family involvement in the Prussian aristocracy and Kleist's reactions to his background. He also surveys the literary critics' attempts to come to terms with Käthchen, noting a revisionist trend which associates Kleist with the bourgeois liberalism of his time. While acknowledging the influence of the German Enlightenment, Reeve argues that the most significant influence on Kleist was his noble heritage. Reeve's close textual analysis of Das Käthchen von Heilbronn uses the model of the aristocrat which draws upon Nietzsche's Was ist vornehm? and the works of Anthony Ludovici, John H. Kautsky, and others, a model which has remained virtually unchanged since the Middle Ages. Reeve examines Kleist's use of symbolic and descriptive names in Käthchen, showing how they emphasize his ties to the aristocratic, and compares Kleist's drama to two other plays featuring socially forbidden love, Friedrich Schiller's Kabale und Liebe and Friedrich Hebbel's Agnes Bernauer. Despite his efforts to the contrary, Heinrich von Kleist was unable to ignore or deny his aristocratic heritage. It left an indelible mark on his works, especially, as Reeve demonstrates, Das Käthchen von Heilbronn.

The Art Collector

A Current Record of Art , Bibliography , Antiquarianism , Etc. PUBLISHED SEMI - MONTHLY . ... In 1880 he had some companion of the aristocrats of art and letters , and a student of a etchings in the Croquis Parisiens published by ...

The Art Collector


Duchamp and the Aesthetics of Chance

Art as Experiment Herbert Molderings. first comprehensive laudatory treatise on the philosopher as the guid- ing intellectual force behind aesthetic and aristocratic anarchism.6 Thereafter, Stirner's ideas were publicized regularly in ...

Duchamp and the Aesthetics of Chance

Situating Duchamp firmly within the literature & philosophy of his time, Herbert Molderings recaptures the spirit of a frequently misread artist & his aesthetic of chance.

The Art Journal

THE MANNERS OF THE LATIN AND ANGLO - SAXON RACES CONSIDERED AS A FINE ART . ... A completely cultivated mind lesson , and an inspiration to try to elevate his own standard of and person is God's elected aristocrat .

The Art Journal


The art journal London

THE MANNERS OF THE LATIN AND ANGLO - SAXON RACES CONSIDERED AS A FINE ART . ... A completely cultivated mind lesson , and an inspiration to try to elevate his own standard of and person is God's elected aristocrat .

The art journal London


Performativity and Performance in Baroque Rome

Stanton, Domna, The Aristocrat as Art, New York, 1980. Stefani, Gino, Musica e religione nell'Italia barocca, Palermo, 1975. Steinberg, Leo, 'A Corner of the Last Judgment', Daedalus, 109 (Spring 1980), pp. 207–73.

Performativity and Performance in Baroque Rome

A new interest in the study of early modern ritual, ceremony, formations of personal and collective identities, social roles, and the production of meaning inside and outside the arts have made it possible to talk today about a performative turn in the humanities. In Performativity and Performance in Baroque Rome, scholars from different fields of research explore performative aspects of Baroque culture. With examples from the politics of diplomacy and everyday life, from theatre, music and ritual as well as from architecture, painting and sculpture the contributors demonstrate how broadly the concept of performativity has been adopted within different disciplines.

Mendacity and the Figure of the Liar in Seventeenth Century French Comedy

4 For studies on the honnête homme, see especially, Domna Stanton, The Aristocrat as Art: A Study of the 'Honnête homme' and the Dandy in Seventeenth- and Nineteenth-Century French Literature (New York: Columbia homme et la University ...

Mendacity and the Figure of the Liar in Seventeenth Century French Comedy

The first book-length study devoted to this topic, Mendacity and the Figure of the Liar in Seventeenth-Century French Comedy offers an important contribution to scholarship on the theatre as well as on early modern attitudes in France, specifically on the subject of lying and deception. Unusually for a scholarly work on seventeenth-century theatre, it is particularly alert to plays as performed pieces and not simply printed texts. The study also distinguishes itself by offering original readings of Molière alongside innovative analyses of other playwrights. The chapters offer fresh insights on well-known plays by Molière and Pierre Corneille but also invite readers to discover lesser-known works of the time (by writers such as Benserade, Thomas Corneille, Dufresny and Rotrou). Through comparative and sustained close readings, including a linguistic and speech act approach, a historical survey of texts with an analysis of different versions and a study of irony, the reader is shown the manifest ways in which different playwrights incorporate the comedic tropes of lying and scheming, confusion and unmasking. Drawing particular attention to the levels of communicative or mis-communicative exchanges on the character-to-character axis and the character-to-audience axis, this work examines the process whereby characters in the comedies construct narratives designed to trick, misdirect, dazzle, confuse or exploit their interlocutors. In the different incarnations of seducer, parasite, cross-dresser, duplicitous narrator/messenger and deluded mythomaniac, the author underscores the way in which the figure of the liar both entertains and troubles, making it a fascinating subject worthy of detailed investigation.

Fashioning Masculinity

See also Stanton, Aristocrat as Art. Baldessare Castiglione, The Book of the Courtier, Eng. trans., Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1967, pp. 76–81, 213–214; Faret, L'Art de Plaire, pp. 88–89. Morvan de Bellegarde, Modèles de conversation, p.3.

Fashioning Masculinity

The fashioning of English gentlemen in the eighteenth century was modelled on French practices of sociability and conversation. Michele Cohen shows how at the same time, the English constructed their cultural relations with the French as relations of seduction and desire. She argues that this produced anxiety on the part of the English over the effect of French practices on English masculinity and the virtue of English women. By the end of the century, representing the French as an effeminate other was integral to the forging of English, masculine national identity. Michele Cohen examines the derogation of women and the French which accompanied the emergent 'masculine' English identity. While taciturnity became emblematic of the English gentleman's depth of mind and masculinity, sprightly conversation was seen as representing the shallow and inferior intellect of English women and the French of both sexes. Michele Cohen also demonstrates how visible evidence of girls' verbal and language learning skills served only to construe the female mind as inferior. She argues that this perception still has currency today.

Baroque Self Invention and Historical Truth

Body Criticism: Imaging the Unseen in Enlightenment Art and Medicine (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1991) Stanton, Domna C. The Aristocrat as Art: A Study of the Honnête Homme and the Dandy in Seventeenth and NineteenthCentury France (New ...

Baroque Self Invention and Historical Truth

In his monumental study, Christopher Braider explores the dialectical contest between history and truth that defines the period of cultural transition called the 'baroque'. For example, Annibale Carracci's portrayal of the Stoic legend of Hercules at the Crossroads departs from earlier, more static representations that depict an emblematic demigod who has already rejected the fallen path of worldly Pleasure for the upward road of heroic Virtue. Braider argues that, in breaking with tradition in order to portray a tragic soliloquist whose dominant trait is agonized indecision, Carracci joins other baroque artists, poets and philosophers in rehearsing the historical dilemma of choice itself. Carracci's picture thus becomes a framing device that illuminates phenomena as diverse as the construction of gender in baroque painting and science, the Pauline ontology of art in Caravaggio and Rembrandt, the metaphysics of baroque soliloquy and the dismantling of Cartesian dualism in Cyrano de Bergerac and Pascal.

The Artist

Mr. Selwyn Image Lectures at the Art Aristocrat . “ Students must present their creand Crafts , on the Dangers of Cliques in dentials . " Art . Socialist . Work to its last detail is thorough . Nov. 20. -N.E.A.C. opens - Sending in Day ...

The Artist


The Labor of the Mind

Four books have been particularly important for my purposes: Domna C. Stanton, The Aristocrat as Art: A Study of the Honnête Homme and the Dandy in Seventeenthand Nineteenth-Century French Literature (New York, 1980); Myriam ...

The Labor of the Mind

How did educated and cultivated men in early modern France and Britain perceive and value their own and women's cognitive capacities, and how did women in their circles challenge those perceptions, if only by revaluing the kinds of intelligence attributed to them? What was thought to distinguish the "manly mind" from the feminine mind? How did awareness of these questions inform various kinds of published and unpublished texts, including the philosophical treatise, the dialogue, the polite essay, and the essay in literary criticism? The Labor of the Mind plumbs the social and cultural logic of the Enlightenment's trope of the manly mind; offers new readings of the textual representations of it; and examines the ways in which the trope was subverted or at least subtly questioned. With close readings of the writings of well-known and less familiar men and women, including Poullain de la Barre, The Third Earl of Shaftesbury, Madeleine de Scudéry, David Hume, Antoine-Léonard Thomas, Suzanne Curchod Necker, Denis Diderot, and Louise d'Epinay, and tracing their social networks and friendships, Anthony J. La Vopa explores the problematic opposition between mental labor as concentrated and sustained work, a labor of abstraction and judgment for which only men had the strength, and an aesthetic of effortless and tasteful play in polite conversation in which women were thought to excel. Covering nearly a century and a half of cultural and intellectual life from France to England and Scotland and then back again, La Vopa locates, beneath the tenacity of assumed natural differences, a lexicon imbued with ambivalence, ambiguity, and argument. The Labor of the Mind reveals the legacy for modernity of a fraught gendering of intellectual labor.