The Artist in the Machine

Miller argues that computers can already be as creative as humans—and someday will surpass us. But this is not a dystopian account; Miller celebrates the creative possibilities of artificial intelligence in art, music, and literature.

The Artist in the Machine

An authority on creativity introduces us to AI-powered computers that are creating art, literature, and music that may well surpass the creations of humans. Today's computers are composing music that sounds “more Bach than Bach,” turning photographs into paintings in the style of Van Gogh's Starry Night, and even writing screenplays. But are computers truly creative—or are they merely tools to be used by musicians, artists, and writers? In this book, Arthur I. Miller takes us on a tour of creativity in the age of machines. Miller, an authority on creativity, identifies the key factors essential to the creative process, from “the need for introspection” to “the ability to discover the key problem.” He talks to people on the cutting edge of artificial intelligence, encountering computers that mimic the brain and machines that have defeated champions in chess, Jeopardy!, and Go. In the central part of the book, Miller explores the riches of computer-created art, introducing us to artists and computer scientists who have, among much else, unleashed an artificial neural network to create a nightmarish, multi-eyed dog-cat; taught AI to imagine; developed a robot that paints; created algorithms for poetry; and produced the world's first computer-composed musical, Beyond the Fence, staged by Android Lloyd Webber and friends. But, Miller writes, in order to be truly creative, machines will need to step into the world. He probes the nature of consciousness and speaks to researchers trying to develop emotions and consciousness in computers. Miller argues that computers can already be as creative as humans—and someday will surpass us. But this is not a dystopian account; Miller celebrates the creative possibilities of artificial intelligence in art, music, and literature.

Thinking Like A Machine

By eliminating the predominant rationality of the machine, he gives it a new meaning. This book is the first monograph on the artist’s oeuvre. Internationally renowned experts shed light on the many facets of his work.

Thinking Like A Machine

In many modes of behavior, people act more and more like machines. In the context of work, people have become a human resource that can be replaced at any time. An existence without purpose cannot be imagined – just as a machine without function is absurd. Do humans already think like machines? Do they have a "master-slave" relationship with them? Are humans no longer any more than an organic prosthetic fitted to an inorganic body? With his created robotic beings, Niki Passath breaks with this seemingly rational technological system. By eliminating the predominant rationality of the machine, he gives it a new meaning. This book is the first monograph on the artist’s oeuvre. Internationally renowned experts shed light on the many facets of his work.

Art in the Age of Machine Learning

In this book, transdisciplinary artist-researcher Sofian Audry examines artistic practices at the intersection of machine learning and new media art, providing conceptual tools and historical perspectives for new media artists, musicians, ...

Art in the Age of Machine Learning

An examination of machine learning art and its practice in new media art and music. Over the past decade, an artistic movement has emerged that draws on machine learning as both inspiration and medium. In this book, transdisciplinary artist-researcher Sofian Audry examines artistic practices at the intersection of machine learning and new media art, providing conceptual tools and historical perspectives for new media artists, musicians, composers, writers, curators, and theorists. Audry looks at works from a broad range of practices, including new media installation, robotic art, visual art, electronic music and sound, and electronic literature, connecting machine learning art to such earlier artistic practices as cybernetics art, artificial life art, and evolutionary art. Machine learning underlies computational systems that are biologically inspired, statistically driven, agent-based networked entities that program themselves. Audry explains the fundamental design of machine learning algorithmic structures in terms accessible to the nonspecialist while framing these technologies within larger historical and conceptual spaces. Audry debunks myths about machine learning art, including the ideas that machine learning can create art without artists and that machine learning will soon bring about superhuman intelligence and creativity. Audry considers learning procedures, describing how artists hijack the training process by playing with evaluative functions; discusses trainable machines and models, explaining how different types of machine learning systems enable different kinds of artistic practices; and reviews the role of data in machine learning art, showing how artists use data as a raw material to steer learning systems and arguing that machine learning allows for novel forms of algorithmic remixes.

When the Machine Made Art

For Schwartz, the “qualitative sensations of the creative act remain the elusive domain ofthe artist.”60 Even though the computer was a powerful tool in the analysis of art, the artist, as author and originator, held the primary ...

When the Machine Made Art

Considering how culturally indispensable digital technology is today, it is ironic that computer-generated art was attacked when it burst onto the scene in the early 1960s. In fact, no other twentieth-century art form has elicited such a negative and hostile response. When the Machine Made Art examines the cultural and critical response to computer art, or what we refer to today as digital art. Tracing the heated debates between art and science, the societal anxiety over nascent computer technology, and the myths and philosophies surrounding digital computation, Taylor is able to identify the destabilizing forces that shape and eventually fragment the computer art movement.

Anti Oedipus

machine transmits value to the product, but only the value that the machine itself loses as it wears out. ... rather than allowing them slowly to wind down to a close or gradually die away into silence.32 The artist is the master of ...

Anti Oedipus

‘A major philosophical work by perhaps the most brilliant philosophical mind at work in France today.' Fredric Jameson Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995) was Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris VIII. He was a key figure in poststructuralism, and one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. Félix Guattari (1930-1992) was a psychoanalyst at the la Borde Clinic, as well as being a major social theorist and radical activist. Anti-Oedipus is part of Deleuze and Guattari's landmark philosophical project, Capitalism and Schizophrenia - a project that still sets the terms of contemporary philosophical debate. Anti-Oedipus is a radical philosophical analysis of desire that shows how we can combat the compulsion to dominate ourselves and others. As Michel Foucault says in his Preface it is an ‘Introduction to Non-Fascist Living'. Preface by Michel Foucault. Translated by Robert Hurley, Mark Seem, and Helen R. Lane

The Machine as Art The Machine as Artist

The articles collected in this volume from the two companion Arts Special Issues, "The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century)" and "The Machine as Artist (in the 21st Century)", represent a unique scholarly resource: analyses by artists, ...

The Machine as Art  The Machine as Artist

The articles collected in this volume from the two companion Arts Special Issues, "The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century)" and "The Machine as Artist (in the 21st Century)", represent a unique scholarly resource: analyses by artists, scientists, and engineers, as well as art historians, covering not only the current (and astounding) rapprochement between art and technology but also the vital post-World War II period that has led up to it; this collection is also distinguished by several of the contributors being prominent individuals within their own fields, or as artists who have actually participated in the still unfolding events with which it is concerned

Confronting the Machine

machine. Because the computer is a general-purpose symbolmanipulating machine, as the artist concedes, it is capable of “dealing with any problem which can be given a symbolic representation.”147 He starts with the hypothesis that ...

Confronting the Machine

Artists who work with new media generally adopt a critical media approach in contrast to artists who work with traditional art media. Where does the difference lie between media artists and artists who produce modern art? Which key art objects illustrate this trend? The author investigates the relationship between art and technology on the basis of work produced by Edward Ihnatowicz and Harald Cohen, and on the basis of the pioneering computer art exhibition at Dokumenta X in 1997. His line of argument counters the generally held view that computer art straddles the gap between art and technology. Instead, he is seeking a genuine interpretation of the origin of media art, and to develop new perspectives for it.

The Machines of Leonardo Da Vinci and Franz Reuleaux

In Italy, the artist-engineer Mariano Taccola [b. 1381] published ten books on machines in 1449, De Machinis Libri Decem, that contain many small painted illustrations of machines. These books pre-date the unpublished work of Leonardo ...

The Machines of Leonardo Da Vinci and Franz Reuleaux

This fascinating book will be of as much interest to engineers as to art historians, examining as it does the evolution of machine design methodology from the Renaissance to the Age of Machines in the 19th century. It provides detailed analysis, comparing design concepts of engineers of the 15th century Renaissance and the 19th century age of machines from a workshop tradition to the rational scientific discipline used today.

Machine in the Studio

Drawing on extensive interviews with artists and their assistants as well as close readings of artworks, Jones explains that much of the major work of the 1960s was compelling precisely because it was "mainstream" - central to the visual ...

Machine in the Studio

Drawing on extensive interviews with artists and their assistants as well as close readings of artworks, Jones explains that much of the major work of the 1960s was compelling precisely because it was "mainstream" - central to the visual and economic culture of its time.

Fernand L ger

Léger , " The Machine Aesthetic : Geometric Order and Truth , ” 1923 , in Functions of Painting , p . 64 . 4. Léger , “ The Machine Aesthetic : The Manufactured Object , the Artisan , and the Artist , ” 1923 , in Functions of Painting ...

Fernand L  ger

Fernand Leger (1881-1955) is the only modern artist to choose modernity itself as his subject. From his early series Contrastes de formes (1913-14), the first fully abstract works to emerge from Cubism, through his last realistic paintings of construction workers from the early 1950s, Leger's lifelong subject was the pulse and dynamism of contemporary life.

Machine Law Ethics and Morality in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

incomprehensible other whose presence evokes a sense of uncanny, and her gradual withdrawal from her performative work that includes machinic elements mark a transition in which artists began to give away a central stage to the machine, ...

Machine Law  Ethics  and Morality in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

Machines and computers are becoming increasingly sophisticated and self-sustaining. As we integrate such technologies into our daily lives, questions concerning moral integrity and best practices arise. A changing world requires renegotiating our current set of standards. Without best practices to guide interaction and use with these complex machines, interaction with them will turn disastrous. Machine Law, Ethics, and Morality in the Age of Artificial Intelligence is a collection of innovative research that presents holistic and transdisciplinary approaches to the field of machine ethics and morality and offers up-to-date and state-of-the-art perspectives on the advancement of definitions, terms, policies, philosophies, and relevant determinants related to human-machine ethics. The book encompasses theory and practice sections for each topical component of important areas of human-machine ethics both in existence today and prospective for the future. While highlighting a broad range of topics including facial recognition, health and medicine, and privacy and security, this book is ideally designed for ethicists, philosophers, scientists, lawyers, politicians, government lawmakers, researchers, academicians, and students. It is of special interest to decision- and policy-makers concerned with the identification and adoption of human-machine ethics initiatives, leading to needed policy adoption and reform for human-machine entities, their technologies, and their societal and legal obligations.

Machine Art in the Twentieth Century

Curator Pontus Hultén, for example, remembers artist Jean Tinguely's passion for hardware stores in Manhattan: At the time when Tinguely began to build machines of this kind [1960], he was living on Walker Street in New York, ...

Machine Art in the Twentieth Century

An investigation of artists' engagement with technical systems, tracing art historical lineages that connect works of different periods. “Machine art” is neither a movement nor a genre, but encompasses diverse ways in which artists engage with technical systems. In this book, Andreas Broeckmann examines a variety of twentieth- and early twenty-first-century artworks that articulate people's relationships with machines. In the course of his investigation, Broeckmann traces historical lineages that connect art of different periods, looking for continuities that link works from the end of the century to developments in the 1950s and 1960s and to works by avant-garde artists in the 1910s and 1920s. An art historical perspective, he argues, might change our views of recent works that seem to be driven by new media technologies but that in fact continue a century-old artistic exploration. Broeckmann investigates critical aspects of machine aesthetics that characterized machine art until the 1960s and then turns to specific domains of artistic engagement with technology: algorithms and machine autonomy, looking in particular at the work of the Canadian artist David Rokeby; vision and image, and the advent of technical imaging; and the human body, using the work of the Australian artist Stelarc as an entry point to art that couples the machine to the body, mechanically or cybernetically. Finally, Broeckmann argues that systems thinking and ecology have brought about a fundamental shift in the meaning of technology, which has brought with it a rethinking of human subjectivity. He examines a range of artworks, including those by the Japanese artist Seiko Mikami, whose work exemplifies the shift.

Urban Utopias in the Twentieth Century

13 relationship of the artist to the machine . “ My God is machinery , " he told the English handicraftsman Charles Ashbee in 1901. “ The art of the future will be the expression of the individual artist through the thousand powers of ...

Urban Utopias in the Twentieth Century

The utopian visions of three of urban planning’s greatest visionaries. Ebenezer Howard, Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier, hated the cities of their time with an overwhelming passion. The metropolis was the counter-image of their ideal cities, the hell that inspired their heavens. In this book Robert Fishman examines the utopian visions of three of urban planning’s greatest visionaries. Howard created the concept of the “garden city” where shops and cottages formed the center of a geometric pattern with farmland surrounding; Wright conceived of “Broadacre City,” the ultimate suburb, where the automobile was king; and Le Corbusier imagined “Ville Radieuse,” the city of cruciform skyscrapers set down in open parkland.

Hoover Dam

Strand's comment , in declaring that God was not humanistic but mechanistic , was the transcendent abdication of authority from man to machine . Other artists , like Strand , also felt the demission of human endeavor .

Hoover Dam

"Art historian Barbara Vilander's text places Glaha's efforts within the historical context of western landscape exploration and development and reveals how his particular qualifications led to his selection as the project photographer. Vilander then examines the many publications and venues in which the Bureau used Glaha's photographs to create support for the project. She also discusses how Glaha was recognized in his own era as an influential artist and teacher, and compares his work with that of other contemporary landscape photographers addressing western water management."--BOOK JACKET.

Information Technology and Systems

Artist identification has been an interesting task for centuries. Machine learning algorithms are used to solve this problem. An artist's profile is obtained through an artist's merged images enhanced with layer and transparency tools.

Information Technology and Systems

This book features a selection of articles from The 2019 International Conference on Information Technology & Systems (ICITS’19), held at the Universidad de Las Fuerzas Armadas, in Quito, Ecuador, on 6th to 8th February 2019. ICIST is a global forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss recent findings and innovations, current trends, professional experiences and challenges of modern information technology and systems research, together with their technological development and applications. The main topics covered are: information and knowledge management; organizational models and information systems; software and systems modeling; software systems, architectures, applications and tools; multimedia systems and applications; computer networks, mobility and pervasive systems; intelligent and decision support systems; big data analytics and applications; human–computer interaction; ethics, computers & security; health informatics; information technologies in education; cybersecurity and cyber-defense; electromagnetics, sensors and antennas for security.

Charles Sheeler and the Cult of the Machine

Machine - Age Interiors Sheeler's most profound and disturbing reflections on the machine age emerge in the artist's depictions of interiors . Works such as View of New York ( illus . 63 ) , Home Sweet Home ( illus .

Charles Sheeler and the Cult of the Machine

Charles Sheeler (1886-1965) was one of the most noted American painters and photographers to embrace the iconography of the machine. But was he high priest or heretic in the religion of mass production and technology that dominated his era? Karen Lucic considers this intriguing question while telling us Sheeler's story, and showing us how Sheeler produced images of extraordinary aesthetic power that provocatively confirmed America's technological and industrial prestige in vivid detail.