The Baseball Trust

These were the provisions critics had in mind when they alleged that baseball was an illegal trust. The National Agreement was no doubt a contract, but was it a contract in restraint of trade? Baseball's defenders argued that it was not ...

The Baseball Trust

The Baseball Trust is about the origins and persistence of baseball's strange exemption from antitrust law. Told through a frequently riveting and always entertaining history of America's pastime, author Stuart Banner emphasizes the strategies baseball has used to achieve a protected legal status enjoyed by no other industry in America.

James T Farrell and Baseball

Frank Smith, “Baseball $ as Harm to Game Awakens Nation,” Chicago Tribune, September 1, 1921, 18. 13. “Quest for Order,” box 44, Seymour Papers; “The Baseball Trust,” box 44, Seymour Papers. 14. “Fielder Jones on the Baseball Trust,” ...

James T  Farrell and Baseball

A social history of baseball on Chicago’s South Side in the early decades of the twentieth century, drawing on the writings of novelist James T. Farrell, along with historical sources related to baseball’s rich history in this era.

The Baseball Coaching Bible

We must remember that we are preparing ballplayers for successful everyday living , not merely the next level of baseball . Trust Perhaps the most cherished quality coaches can provide their players is trust in one another .

The Baseball Coaching Bible

Covers all aspects of coaching baseball including creating effective practive sessions, motivating players, and building a successful program.

A People s History of Baseball

Unless the trust had a significant impact on interstate commerce, it would be allowed to stand; a mere incidental ... Ma— jor League Baseball's trust (which resulted in this instance in the reserve clause that was at the center of the ...

A People s History of Baseball

From its first pitch, baseball has reflected national values and promoted the idea of what it means to be American. Beloved narratives tied the national pastime to beliefs as fundamental to our civic life as racial equality, patriotism, heroism, and virtuous capitalism. Mitchell Nathanson calls foul. Rejecting the myths and much-told tales, he examines how power is as much a part of baseball--and America--as pine tar and eye black. Indeed, the struggles for power within the game paralleled those that defined our nation. Nathanson follows the new Americans who sought club ownership to promote their social status in the increasingly closed caste system of nineteenth-century America. He shows how the rise and public rebuke of the Players Association reflects the collective spirit of working and middle-class America in the mid-twentieth century and the countervailing forces that sought to beat back the emerging movement. He lays bare the debilitating effects of a harsh double standard that required African American players to possess an unimpeachable character merely to take the field--a standard no white player had to meet. Told with passion and righteous outrage, A People's History of Baseball offers an incisive alternative history of America's much-loved--if misunderstood--national pastime.

Jews and Baseball

The Baseball Trust would simply emulate those run by the railroad, oil, banking, and steel magnates of the day. Freedman's critics called him a robber baron, but he kept reminding them that baseball was a profit-making business and ...

Jews and Baseball

Long before Hank Greenberg earned recognition as baseball’s greatest Jewish player, Jews had developed a unique, and very close, relationship with the American pastime. In the late nineteenth century, as both the American Jewish population and baseball’s popularity grew rapidly, baseball became an avenue by which Jewish immigrants could assimilate into American culture. Beyond the men (and, later, women) on the field, in the dugout, and at the front office, the Jewish community produced a huge base of fans and students of the game. This important book examines the interrelated histories of baseball and American Jews to 1948—the year Israel was established, the first full season that both major leagues were integrated, and the summer that Hank Greenberg retired. Covered are the many players, from Pike to Greenberg, as well as the managers, owners, executives, writers, statisticians, manufacturers and others who helped forge a bond between baseball and an emerging Jewish culture in America. Key reasons for baseball’s early appeal to Jews are examined, including cultural assimilation, rebellion against perceived Old World sensibilities, and intellectual and philosophical ties to existing Jewish traditions. The authors also clearly demonstrate how both Jews and baseball have benefited from their relationship.

Understanding Baseball

Within this political and legal setting, Federal Baseball fits in neatly. Major League Baseball's trust (which resulted in this instance in the reserve clause that was at the center of the dispute between the parties) clearly met ...

Understanding Baseball

The study of baseball history and culture shows the national pastime to be a forum of debate where issues of sport, labor, race, character and the ethics of work and play are decided. An understanding of baseball calls for consideration of different perspectives. This very readable textbook offers insights into baseball history as a subject worthy of scholarly attention. Each chapter introduces a specific disciplinary approach--history, economics, media, law and fiction--and poses representative questions scholars from these fields would consider.

The First World Series and the Baseball Fanatics Of 1903

In 1901 , at his estate in Red Bank , New Jersey , Freedman conspired with a clique of eastern National League owners to restructure the circuit as the National Baseball Trust . Ownership of the eight teams would be pooled with shares ...

The First World Series and the Baseball Fanatics Of 1903

A chronicle of the first World Series captures all the exitement and drama of this first match-up between the Boston Americans and the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Bat Ball Bible

Spalding's model for the baseball trust, so Brush asserted, was the Bicycle Trust. Such a trust involved management by a small board of control that would issue licenses to teams and leagues, allowing them to function.

Bat  Ball   Bible

During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, moral and social forces collided in the argument over upholding New York State's blue laws, meant to restrict social activities and maintain Sunday's traditional standing as a day of religious observation. Baseball was at the center of this conflict, which led to upheaval in society at a time when New York, especially New York City, was already undergoing rapid changes. From its inception, baseball, whether professional or amateur, was woven into the fabric of communities across the country and thus played an important social role. The baseball and the Sunday observance question involved the clash of religious organizations, civil and lobbying groups, and local and state politics. The debate intensified as other movements, such as temperance and the crusades against boxing and gambling, were beginning to gain momentum. Deep class, racial, religious, and ethnic divisions in New York's social order contributed to the issue as well. Bat, Ball & Bible does not solely chronicle baseball during this period; rather, it illuminates a culture war whose effects are still being felt today. Reflecting a number of contemporary religious and cultural issues, the book has appeal far beyond baseball.

The Battle that Forged Modern Baseball

It was only in the early 19005, as Progressives reacted against squalid working conditions and huge industrial concerns, that President Theodore Roosevelt began to enforce anti—trust legislation with vigor. Baseball was subject to the ...

The Battle that Forged Modern Baseball

In late 1913 the newly formed Federal League declared itself a major league in competition with the established National and American Leagues. Backed by some of America’s wealthiest merchants and industrialists, the new organization posed a real challenge to baseball’s prevailing structure. For the next two years the well-established leagues fought back furiously in the press, in the courts, and on the field. The story of this fascinating and complex historical battle centers on the machinations of both the owners and the players, as the Federals struggled for profits and status, and players organized baseball’s first real union. Award winning author, Daniel R. Levitt gives us the most authoritative account yet published of the short-lived Federal League, the last professional baseball league to challenge the National League and American League monopoly.

Baseball on Trial

28 Gates argued that organized baseball's hands were unclean because it had used the reserve clause to prevent new ... a] very serious proposition[:] . . . is the commission a trust within the meaning of the Sherman Anti-Trust act?

Baseball on Trial

The controversial 1922 Federal Baseball Supreme Court ruling held that the "business of base ball" was not subject to the Sherman Antitrust Act because it did not constitute interstate commerce. In Baseball on Trial, legal scholar Nathaniel Grow defies conventional wisdom to explain why the unanimous Supreme Court opinion authored by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, which gave rise to Major League Baseball's exemption from antitrust law, was correct given the circumstances of the time. Currently a billion dollar enterprise, professional baseball teams crisscross the country while the games are broadcast via radio, television, and internet coast to coast. The sheer scope of this activity would seem to embody the phrase "interstate commerce." Yet baseball is the only professional sport--indeed the sole industry--in the United States that currently benefits from a judicially constructed antitrust immunity. How could this be? Drawing upon recently released documents from the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Grow analyzes how the Supreme Court reached this seemingly peculiar result by tracing the Federal Baseball litigation from its roots in 1914 to its resolution in 1922, in the process uncovering significant new details about the proceedings. Grow observes that while interstate commerce was measured at the time by the exchange of tangible goods, baseball teams in the 1910s merely provided live entertainment to their fans, while radio was a fledgling technology that had little impact on the sport. The book ultimately concludes that, despite the frequent criticism of the opinion, the Supreme Court's decision was consistent with the conditions and legal climate of the early twentieth century.

Baseball

Members of the National Commission and some club owners immediately issued separate statements expressing a common theme: there was no baseball trust, and an investigation would be welcomed. Sporting News hinted that Gallagher had ...

Baseball

In Baseball: The Golden Age, Harold Seymour and Dorothy Seymour Mills explore the glorious era when the game truly captured the American imagination, with such legendary figures as Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb in the spotlight. Beginning with the formation of the two major leagues in 1903, when baseball officially entered its "golden age" of popularity, the authors examine the changes in the organization of professional baseball--from an unwieldy three-man commission to the strong one-man rule of Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis. They depicts how the play on the field shifted from the low-scoring, pitcher-dominated game of the "dead ball" era before World War I to the higher scoring of the 1920's "lively ball" era, with emphasis on home runs, best exemplified by the exploits of Babe Ruth. Note: On August 2, 2010, Oxford University Press made public that it would credit Dorothy Seymour Mills as co-author of the three baseball histories previously "authored" solely by her late husband, Harold Seymour. The Seymours collaborated on Baseball: The Early Years (1960), Baseball: The Golden Age (1971) and Baseball: The People's Game (1991).

An Insider s Guide to Baseball

American Baseball Coaches Association. Practice Perfect Baseball. Champaigne, IL: Human Kinetics, 2009. Banner, Stuart. The Baseball Trust: A History of Baseball's Antitrust Exemption. New York, NY: 2013. Hample, Zack.

An Insider s Guide to Baseball

Whether the reader is already a baseball expert or a newcomer to the sport, this colorful, engaging volume is a comprehensive guide for any kind of reader or baseball enthusiast. It includes tips on getting and staying in shape, which helps to promote a healthier lifestyle; historical facts and images from the past one hundred years; and photos of exciting game moments featuring popular players and coaches. Readers will be captivated by the history while learning facts and strategies for playing the modern game of baseball

Baseball in the Garden of Eden

At the end of 1901, A. G. Spalding Sr., who had reduced his baseball involvement, suddenly found himself embroiled in the fight against Freedmanism and Brushism and their proposed National League Baseball Trust.

Baseball in the Garden of Eden

Think you know how the game of baseball began? Think again. Forget Abner Doubleday and Cooperstown. Forget Alexander Joy Cartwright and the New York Knickerbockers. Instead, meet Daniel Lucius Adams, William Rufus Wheaton, and Louis Fenn Wadsworth, each of whom has a stronger claim to baseball paternity than Doubleday or Cartwright. But did baseball even have a father—or did it just evolve from other bat-and-ball games? John Thorn, baseball’s preeminent historian, examines the creation story of the game and finds it all to be a gigantic lie, not only the Doubleday legend, so long recognized with a wink and a nudge. From its earliest days baseball was a vehicle for gambling (much like cricket, a far more popular game in early America), a proxy form of class warfare, infused with racism as was the larger society, invigorated if ultimately corrupted by gamblers, hustlers, and shady entrepreneurs. Thorn traces the rise of the New York version of the game over other variations popular in Massachusetts and Philadelphia. He shows how the sport’s increasing popularity in the early decades of the nineteenth century mirrored the migration of young men from farms and small towns to cities, especially New York. And he charts the rise of secret professionalism and the origin of the notorious “reserve clause,” essential innovations for gamblers and capitalists. No matter how much you know about the history of baseball, you will find something new in every chapter. Thorn also introduces us to a host of early baseball stars who helped to drive the tremendous popularity and growth of the game in the post–Civil War era: Jim Creighton, perhaps the first true professional player; Candy Cummings, the pitcher who claimed to have invented the curveball; Albert Spalding, the ballplayer who would grow rich from the game and shape its creation myth; Hall of Fame brothers George and Harry Wright; Cap Anson, the first man to record three thousand hits and a virulent racist; and many others. Add bluff, bluster, and bravado, and toss in an illicit romance, an unknown son, a lost ball club, an epidemic scare, and you have a baseball detective story like none ever written. Thorn shows how a small religious cult became instrumental in the commission that was established to determine the origins of the game and why the selection of Abner Doubleday as baseball’s father was as strangely logical as it was patently absurd. Entertaining from the first page to the last, Baseball in the Garden of Eden is a tale of good and evil, and the snake proves the most interesting character. It is full of heroes, scoundrels, and dupes; it contains more scandal by far than the 1919 Black Sox World Series fix. More than a history of the game, Baseball in the Garden of Eden tells the story of nineteenth-century America, a land of opportunity and limitation, of glory and greed—all present in the wondrous alloy that is our nation and its pastime.

The Book of Baseball 1911

This new baseball trust—that is about What it amounted to—— was launched in Pittsburg with a flourish of trumpets. It was announced that at least fifty leading League players would break their contracts and join the venture, ...

The Book of Baseball  1911

One of the most sought-after documents of baseball's early days, this large-format hardcover features more than 220 game-action photos, publicity shots, and more. It explores the game's roots in the 1830s and the origins of the National and American leagues, and offers portraits of such stars as Ty Cobb, Cy Young, Joe Jackson, and others.

Baseball s Power Shift

... constituted a massive baseball trust, asked for a nine-count federal injunction against the National and American ... with the federal court and it was heard by Judge Kennesaw “Mountain” Landis, who was well known as a trustbuster.

Baseball s Power Shift

"Chronicles the media and public's prominent role in baseball's union movements between 1885 and 1981"--

Baseball

(Psalm 105:40) Trust is important in all phases of our life. In baseball, player trust the coaches have properly scouted the opposing team. Catchers trust their pitching coach and manager for guidance on signs. Pitchers trust the signs ...

Baseball

Scripture becomes evident in baseball, if we only look. As a special gift from God, many examples are herein detailed. If we can find God’s Word in baseball, we can find it elsewhere also.

100 Miles of Baseball

More like trust? Tonight, I see players with a whole array of trusts. They have trust in their ability to throw from third to first and they have trust in the first baseman's ability to catch it. This trust is rarely absent in MLB.

100 Miles of Baseball

From sandlots to major league stands, two fans set out to recapture their love of the game. For most of their lives together Dale Jacobs and Heidi LM Jacobs couldn’t imagine a spring without baseball. Their season tickets renewal package always seemed to arrive on the bleakest day of winter, offering reassurance that sunnier times were around the corner. Baseball was woven into the fabric of their lives, connecting them not only to each other but also to their families and histories. But by 2017 it was obvious something was amiss: the allure of another Sunday watching their Detroit Tigers had devolved to obligation. Not entirely sure what they were missing, they did have an idea on where it might be found: in their own backyard. Drawing a radius of one hundred miles around their home in Windsor, Ontario, Dale and Heidi set a goal of seeing fifty games at all levels of competition over the following summer. From bleachers behind high schools, to manicured university turf, to the steep concrete stands of major league parks, 100 Miles of Baseball tells the story of how two fans rediscovered their love of the game—and with it their relationships and the region they call home.

Baseball Is America

A Child of Baseball Jr. Baltov ... The baseball battlefield got off to a very ominous start. ... to supervise and direct traffic, part of the great American tradition of passing parents' "trust" to children through the game of baseball.

Baseball Is America

BASEBALL IS AMERICA explores America's Pastime through a trilogy of books: "A Child of Baseball" bats leadoff. Baseball, the bellybutton of society is a metaphor for America, acting both as its direction and reflection. Baseball is America, America is baseball. American history, embracing its religious past as a Christian nation, and baseball history, including its synthetic enhancement precedent, is traced through a tapestry of time in a life story format. Born into the Glory Days of New York baseball in 1955, baseball provides the author both identity and meaning. Narrative backdrops track both Reds and Yankee baseball, making historic stops over a 100+ year timeline. A 40+ year playing career is traced from 1962 Edison Little League through 2005 Roy Hobbs World Series in Edison's winter home (Fort Myers). Symbolism, baseball-speak, numerology, simile, nickname, euphemism and metaphor applications create a thought provoking and intriguing word sleuth effect exploring topics deep down in places we don't talk about at parties. Satire and cynical humor stragically integrated buffers acid discussion of controversial issues. Sixties youth ball is viewed and described through a Garden State lens. Seventies ball scenery drastically switches to the Sooner State while the 80's, 90's and new millenium take on a Lone Star State flavor with Space City the focal point. Pop culture, American history (including its Christian nation history) is tactically incorporated into the read. Baseball remains the only venue in America where religion can be pitched into public square casual conversation without being debased as a "nut-job" or being shown the door. The read displays no reservations of informally discussing topics from both Creator-based and man-based religious perspectives. The events surrounding the 1919 World Series, that the Reds accidentally won, are retold through the lens of a Cincinnati native who actually voted present, the author's grandpa.

Baseball Under the Lights

“Electric Lighting of a Baseball Field,” Electrical Review and Western Electrician, September 3, 1910, 473–474; ... Stuart Banner, The Baseball Trust: A History of Baseball's Antitrust Exemption (New York: Oxford University Press, ...

Baseball Under the Lights

Night games transformed the business of professional baseball, as the smaller, demographically narrower audiences able to attend daytime games gave way to larger, more diversified crowds of nighttime spectators. Many ball club owners were initially conflicted about artificial lighting and later actually resisted expanding the number of night games during the sport's struggle to balance ballpark attendance and television viewership in the 1950s. This first-ever comprehensive history of night baseball examines the factors, obstacles and trends that shaped this dramatic change in both the minor and major leagues between 1930 and 1990.

Baseball s Antitrust Exemption

STATEMENT OF FRANK C. SULLIVAN , CO - FOUNDER OF FANS FIRST DELIVERED TO THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY HEARINGS ON MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL'S ANTI - TRUST EXEMPTION SEPTEMBER 22 ...

Baseball s Antitrust Exemption