The Battle of Sekigahara

In his exploration of the battle, Chris Glenn reveals the developments that led up to the outbreak of war, the characters involved, how the battle itself unfolded, and the aftermath.

The Battle of Sekigahara

Sekigahara was the greatest samurai battle in history. Japan had long been at civil war until brought under the rule of Oda Nobunaga, and then, following his death at the hands of a traitorous general, that of Toyotomi Hideyoshi. It was Hideyoshi who completed the unification of Japan and ushered in a period of peace. After Hideyoshi’s death in 1598, a power struggle emerged between those loyal to the Toyotomi, and those who supported the second most powerful warlord, Tokugawa Ieyasu. With Hideyoshi gone, Ieyasu made moves that brought the ire of a number of his contemporaries, and soon the entire country was divided into two great armies, East and West. Leading the loyalist cause was Ishida Mitsunari, who gathered a force of around 130,000 samurai, while the Tokugawa commanded just 80,000. Both sides hurried to seize strategically vital highways and castles. These attacks and sieges culminated in the decisive Battle of Sekigahara. Fought on 21 October 1600, the battle lasted just six hours, but saw the deaths of an estimated 30,000 samurai, the destruction of a number of noble families and the creation of the Tokugawa Shogunate that was to rule Japan for 260 years of relative peace. The loyalist forces, despite their superior numbers and excellent battle formations, were defeated. In his exploration of the battle, Chris Glenn reveals the developments that led up to the outbreak of war, the characters involved, how the battle itself unfolded, and the aftermath. The weapons and armor of the time are also fully explained, along with little known customs of the samurai and their warfare.

The Battle of Sekigahara

The Battle of Sekigahara: The History and Legacy of the Battle that Unified Japan under the Tokugawa Shogunate chronicles the events that led to one of the most important conflicts in Japanese history.

The Battle of Sekigahara

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading On October 21, 1600, two massive Japanese armies, totaling an estimated 200,000 soldiers armed to the teeth with swords, yari (spears), arrows, muskets and cannons, faced off on a battlefield near the town of Sekigahara. A bitter fight to the death ensued, and the results would determine the course of Japanese history for the next 250 years. On the battlefield was the warlord Ieyasu Tokugawa, a man desiring domain over the entire island of Japan, but standing in his way was Ishida Mitsunari, a warlord controlling vast swaths of western Japan. Moving with his armies from the east, Ieyasu maneuvered into a position at Sekigahara. Ieyasu was relying heavily on the legendary Japanese samurai, but contrary to popular belief, the samurai warriors of that era were avid firearm users, and this battle would be no exception, as both armies bristled with muskets and cannons. Ieyasu was outnumbered, but he had a trump card: traitors placed in the enemy army. These treacherous warlords would join Ieyasu in the midst of the battle, turning it in his favor. When Ieyasu became shogun (military dictator) of Japan, he presided over the beginning of the Tokugawa shogunate, which brought peace and stability to all of Japan if only by ending the constant civil wars. Many changes took place, most notably in the capabilities of the samurai, Japan's ruling military class, who were no longer active combat participants. Instead, most of these warriors were fighters in name only, ruling, instead, as privileged bureaucrats. They served the Tokugawa Shogunate, a military government that moved to isolate Japan from the rest of the world, for more than two centuries, and military service became the exclusive domain of a privileged warrior class that combined the military with an intricate network of social status and vassalage to feudal lords. As a feudal government, the Tokugawa shogunate split control of state domains under feudal lords known as daimyō. Although given a high degree of autonomy, the daimyō were responsible to the shogun to provide "maintenance of armed forces, the protection of the coastline, and attendance on the shogun at appointed times." The maintenance of these functions required a large amount of support from society in general, including merchants, peasants, and artisans, but this system of military governance ensured that the warriors' social status was elevated to a position of high prestige. Thus, samurai held a virtual monopoly not only on military positions, but also administrative positions at both the central and regional levels, and as a symbol of their status, samurais were the only class allowed to carry weapons - a longsword and shortsword - in public. The blissful isolation changed with the arrival of American Commodore Matthew Perry in 1853. In awe of the American weapons and ships, the Tokugawa shogunate quickly realized that they needed to evolve and modernize their military to survive, and a time of rapid change descended on Japan. As it turned out, however, the shogunate would not have a chance to modernize the nation, because the Meiji Restoration supplanted the shogunate with a new dynasty, and within a mere 30 years, the Tokugawa shogunate and its samurai caste would be relics of the past. The Battle of Sekigahara: The History and Legacy of the Battle that Unified Japan under the Tokugawa Shogunate chronicles the events that led to one of the most important conflicts in Japanese history. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Battle of Sekigahara like never before.

Sekigahara 1600

Armies of the two sides met on the plain of Sekigahara on 21 October 1600, in thick fog and deep mud. By the end of the day 40,000 heads had been taken and Ieyasu was master of Japan.

Sekigahara 1600

Sekigahara was the most decisive battle in Japanese history. Fought against the ritualised and colourful backdrop of Samurai life, it was the culmination of a long-standing power struggle between Tokugawa Ieyasu and Hashiba Hideyoshi, two of the most powerful men in Japan. Armies of the two sides met on the plain of Sekigahara on 21 October 1600, in thick fog and deep mud. By the end of the day 40,000 heads had been taken and Ieyasu was master of Japan. Within three years the Emperor would grant him the title he sought – Shogun. This title describes the campaign leading up to this great battle and examines Sekigahara, including the forces and personalities of the two major sides and that of the turncoat Kobayakawa Hideaki.

The Battle of Sekigahara

The Battle of Gettysburg (1–3 July 1863)..........7,863 killed The Battle of Agincourt (25 October 1415).......10,000 killed The Battle of Sekigahara (21 October 1600)......30,000 killed The Battle of Waterloo (18 June ...

The Battle of Sekigahara

Sekigahara was the greatest samurai battle in history. Japan had long been at civil war until brought under the rule of Oda Nobunaga, and then, following his death at the hands of a traitorous general, that of Toyotomi Hideyoshi. It was Hideyoshi who completed the unification of Japan and ushered in a period of peace. After Hideyoshi’s death in 1598, a power struggle emerged between those loyal to the Toyotomi, and those who supported the second most powerful warlord, Tokugawa Ieyasu. With Hideyoshi gone, Ieyasu made moves that brought the ire of a number of his contemporaries, and soon the entire country was divided into two great armies, East and West. Leading the loyalist cause was Ishida Mitsunari, who gathered a force of around 130,000 samurai, while the Tokugawa commanded just 80,000. Both sides hurried to seize strategically vital highways and castles. These attacks and sieges culminated in the decisive Battle of Sekigahara. Fought on 21 October 1600, the battle lasted just six hours, but saw the deaths of an estimated 30,000 samurai, the destruction of a number of noble families and the creation of the Tokugawa Shogunate that was to rule Japan for 260 years of relative peace. The loyalist forces, despite their superior numbers and excellent battle formations, were defeated. In his exploration of the battle, Chris Glenn reveals the developments that led up to the outbreak of war, the characters involved, how the battle itself unfolded, and the aftermath. The weapons and armor of the time are also fully explained, along with little known customs of the samurai and their warfare.

The Battle of Sekigahara

The decisive Battle of Sekigahara was the greatest samurai battle in Japan's history.

The Battle of Sekigahara

The decisive Battle of Sekigahara was the greatest samurai battle in Japan's history. It lasted just seven hours but saw the deaths of over 30,000 samurai. The loyalist forces, despite superior numbers and excellent battle formations, were defeated. Discover the developments leading to the outbreak of war, the characters involved, the battle, and the aftermath. Samurai weapons and armor are also fully explained, along with little known customs of the samurai and their warfare. FEATURES MORE THAN 80 COLOR PHOTOS AND ILLUSTRATIONS.

Sekigahara and Shiroyama

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography On October 21, 1600, two massive Japanese armies, totaling an estimated 200,000 soldiers armed to the teeth with swords, yari (spears), arrows, muskets and cannons, faced off on a battlefield near ...

Sekigahara and Shiroyama

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography On October 21, 1600, two massive Japanese armies, totaling an estimated 200,000 soldiers armed to the teeth with swords, yari (spears), arrows, muskets and cannons, faced off on a battlefield near the town of Sekigahara. A bitter fight to the death ensued, and the results would determine the course of Japanese history for the next 250 years. On the battlefield was the warlord Ieyasu Tokugawa, a man desiring domain over the entire island of Japan, but standing in his way was Ishida Mitsunari, a warlord controlling vast swaths of western Japan. Moving with his armies from the east, Ieyasu maneuvered into a position at Sekigahara. Ieyasu was relying heavily on the legendary Japanese samurai, but contrary to popular belief, the samurai warriors of that era were avid firearm users, and this battle would be no exception, as both armies bristled with muskets and cannons. Ieyasu was outnumbered, but he had a trump card: traitors placed in the enemy army. These treacherous warlords would join Ieyasu in the midst of the battle, turning it in his favor. When Ieyasu became shogun (military dictator) of Japan, he presided over the beginning of the Tokugawa shogunate, which brought peace and stability to all of Japan if only by ending the constant civil wars. Many changes took place, most notably in the capabilities of the samurai, Japan's ruling military class, who were no longer active combat participants. Instead, most of these warriors were fighters in name only, ruling, instead, as privileged bureaucrats. They served the Tokugawa Shogunate, a military government that moved to isolate Japan from the rest of the world, for more than two centuries, and military service became the exclusive domain of a privileged warrior class that combined the military with an intricate network of social status and vassalage to feudal lords. On September 25, 1877, on a rain-soaked, muddy field in Kagoshima, Japan, a small group of proud samurai warrior rebels prepared for one last stand. It was early morning, 6:00 a.m., and the remaining 40 samurai warriors still capable of fighting prepared themselves for the glory of death on the battlefield. They had been shelled by powerful artillery guns and naval cannons relentlessly through the night, and the rebels had no real shelter or protection. Instead, they cowered like rats in small, rain-filled mud holes, showered by a torrent of steel shells and shrapnel. For seven months, the samurai rebels had fought a losing battle against the army of Emperor Meiji, the new ruler of Japan's central government. It was a modern army, filled with conscripts, armed with rifles, and trained in European tactics. The samurai rebels were also armed with rifles, but months of fighting had stripped them of ammunition. They still possessed their distinctive personal weapons - their katana swords - and they intended to use them one last time. Despite the overwhelming firepower and numbers advantage wielded by the central government, the rebels, led by Saigō Takamori, a samurai warrior and proud defender of the samurai tradition, remained stoic in their final moments. By early morning, the last capable samurai drew their swords and launched a final suicidal charge into the rapidly firing rifles of 30,000 conscript troops, members of Japan's modern imperial army. It would be the samurai's last stand. Lionized in the Tom Cruise film The Last Samurai, the Battle of Shiroyama was the dying gasp of feudal Japan. For centuries, the Japanese warrior caste, known as the samurai, had held positions of high prestige and privilege in Japan. Paid a stipend and holding both military and civil positions, the samurai were a proud group that looked down upon Japan's commoners and merchants. They served the Tokugawa shogunate, a military dictatorship that ascended to power and isolated Japan from the rest of the world, for more than two centuries.

In the Name of the Battle against Piracy

In September 1600, not long after the return of the Murakamis to the Seto Inland Sea, the Battle of Sekigahara was fought between those daimyos under the leadership of Ishida Mitsunari who attempted to uphold the Toyotomi regime, ...

In the Name of the Battle against Piracy

In the Name of the Battle against Piracy discusses the antipiracy campaigns in Europe and Asia in the 16th-19th centuries, exploring how the state used them to establish its authority, and how state and non-state actors joined them for personal benefit.

Sekigahara 1600

Armies of the two sides met on the plain of Sekigahara on 21 October 1600, in thick fog and deep mud. By the end of the day 40,000 heads had been taken and Ieyasu was master of Japan.

Sekigahara 1600

Sekigahara was the most decisive battle in Japanese history. Fought against the ritualised and colourful backdrop of Samurai life, it was the culmination of a long-standing power struggle between Tokugawa Ieyasu and Hashiba Hideyoshi, two of the most powerful men in Japan. Armies of the two sides met on the plain of Sekigahara on 21 October 1600, in thick fog and deep mud. By the end of the day 40,000 heads had been taken and Ieyasu was master of Japan. Within three years the Emperor would grant him the title he sought - Shogun. Byrant describes the campaign leading up to this great battle and examines Sekigahara, including the forces and personalities of the two major sides and that of the turncoat Kobayakawa Hideaki. Sekigahara was the most decisive battle in Japanese history. Fought against the ritualised and colourful backdrop of Samurai life, it was the culmination of a long-standing power struggle between Tokugawa Ieyasu and Hashiba Hideyoshi, two of the most powerful men in Japan. Both men had fought and intrigued to gain control of the country in the 1570s-80s, Ieyasu eventually submitting to Hideyoshi in 1584. On Hideyoshi's death in 1598 a council of regents was formed to govern and serve as guardians for his underage son. Ieyasu was a member and saw his chance to realise his dream of complete power. His greatest rival on the council was Hideyoshi's old companion Ishida Mitsunari. They met on the plain of Sekigahara on 21 October 1600, in thick fog and deep mud. Almost from the start the battle involved mostly hand-to-hand combat with mass desertions from Mitsunari's side to Ieyasu's. By the end of the day 40,000 heads had been taken and Ieyasu was master of Japan. Within three years the Emperor would grant him the title he sought - Shogun. Anthony Bryant recounts the campaign leading up to this great battle and examines Sekigahara, including the forces and personalities of the two major sides and that of the turncoat Kobayakawa Hideaki.

THE NINJA BOOK The New Mansenshukai

The Ninja Book compiles some of the latest research to share new facts on ninja culture and notorious historic figures.

THE NINJA BOOK  The New Mansenshukai

Popular interest in ninja has driven local Japanese researchers to unearth more history than ever before on these mysterious men of magic and might. The Ninja Book compiles some of the latest research to share new facts on ninja culture and notorious historic figures. Ninja fans around the world will take great pleasure in this broader exploration of the origins of ninja in Japan. [Contents] 1. A Ninja's Work 2. The History of Ninja 1) History of Iga Ninja 2) History of Koka Ninja 3) Battle of Magari 4) Sengoku (Warring States) Period 5) Iga Sokoku Ikki 6) Tensho Iga Wars 7) Tokugawa Ieyasu's Passage through Iga 8) Before and After the Battle of Sekigahara 9) Tokugawa(Edo) Period 10) Chronology of Ninja History 3. Ninjutsu and Ningu 1) What is Ninjutsu? 2) Ninjutsu Documents 3) Yonin and Innin 4) The Six Tools of the Ninja 5) Shichihode (Seven Disguises of the Ninja) 6) Ninja Foods 7) Ninja Medicine 8) Koka Medicine and Yamabushi 4. Essays on Ninja (special supplement) 1)Shugen and Ninja 2)Naruto and One Piece Feature (1) Attacks on Oda Nobunaga Feature (2) Koka-ryu Ninjutsu House Feature (3) Was Matsuo Basho a Ninja? Feature (4) Tateoka no Dojun and his mastery of Bakemono-jutsu (ghost technique) Feature (5) Was Kan'ami a Ninja? [Supervisor] Yuji Yamada PhD Professor of history of ancient and medieval Japanese belief systems, Faculty of Humanities, Law and Economics, Mie University. His main publications include Sutokuin onryo no kenkyu (A study of the vengeful spirit of Sutokuin), Shibunkaku Shuppan, 2001; Bakkosuru onryo - tatari to chinkon no Nihonshi (Free-acting vengeful spirits: A Japanese history of curses and spiritual appeasement), Yoshikawa Kobunkan, 2007; Nihon shisoshi koza I kodai (Lectures on Japanese history of thought: ancient times, Volume 1), Perikansha, 2012, co-author.

Samurai Armies 1550 1615

In 1543 three Portuguese merchants entered a turbulent Japan, bringing with them the first firearms the Japanese had ever seen: simple matchlock muskets called arquebuses.

Samurai Armies 1550   1615

In 1543 three Portuguese merchants entered a turbulent Japan, bringing with them the first firearms the Japanese had ever seen: simple matchlock muskets called arquebuses. They proved a decisive addition to the Japanese armoury, as for centuries the samurai had fought only with bow, sword and spear. In 1575, one of the greatest original thinkers in the history of samurai, Oda Nobunaga, arranged his arquebusiers in ranks three deep behind a palisade and proceeded, quite literally, to blow his opponent's cavalry to pieces, marking the beginning of a new era in Japanese military history.

Famous Battles of the Early Modern Period

Sekigahara 1600 KEY FACTS WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN WHY OUTCOME The clans of Tokugawa Ieyasu's Eastern Army against those of the Western Army of Ishida Mitsunari. The Western Army entered the battle with a well thought-out tactical plan.

Famous Battles of the Early Modern Period

In Europe, the early modern period lasted roughly from the fifteenth century to the eighteenth century. During this time, European nations expanded around the world and clashed in the process. This book demonstrates how successful military campaigns determined the European nations that would become superpowers. The book includes timelines, maps, and full-color photographs to create a vivid portrait of some of history's most decisive battles.

Samurai War Stories

Narratives of actual battles and sieges are included in the texts, such as the famous Battle of Sekigahara. This collection is an invaluable resource that sheds new light on the world of the legendary Japanese warrior.

Samurai War Stories

Enter the world of seventeenth-century Japanese warfare and the warrior elite, the Samurai. Samurai War Stories: Teachings and Tales of Samurai Warfare is a collection of three major texts, published in an English translation for the first time. These works include writings on three distinct military strata: the Samurai; the Ashigaru or foot soldier; and women in war. Including guidelines, tactics, commentaries and advice written by Samurai of the period, as well as intricate illustrations. Narratives of actual battles and sieges are included in the texts, such as the famous Battle of Sekigahara. This collection is an invaluable resource that sheds new light on the world of the legendary Japanese warrior.

Historical Dictionary of Japan to 1945

BATTLE OF SEKIGAHARA (SEKIGAHARA NO TATAKAI,関ヶ原の戦い, 1600). On his deathbed in 1598, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the de facto ruler of Japan, implored his senior advisers (known as the Five Great Elders) to look after his infant heir ...

Historical Dictionary of Japan to 1945

The Historical Dictionary of Japan to 1945 spans the entire period from the earliest evidence of human habitation in Japan through to the end of the Pacific War. It includes substantial topics such as cultural and literary history, with entries ranging from aesthetics to various genres of writing. Other branches of history also feature, such as economic history, industrial history, political history, and so forth. And of course there are the makers of Japanese history, ranging from emperors and shoguns to politicians and extremists – as well as foreign arrivals. The early history of Japan is told through a detailed chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, an extensive bibliography, and over 800 cross-referenced dictionary entries on important people, organizations, activities, and events. The Historical Dictionary of Japan to 1945 will appeal to both academics and the general public who have an interest in Japan, particularly those who want reliable information quickly and easily.

War In The Early Modern World 1450 1815

It is estimated, in fact, that only about 30,000 troops of the western army—slightly more than one-third of its total of 82,000—actually participated in the battle of Sekigahara. Even so, the outcome of the fighting was still in doubt ...

War In The Early Modern World  1450 1815

This book presents a collection of essays charting the developments in military practice and warfare across the world in the early modern period. It also considers the nature and role of technological change, and the relationship between military developments and state-building.

War in Japan

The floor on Sekigahara, looking which they had committed seppuku was now soaked in their blood with red handprints that spoke of the tragedy. After the battle of Sekigahara, the floor was carefully removed and towards the hill of ...

War in Japan

Fully illustrated with colour maps and 50 images, this is an accessible introduction to the most violent, turbulent, cruel and exciting chapter in Japanese history. In 1467 the Onin War ushered in a period of unparalleled conflict and rivalry in Japan that came to be called the Age of Warring States. In this book, Stephen Turnbull offers a masterly exposition of the wars, explaining what led to Japan's disintegration into rival domains after more than a century of relative peace; the years of fighting that followed; and the period of gradual fusion when the daimyo (great names) strove to reunite Japan under a new Shogun. Peace returned to Japan with the end of the Osaka War in 1615. Turnbull draws on his latest research to include new material for this updated edition, covering samurai acting as mercenaries, the expeditions to Korea, Taiwan and Okinawa, and the little-known campaigns against the Ainu of Hokkaido, to present a richer picture of an age when conflicts were spread far more widely than was hitherto realised. With specially commissioned maps and all-new images throughout, this updated and revised edition provides a concise overview of Japan's turbulent Age of Warring States.

Japan at War

Himeji Castle passed into the control of Tokugawa Ieyasu after the Battle of Sekigahara in I600. (Corel). not well received by an increasingly more militaristic government. The journal published discussions about controversial topics ...

Japan at War

This compelling reference focuses on the events, individuals, organizations, and ideas that shaped Japanese warfare from early times to the present day. * Topic finder lists * A comprehensive timeline * 10 maps of key military theaters * Essential primary source documents related to the military history of Japan

War as Entertainment and Contents Tourism in Japan

Mitsunari was the closest subordinate of Toyotomi Hideyoshi and was executed because he lost the Battle of Sekigahara against Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1600. The Tokugawa shogunate treated him as the rebel leader and destroyed Mitsunari's ...

War as Entertainment and Contents Tourism in Japan

This book examines the phenomenon of war-related contents tourism throughout Japanese history, from conflicts described in ancient Japanese myth through to contemporary depictions of fantasy and futuristic warfare. It tackles two crucial questions: first, how does war transition from being traumatic to entertaining in the public imagination and works of popular culture; and second, how does visitation to war-related sites transition from being an act of mourning or commemorative pilgrimage into an act of devotion or fan pilgrimage? Representing the collaboration of ten expert researchers of Japanese popular culture and travel, it develops a theoretical framework for understanding war-related contents tourism and demonstrates the framework in practice via numerous short case studies across a millennium of warfare in Japan including: the tales of heroic deities in the Kojiki (Records of Ancient Matters, AD 712), the Edo poetry of Matsuo Basho, and the Pacific war through lens of popular media such as the animated film the Grave of the Fireflies. This book will be of interest to researchers and students in tourism studies and cultural studies, as well as more general issues of war and peace in Japan, East Asia and beyond.

Battles That Changed History

The Battle of Sekigahara was the turning point in the Japanese Unification Wars (1550–1615). During the Heianera (794–1192) the emperor ruled Japan from the city of Kyoto. In the 12th century, however, imperial rule was threatened by a ...

Battles That Changed History

Presents over two hundred battles that changed the course of history, including the date, place, participants, and the historical significance of each conflict.