The Bibliophile s Devotional

Nevertheless, many of us are unabashed bibliophiles who, if we could, would line our walls with books and read as many as our busy lives permit. We savor the heft of a book in our hands. Thrill at reading a book's opening paragraphs and ...

The Bibliophile s Devotional

What better way to start a day than with inspiration from a literary classic? Now you can do just that. In this book, praised author and critic Hallie Ephron delivers a daily dose of literary knowledge. A brilliant companion to the canon of great literature, it's perfect for anyone who wants a novel way to energize each day. Ephron's work is a secular twist on the traditional devotional and provides concise plot summaries, sketches of standout characters, quotations you should know, and more about hundreds of books by tried-and-true authors as well as new literary voices. Whether it's coffee with Austen, a quick lunch with Faulkner, or an end-of-the-day jolt with Chabon, this book proves a good book is a great source of daily inspiration.

The Old Book Peddler and other tales for bibliophiles

That a devotion to the purely spiritual, that a complete immersion in a single idea could still happen today, a withdrawal not less complete than that of an Indian Yogi or of a medieval monk in his cell, and that this could happen in an ...

The Old Book Peddler and other tales for bibliophiles

"The Old Book Peddler and other tales for bibliophiles" by Stefan Zweig. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Addiction and Devotion in Early Modern England

“Doctor Faustus: Death of a Bibliophile.” Connotations 1 no. ... Faithfully translated out of Latine into English, by E. P. Whereunto is also added a commentarie upon the Evangelist S. Iohn, by the same author. London, 1584. ———.

Addiction and Devotion in Early Modern England

Rebecca Lemon illuminates a previously-buried conception of addiction, as a form of devotion at once laudable, difficult, and extraordinary, that has been concealed by the persistent modern link of addiction to pathology. Surveying sixteenth-century invocations, she reveals how early moderns might consider themselves addicted to study, friendship, love, or God. However, she also uncovers their understanding of addiction as a form of compulsion that resonates with modern scientific definitions. Specifically, early modern medical tracts, legal rulings, and religious polemic stressed the dangers of addiction to alcohol in terms of disease, compulsion, and enslavement. Yet the relationship between these two understandings of addiction was not simply oppositional, for what unites these discourses is a shared emphasis on addiction as the overthrow of the will. Etymologically, "addiction" is a verbal contract or a pledge, and even as sixteenth-century audiences actively embraced addiction to God and love, writers warned against commitment to improper forms of addiction, and the term became increasingly associated with disease and tyranny. Examining canonical texts including Doctor Faustus, Twelfth Night, Henry IV, and Othello alongside theological, medical, imaginative, and legal writings, Lemon traces the variety of early modern addictive attachments. Although contemporary notions of addiction seem to bear little resemblance to its initial meanings, Lemon argues that the early modern period's understanding of addiction is relevant to our modern conceptions of, and debates about, the phenomenon.

Bibliophiles and Bibliothieves

His hauntingly beautiful miniatures adorned books used in devotional readings. Chapter 6: “Enjoy the War, the Peace Is Going to. * “Besitzgeschichte der Handschrift 4° Ms.math.50 Gebetbuch Herzogs Johann Albrecht von Mecklenburg” ...

Bibliophiles and Bibliothieves

In Bibliophiles and Bibliothieves, Opritsa Popa has documented what might justifiably be described as the most celebrated case of looting of two German cultural treasures by a member of the U.S. Army at the end of World War II and their subsequent odyssey across both an ocean and a continent: the pilfering from a cellar in Bad Wildungen of the ninth-century Liber Sapientiae, containing the two leaves of the oldest extant German heroic poem, the Old High German Hildebrandslied, along with the fourteenth-century illuminated Willehalm codex, both of which had been removed from the State Library in Kassel for protection from bombing raids.

Images of Cult and Devotion

30V – Myra D. Orth , ' Antwerp Mannerist model drawings in French Renaissance Books of Hours : A case study of the 1520s Hours workshop ' , The Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , 47 , 1989 , 7790 , siehe S. 82-83 , Fig .

Images of Cult and Devotion

Medieval pilgrims not only worshipped relics, they also venerated statues and paintings. These images or idols' were of particular importance in the day-to-day religion of ordinary people judged superstitious by the Church.

Walker s Rhyming Dictionary of the English Language

Medie'vallom s . Devotion to the Institutions , etc. , Is'lamism s . The Mohamıncdan religion . of the Middle Ages ; medlæval Dy'namism s . Theory explaining phenomcoa as belief or practice . the ultimate result of immancat Loy'alism s ...

Walker s Rhyming Dictionary of the English Language

This is a long-established standard work of reference for poets and rhymesters.

Devotion

The randiness is getting out of hand in several quarters , and unless he wants his little chateau written up as a brothel , he'd better go about separating the beasts . ” “ You should really go watch , ” Whitney said with a grin .

Devotion

Catherine and Jeremy thought their love would last forever. Then Catherine fell ill and died. Only after Jeremy meets strong, beautiful Anna can he forget Catherine. But Catherine still controls Jeremy, drawing him into a cold, pulsing evil, into a dark, undying love.

The Adventures of Gillion de Trazegnies

Van Lathem is somewhat unusual among Flemish artists of the second half of the fifteenth century in that his body of works is divided between devotional and secular manuscripts. Many illuminators of the day seemed to specialize in ...

The Adventures of Gillion de Trazegnies

One of the finest works from the golden era of Flemish manuscript illumination, the Getty’s copy of the Romance of Gillion de Trazegnies tells of the adventures of a medieval nobleman. Part travelogue, part romance, and part epic, the text traces the exciting exploits of Gillion as he journeys to Jerusalem on pilgrimage, is imprisoned in Egypt and rises to the command of the Sultan’s armies, mistakenly becomes a bigamist first with a Christian and then a Muslim wife, and dies in battle as a glorious hero. The tale encompasses the most thrilling elements of the Western romance genre — love, villainy, loyalty, and war — set against the backdrop of the East. This lavishly illustrated volume reveals for the first time the complexity of this illuminated romance. A complete reproduction of the book’s illustrations and a partial translation of the text appear along with essays that explore the manuscript’s vibrant cultural, historical, and artistic contexts. The innovative illuminations, by the renowned artist Lieven van Lathem, juxtapose the reality of medieval Europe with an idealized vision of the East. This unusual pairing, found in the text and illustrations, is the source of a rich discussion of the fifteenth-century political situation in the West and the Crusades in the East.

Margaret of York Simon Marmion and The Visions of Tondal

Our emerging understanding of late medieval women both as bibliophiles and as practitioners of lay piety suggests that spiritual values and devotional practice were expected to play a strong and distinctive role in the lives of ...

Margaret of York  Simon Marmion  and The Visions of Tondal

Presented at a symposium held in 1990 to celebrate the Getty Museum's acquisition of the only known illuminated copy of The Visions of Tondal, twenty essays address the celebrated bibliophilic activity of Margaret of York; the career of Simon Marmion, a favorite artist of the Burgundian court; and The Visions of Tondal in relation to illustrated visions of the Middle Ages. Contributors include Maryan Ainsworth, Wim Blockmans, Walter Cahn, Albert Derolez, Peter Dinzelbacher, Rainald Grosshans, Sandra Hindman, Martin Lowry, Nigel Morgan, and Nigel Palmer.

The Illustrated Catholic Family Annual for

DUS A LOVE of books is a commendable devotion . Of all manias that of the bibliomaniac is perhaps the least reprehensible . To the zeal , sometimes mounting to a species of frenzy , of the literary antiquary are we indebted for the ...

The Illustrated Catholic Family Annual for


The Virgin Mary in the Perceptions of Women

The setting is a reference to one of the Virgin's titles derived from the Biblical Song of Solomon, ... Like many wealthy bibliophiles of that era, they ordered large devotional volumes to keep in their libraries, small, more portable ...

The Virgin Mary in the Perceptions of Women

Once, the Virgin Mary was a pivotal element of Christianity, a holy figure at the heart of most Christians’ spiritual lives. She was invoked at all major life passages—baptisms, weddings, childbirths, and funerals—and images of the Virgin Mary could be found virtually anywhere, from pub signs to sacred texts. Medieval women especially looked to Mary to answer their prayers, be their role model, and serve as their advocate in heaven. They prayed to her several times a day and sometimes devoted their entire lives to her service. This book investigates perceptions of the Virgin Mary through several centuries of literature. Focusing especially on the depictions of the Virgin Mary in medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, the author rediscovers a time when the Divine Female was very much in evidence, and good Christian women were taught to pray to a Holy Mother. Topics include the cyclical popularity of Virgin Mary; devotional objects such as Books of Hours, rosaries, and Marian gardens; the mystical qualities attributed to the Virgin Mary through centuries of reported divine visions; the historical relationships between the Virgin Mary and other religious figures, including the Devil; and Mary Magdalene as an alternative to the Virgin Mary as a feminine model.

Nicholas Love s Mirror and Late Medieval Devotio Literary Culture

This devotion to the Eucharist is in fact mirrored in the York Cycle, itself ... Firstly, the existence of a class of bibliophiles made up of aristocrats and cultural elites, who held an interest in devotio-literary culture and who ...

Nicholas Love s Mirror and Late Medieval Devotio Literary Culture

Surviving in 59 complete manuscript versions, few English texts of the late medieval period seem to have achieved the popularity of Nicholas Love's fifteenth-century translation and adaptation of the Latin Meditationes Vitae Christi - The Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ. The Mirror has received surprisingly little scholarly attention and is often contextualized in terms of its role in the theological conflict between English ecclesiastical orthodoxy and the teachings of heresiarch John Wycliff. David Falls presents a new account of the text's history which de-centralises, but does not disregard, the influence of the Wycliffite controversy. Falls interrogates preconceptions and investigates new possibilities for understanding the composition, circulation, function and use of Love's Mirror by examining both the textual modifications and additions made by Love in his adaptation of the Latin, and places these alterations in context by examining individual copies of the Mirror. The manuscript copies are read as both sites of literary consumption and nexuses of textual transition, demonstrating that it was Love's ability to inscribe his work with "functional diversity" which explains the Mirror's popularity. This book presents a nuanced picture not only of the Mirror's production, circulation and function, but also the dynamic and flourishing devotio-literary culture of late medieval England in which Love's text operated.

Reputation and Representation in Fifteenth Century Europe

In an age when most aristocratic education took place at home rather than in a formal school setting and documentation is scarce, we can only speculate on the processes by which upper-class women were educated. However, the patronage of ...

Reputation and Representation in Fifteenth Century Europe

This volume deals with political, military, social, architectural, and literary aspects of fifteenth-century England. The essays contained in the volume range across the century from some of the leading scholars currently working in the period.

Illuminating the Renaissance

In this volume the term Flanders is used in the broadest sense, to refer to the larger Burgundian holdings in the southern Netherlands ... The great court bibliophiles collected both, often including devotional books ofgreat quality.

Illuminating the Renaissance

This comprehensive and richly illustrated catalogue focuses on the finest illustrated manuscripts produced in Europe during the great epoch in Flemish illumination. During this aesthetically fertile period – beginning in 1467 with the reign of the Burgundian duke Charles the Bold and ending in 1561 with the death of the artist Simon Bening – the art of book painting was raised to a new level of sophistication. Sharing inspiration with the celebrated panel painters of the time, illuminators achieved astonishing innovations in the handling of color, light, texture, and space, creating a naturalistic style that would dominate tastes throughout Europe for nearly a century. Centering on the notable artists of the period – Simon Marmion, the Vienna Master of Mary of Burgundy, Gerard David, Gerard Horenbout, Bening, and others – the catalogue examines both devotional and secular manuscript illumination within a broad context: the place of illuminators within the visual arts, including artistic exchange between book painters and panel painters; the role of court patronage and the emergence of personal libraries; and the international appeal of the new Flemish illumination style. Contributors to the catalogue include Maryan W. Ainsworth, curator of European paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; independent scholar Catherine Reynolds; and Elizabeth Morrison, assistant curator of manuscripts at the Getty Museum. Illuminating the Renaissance is published in conjunction with an exhibition organized by the Getty Museum, the Royal Academy of Arts, London, and the British Library to be held at the Getty Museum from June 17 to September 7, 2003, and at the Royal Academy of Arts from November 25, 2003 to February 22, 2004.

Paradise Reframed

54 Although “we do not know enough about how books were read in the past,”55 the one area in which early modern reading habits have been studied in- as well as extensively is devotional reading, ...

Paradise Reframed

In 1677, John Dryden, poet laureate to the restored Charles II, published ‘The State of Innocence’. Emphatically advertised on its title page as ‘an opera,’ Dryden’s book was based on ‘Paradise Lost’, John Milton’s 1667 epic about the fall and eventual restoration of mankind. In the heated political climate of the 1670s, the publication of this libretto suggested the bold and cunning appropriation of an idiosyncratic text widely viewed, even then, as a mirror of its author’s theological and political opposition to the Restoration establishment. Focusing on the historical background to Dryden’s ‘reframing’ of ‘Paradise Lost’, this study recovers the various and often surprising contexts in which both works were written, ranging from Restoration foreign and domestic policy to the contemporary book market and early modern habits of interpretation. As becomes clear, the process of adaptation by which Dryden, ‘Servant to His Majesty’, reconfigures ‘Paradise Lost’ as an affirmatively royalist text skillfully defuses the radical and subversive potential of Milton’s original, while at the same time substituting, through prefaces and topical allusions, a clear political message of Dryden’s own. Seen together in their shared cultural-historical context, the intertwined histories of both texts shed light on the deeply politicised nature of Restoration literary culture, offering a fresh view of the early reception history of a disputed and ‘pre-canonical’ ‘Paradise Lost’.

A Miscellany for Bibliophiles

The binding was questioned on the basis of its tooling , which is extremely shallow . ... basing my decision on the fact that none of the examples of the Devotional Binder's work that I have seen in this country in any way resembles ...

A Miscellany for Bibliophiles

Studies the life and works of the twentieth century American author, describing the childhood and adult experiences that became common themes in many of his stories and novels.

Books and Bookmen

betta it is only known that his devotional library , at least , has found its way into the market . ... but never a Virgil ; and of Pixérécourt , the dramatist , who founded the Société des Bibliophiles Français .

Books and Bookmen


The Court as a Stage

Most of the bibliophiles below Philip the Good in Table 1 can be seen as imitators , because they commissioned ... though : Margaret of York had a preference for devotional texts ; and Baudouin de Lannoy is exceptional in that we know ...

The Court as a Stage

European and English courtly culture and history reappraised through the prism of the court as theatre.

Reading in the Wilderness

Private Devotion and Public Performance in Late Medieval England Jessica Brantley ... time.4 Although recent scholarship has amply challenged the simple story of ancient bards and mumbling monks who give way to modern bibliophiles, ...

Reading in the Wilderness

Just as twenty-first-century technologies like blogs and wikis have transformed the once private act of reading into a public enterprise, devotional reading experiences in the Middle Ages were dependent upon an oscillation between the solitary and the communal. In Reading in the Wilderness, Jessica Brantley uses tools from both literary criticism and art history to illuminate Additional MS 37049, an illustrated Carthusian miscellany housed in the British Library. This revealing artifact, Brantley argues, closes the gap between group spectatorship and private study in late medieval England. Drawing on the work of W. J. T. Mitchell, Michael Camille, and others working at the image-text crossroads, Reading in the Wilderness addresses the manuscript’s texts and illustrations to examine connections between reading and performance within the solitary monk’s cell and also outside. Brantley reimagines the medieval codex as a site where the meanings of images and words are performed, both publicly and privately, in the act of reading.

Picturing Devotion Anew in Psalter Hours of Yolande of Soissons

The secondary literature on Books of Hours tends to focus on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries , when the form came into its own under the patronage of bibliophiles like Jean de Berry , and the Book of Hours itself became an ...

Picturing Devotion Anew in Psalter Hours  of Yolande of Soissons