The Big Bankroll

Arnold Rothstein (1882–1928) was described in the newspapers of the 1920s as "a sportsman," "a gambler," and "the man who fixed the 1919 World Series.

The Big Bankroll

Arnold Rothstein (1882–1928) was described in the newspapers of the 1920s as "a sportsman," "a gambler," and "the man who fixed the 1919 World Series." But he was much more than that. A bootlegger and labor racketeer, he corrupted politicians, promoted crooked stock sales, and imported narcotics. And, perhaps most importantly, he transformed organized crime from a thuggish activity practiced by hoodlums into a big business, run like a corporation, with himself at the top. For twenty years, the name of Arnold Rothstein symbolized money—big-time money, gambling money, racket money, illegal money, millions upon millions of dollars. His share was ninety percent of any deal; he was never indicted for a single crime; he always won at cards and horses. And, despite his involvement in dozens of murders and hundreds of other crimes, his luck never ran out. At least not until 1928, the year in which he was fatally shot. The perpetrators—and Rothstein's millions—were never found. The Big Bankroll is the definitive biography of the man known simply as Mr. Big. In it, Leo Katcher reveals not only sordid details of the life of America's most powerful gambler, but illuminates the whole era in which crime became king.

The Big Bankroll

Yet, his influence spread across the continent, reached to Europe, to Asia, to the Caribbean. He was never convicted of breaking a law, yet he was the Grey Eminence of Crime. He was the “Big Bankroll” of the underworld.

The Big Bankroll

Arnold Rothstein (1882-1928) was described in the newspapers of the 1920s as “a sportsman.” “a gambler.” “the man who fixed the 1919 World Series.” But he was much more than that. A bootlegger and labor racketeer, he corrupted politicians, promoted crooked stock sales, and imported narcotics. And, perhaps most importantly, he transformed organized crime from a thuggish activity practiced by hoodlums into a big business. run like a corporation, with himself at the top. For twenty years, the name of Arnold Rothstein symbolized money—big-time money, gambling money, racket money, illegal money, millions upon millions of dollars. His share was ninety percent of any deal; he was never indicted for a single crime: he always won at cards and horses. And, despite his involvement in dozens of murders and hundreds of other crimes, his luck never ran out. At least not until 1928, the year in which he was fatally shot. The perpetrators—and Rothstein's millions—were never found. The Big Bankroll is the definitive biography of the man known simply as Mr. Big. In it, Leo Katcher reveals not only the sordid details of the life of America's most powerful gambler, but illuminates the whole era in which crime became king. Leo Katcher was a reporter for the New York Post during Rothstein’s reign, and spent ten years researching this book, interviewing Lucky Luciano. Carolyn Behar (Rothstein's widow), and dozens of others.-Print ed. “This well-written book—part biography, part social history—is as fascinating as a dozen works of fiction, and a good deal more frightening.”—Spectator “Leo Katcher, who was a newspaperman in the days when Rothstein ruled, has brought not only the man but his times back to life. This is a vivid, fascinating book....Katcher does not glamorize Rothstein: he dissects him skillfully and explains him and his corrupt associates and the conditions which made it possible for such men to become wealthy and powerful....Katcher has done a superb job.”—Quentin Reynolds. Saturday Review

Boxing and the Mob

David W. Maurer, The Big Con: The Story of the Confidence Man (New York: Anchor Books/Doubleday, 1999), 12. 1. THE MAN WHO FIXED THE 1919 WORLD SERIES 1. Leo Katcher, The Big Bankroll: The Life and Times of Arnold Rothstein (New York: ...

Boxing and the Mob

Boxing and the Mob explores the heavy influence of the mob on boxing in the 1930s through the early 1960s. It profiles boxers such as Abe Attell and Sonny Liston and infamous mobsters including Owney Madden and Frankie Carbo. In addition, this book details many of the most notorious fixed boxing matches in the sport’s history.

Fighting Organized Crime

F. Scott Fitzgerald , The Great Gatsby , 69–74 , 134–35 , 166–67 , 171–73 . 2. ... Herbert Asbury , The Gangs of New York : An Informal History of the Underworld ; Katcher , Big Bankroll , 230 , 232 ; Craig Thompson and Allen Raymond ...

Fighting Organized Crime

Mary M. Stolberg brings to life the dramatic interplay between crime and politics in New York City during the 1930s, from the emergence of organized crime as a political issue in Fiorella La Guardia's 1929 mayoral campaign to the appointment of Thomas E. Dewey as special prosecutor and his use of that position to further his presidential ambitions.

Frugal Video Poker

The big bankroll question you need to answer before you enter the casino is: How much money should you take to the casino as you start on the path to smarter VP play? Viktor discusses this subject in depth in Chapters 10 and 11, ...

Frugal Video Poker

Frugal Video Poker is the most comprehensive book ever written on practicing, playing, and winning at this popular casino game. Video poker is beatable when you know what pay schedules to look for and how to play when you find them. Whether you want to play for profit or merely make your money last longer in a casino,Frugal Video Poker will take you where you want to go. Beginners are walked through the basics, first learning to distinguish between good and bad paytables, then playing the strategies that maximize the machine's potential. Players who already have some experience will discover crucial bridge concepts that lead to improved results. For experts,Frugal Video Poker covers special opportunities, such as tournaments, promotions, progressives, and the cutting-edge new games--an extensive resource section paves the way to advanced study. And everyone can benefit from the detailed lessons on how to use readily available video poker computer software to take the game to its highest level.

The Big Bankroll

The Big Bankroll


Betting the Line

Quoted in Katcher , The Big Bankroll , pp . 144-45 . 17. New York Times , November 6 , 1928 , p . 22 ; Longstreet , Win or Lose , pp . 171–72 ; Chafetz , Play the Devil , pp . 422–32 ; Katcher , The Big Bankroll , esp . PP . 326–35 .

Betting the Line

A study of gambling, particularly sports gambling, and how it has thrived in American culture. According to Davies and Abram, the culture of betting results from two complementary influences in American society: risk-taking and speculation. This is the first effort by academic writers to describe and interpret the history of sports wagering in the United States. Although many books have been written about 3how to bet and win, 4 Betting the Line presents a serious history of this popular activity in Colonial and Civil War eras to today, from early betting on horse racing and baseball to the modern venues of basketball and football. By considering topics as diverse as the business of a bookie, the expansion of legalized gambling, and the increase in popularity of televised sports, the authors offer readers an insightful look into a practice that has become commonplace in American popular culture. In a mere seventy years, the number of states where gambling is legal jumped from one to forty-eight. Yet Nevada remains the only state where sports betting is legal. This book challenges many long-standing myths and stereotypes that revolve around the enterprise, arguing that sports gambling is reflective of the American free enterprise culture.

The Money Trail

Katcher, The Big Bankroll, 346. Ibid., 338. Ibid., 335. ... Herbert Mitgang, Once Upon a Time in New York: Jimmy Walker, Franklin Roosevelt, and the Last Great Battle of the Jazz Age (New York: Free Press, 2000), 20. Ibid., 21.

The Money Trail

The untold story of the man who followed the money to bust Al Capone and clean up America's first great crime wave.

The Big Book of Jewish Baseball

... Big Bankroll ” never bet on any game he hadn ' t already rigged . When he was still a teenager , Arnold had amassed a few thousand dollars . Some of his money he loaned out at exorbitant interest . If you missed a payment , Arnold ...

The Big Book of Jewish Baseball

The first comprehensive, encyclopaedic work devoted exclusively to every Jewish contributor, large and small, to Major League Baseball. Its packed with: Rare photographs of players on and off the field; Full player statistics; Rare memorabilia; Exclusive original interviews. Jews who impacted upon the Great American Pastime extend far beyond the record strikeouts and round trippers of the legendary Sandy Koufax and Hank Greenberg. And there are scores of ballplayers like Lipman Pike, Shawn Green, Cal Abrams and Eddie Zosky whose little-known Baseball stories will touch or amuse readers of any background. Beyond life-time batting averages, there are intriguing players like catcher Moe Berg who served his country as a secret agent during WWII. While the tragic life of Bruce Gardner may bring tears to readers eyes, the exploits of 'Clown Princes' Al Schact and Max Patkin will have fans rolling with laughter. Nowhere else will one read tributes to great Jewish baseball executives and owners whose vision built some of historys most successful teams. Al Rosen may have gone from the All-Star team to the front-office Hall of Fame, but some of the most famous self-made success stories of this century honed their competitive spirit on the stickball courts of Jewish ghettos. This one-of-a-kind book will be much-in-demand by both baseball and Judaica book buyers.

The First Arc of the Great Circle

We decided to check into a non-classy motel so as to save our big bankroll for the casinos. I think our joint bankroll was almost, well two to three hundred buckaroos. We had to do some heavy acting, so as not to be thrown out of town ...

The First Arc of the Great Circle

Early Reviews The Arc is full of golden nuggets. One just has to mine them for themselves if they haven’t already. The First Arc is a three dimensional ‘On the Road’. We travel on land, air and sea, from the desert to the Alps, Las Vegas to Mallorca, and from bliss to despair and back up again forever. Peter has done what most of us only wish we had done. The ocean, like life, has currents which go in great circles. Life arcs around for most of us until we learn what we need to learn. I found many of my answers here. I have known Peter for decades and we now know what grace abounds for even us unlovelies. Peter’s quest for fullness and total satisfaction has sent him on an incredible journey. I have never known an unknown that has met so many well knowns. What is this brush with fame for? The answers are here for you and me. Peter is ‘too humble’ to mention this. He is now working on his 63rd career.

World s Worst Crimes

Big. Bankroll. Arnold 'The Brain' Rothstein masterminded the transformation of the New York criminal underworld into a series of highly efficient organized crime syndicates, operating gambling, prostitution, bootlegging and narcotics ...

World s Worst Crimes

The World's Worst Crimes takes you deep into the disturbing world of psychopaths, career criminals, and serial killers. From the Woman in the Box and the Online Murderer to the Düsseldorf Vampire and the House of Horror, this book delves into every major category of crime, sifting through the evidence to present a grisly, compelling, and blood-s...

The Big Tech Score

A consistent, steady approach can yield great results, but everyone will try to convince you that it's all or nothing—“No pain, no gain ” and all that. ... To win on Wall Street you don't need to start with a huge bankroll.

The Big Tech Score

Insights for today's hot stocks, and winning strategies fortomorrow's, from Wall Street's #1 Tech Analyst This is not your grandpa's Wall Street. Stocks are more volatilenow than ever. Even with all their potential for meteoric success,high tech investments are synonymous with high risk. Thisentertaining primer, by one of the leading tech analysts on WallStreet, offers a practical step-by-step guide for identifyingtomorrow's hot stocks today. Why do certain technology companies succeed while others falter anddisappear? Which businesses will rule the post-PC era? Kwatinetzdiscusses what's coming down the pike in the next few years and whothe key players will be. He shows how to filter out the noise, and come up with anindependent assessment of how much a stock is worth, and revealsten rules of thumb that will help investors build a powerfulportfolio.

Rothstein

History remembers Arnold Rothstein as the man who fixed the 1919 World Series, an underworld genius.

Rothstein

History remembers Arnold Rothstein as the man who fixed the 1919 World Series, an underworld genius. The real-life model for The Great Gatsby's Meyer Wolfsheim and Nathan Detroit from Guys and Dolls, Rothstein was much more—and less—than a fixer of baseball games. He was everything that made 1920s Manhattan roar. Featuring Jazz Age Broadway with its thugs, speakeasies, showgirls, political movers and shakers, and stars of the Golden Age of Sports, this is a biography of the man who dominated an age. Arnold Rothstein was a loan shark, pool shark, bookmaker, thief, fence of stolen property, political fixer, Wall Street swindler, labor racketeer, rumrunner, and mastermind of the modern drug trade. Among his monikers were "The Big Bankroll," "The Brain," and "The Man Uptown." This vivid account of Rothstein's life is also the story of con artists, crooked cops, politicians, gang lords, newsmen, speakeasy owners, gamblers and the like. Finally unraveling the mystery of Rothstein's November 1928 murder in a Times Square hotel room, David Pietrusza has cemented The Big Bankroll's place among the most influential and fascinating legendary American criminals. 16 pages of black-and-white photographs are featured.

The Big Onion Guide to New York City

Ten Historic Tours Seth I. Kamil, Eric Wakin, Big Onion Walking Tours (New York, N.Y.). The club dates back to a period when ... They noticed a “little man in a silk suit, with a diamond stickpin in his tie, flashing a huge bankroll.

The Big Onion Guide to New York City

This witty, informative walking guide includes nine walking tours, plus a 5-borough driving tour, peppered with informative sidebars, illustrations, and photos from the collection at the New-York Historical Society. Seth Kamil and Eric Wakin's tour company, Big Onion Walking Tours conducts more than 1,200 tours of New York City for more than 35,000 people each year.

Adventures of a Jazz Age Lawyer

Big. Bankroll. and. the. Little. Flower. Arnold Rothstein, high-stakes gambler and reputed fixer of the 1919 World Series, was a fount of liquidity for the major profit centers of Jazz Age New York's underworld: bootlegging, fencing, ...

Adventures of a Jazz Age Lawyer

Adventures of a Jazz Age Lawyer is the lively story of legal giant Nathan Burkan, whose career encapsulated the coming of age of the institutions, archetypes, and attitudes that define American popular culture. With a client list that included Charlie Chaplin, Al Jolson, Frank Costello, Victor Herbert, Mae West, Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt, Arnold Rothstein, and Samuel Goldwyn, Burkan was “New York’s Spotlight Lawyer” for more than three decades. He was one of the principal authors of the epochal Copyright Act of 1909 and the guiding spirit behind the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (Ascap), which provided the first practical means for songwriters to collect royalties for public performances of their works, revolutionizing the music business and the sound of popular music. While the entertainment world adapted to the disruptive technologies of recorded sound, motion pictures, and broadcasting, Burkan’s groundbreaking work laid the legal foundation for the Great American Songbook and the Golden Age of Hollywood, and it continues to influence popular culture today. Gary A. Rosen tells stories of dramatic and uproarious courtroom confrontations, scandalous escapades of the rich and famous, and momentous clashes of powerful political, economic, and cultural forces. Out of these conflicts, the United States emerged as the world’s leading exporter of creative energy. Adventures of a Jazz Age Lawyer is an engaging look at the life of Nathan Burkan, a captivating history of entertainment and intellectual property law in the early twentieth century, and a rich source of new discoveries for anyone interested in the spirit of the Jazz Age.

The Great Gatsby

... 26 (F. Scott Fitzgerald Issue, Summer 1980), 189–221, for a discussion of D. W. Griffith's influence on Fitzgerald during the early years of the movies. 32 See Leo Katcher, The Big Bankroll (New York: Harper, Introduction xix.

The Great Gatsby

Jay Gatsby's lavish lifestyle in a mansion on Long Island's gold coast encapsulates the spirit, excitement and violence of the era Fitzgerald named 'sthe Jazz Age'. Impelled by his love for Daisy Buchanan, Gatsby seeks nothing less than to recapture the moment five years earlier when his best and brightest dreams - his 'sunutterable visions' - seemed to be incarnated in her kiss. A moving portrayal of the power of romantic imagination, as well as the pathos and courage entailed in the pusuit of an unattainable dream, The Great Gatsby is a classic fiction of hope and disillusion. (Quelle: Buchdeckel verso).

Catalog of Copyright Entries

BIG BOYS DON'T CRY ; W & m Liz Anderson , O Yonah Music Co. , 8Feb62 ; EU706113 . BIG BOYS DON'T CRY ... BIG , BAD BRUCE ; W & m Randy Sparks ( Woyd A. Sparks ) o Lloyd A. ( Randy ) ... BIG BANKROLL ; w Dee Katcher , m Herschel Gilbert .

Catalog of Copyright Entries


The Fix Is In

Both came up empty - handed , but the advice they received was unanimous : The man they needed to see was New York gambling king Arnold Rothstein , known as " The Big Bankroll . " By 1919 Arnold Rothstein was one of New York's best ...

The Fix Is In

On September 27, 1865, gambler Kane McLoughlin paid William Wansley $100 to ensure that the Brooklyn Eckfords would beat the Mutuals of New York. Wansley bribed Mutuals shortstop Tom Devyr and third baseman Ed Duffy to join the plot. The result was a 23-11 win by the Eckfords in a game marked by "passed balls and...muffed easy flys." Baseball was faced with its first gambling scandal. This is a comprehensive account of gambling and game fixing scandals that have gripped the nation. Attention is rightly focused on the best known incidents (e.g., the Black Sox scandal and the Pete Rose case), but the lesser known scandals are covered in-depth as well. Included are two chapters on game fixing scandals in the minor leagues.

The Last Days of Big Grassy Fork

Isn't that what dear old Uncle Frank kept telling us all the time he was planning to leave his big bankroll to charity? Anyway, where're we gonna find anybody who would touch this job now. Certainly no professional, not for what we ...

The Last Days of Big Grassy Fork

The Last Days of Big Grassy Fork recounts newspaperman Hunter James's attempts to save his 100-year-old family farm and homestead from extinction. Wise, irreverent, pugnacious, and often hilarious, James fights back against the galloping urbanization of his beloved North Carolina piedmont. Interweaving current affairs and family history, James details the growth of the Winston-Salem area as a center of Moravian piety and later as the world's largest tobacco manufacturing center. This personal history shows he is not the only James to have had a difficult time fitting in with the neighbors' idea of progress; his family's trouble in the Piedmont began early. In 1904 his grandfather was flooded out of a brothel in his birthday suit, and he later scandalized the local Baptist church with drunken sermons, exposing the dark secrets of the congregation. James's unique sense of the absurd, and his willingness to play the fool, make for entertaining reading as each of his efforts at preservation fail miserably. He accidentally torches a neighbor's barn in an attempt to burn off his best pasture land, as was always done in the past; he squanders enormous amounts of money vainly trying to save his farm by becoming the piedmont's preeminent lord of the manor, vintner, wine snob, and horseman; and he finally seals his own doom when in alliance with his neighbors he inadvertently creates the "world's largest garbage pit." The book ends with an eloquent plea for a true agrarianism in the modern South, for the need to strike a balance between the call for industrial expansion and the desire to preserve the land.