The Big Book of Restorative Justice

Four Classic Justice & Peacebuilding Books in One Volume

The Big Book of Restorative Justice

For the first time, the four most popular restorative justice books in the Justice & Peacebuilding series—The Little Book of Restorative Justice: Revised and Updated, The Little Book of Victim Offender Conferencing, The Little Book of Family Group Conferences, and The Little Book of Circle Processes—are available in one affordable volume. Restorative justice, with its emphasis on identifying the justice needs of everyone involved in a crime, is a worldwide movement of growing influence that is helping victims and communities heal while holding criminals accountable for their actions. This is not a soft-on-crime, feel-good philosophy, but rather a concrete effort to bring justice and healing to everyone involved in a crime. Circle processes draw from the Native American tradition of gathering in a circle to solve problems as a community. Peacemaking circles are used in neighborhoods, in schools, in the workplace, and in social services to support victims of all kinds, resolve behavior problems, and create positive climates. Each book is written by a scholar at the forefront of these movements, making this important reading for classrooms, community leaders, and anyone involved with conflict resolution.

The Little Book of Restorative Justice in Education

Fostering Responsibility, Healing, and Hope in Schools

The Little Book of Restorative Justice in Education

Much more than a response to harm, restorative justice nurtures relational, interconnected school cultures. The wisdom embedded within its principles and practices is being welcomed at a time when exclusionary discipline and zero tolerance policies are recognized as perpetuating student apathy, disproportionality, and the school-to-prison pipeline. Relying on the wisdom of early proponents of restorative justice, the daily experiences of educators, and the authors’ extensive experience as classroom teachers and researchers, this Little Book guides the growth of restorative justice in education (RJE) into the future. Incorporating activities, stories, and examples throughout the book, three major interconnected and equally important aspects of restorative justice in education are explained and applied: creating just and equitable learning environments; building and maintaining healthy relationships; healing harm and transforming conflict. The Little Book of Restorative Justice in Education is a reference that practitioners can turn to repeatedly for clarity and consistency as they implement restorative justice in educational settings.

The Little Book of Race and Restorative Justice

Black Lives, Healing, and US Social Transformation

The Little Book of Race and Restorative Justice

Racial Justice and Restorative Justice Working Together to Transform the Black Experience in America This timely work will inform scholars and practitioners on the subjects of pervasive racial inequity and the healing offered by restorative justice practices. Addressing the intersectionality of race and the US criminal justice system, social activist Fania E. Davis explores how restorative justice has the capacity to disrupt patterns of mass incarceration through effective, equitable, and transformative approaches. Eager to break the still-pervasive, centuries-long cycles of racial prejudice and trauma in America, Davis unites the racial justice and restorative justice movements, aspiring to increase awareness of deep-seated problems as well as positive action toward change. In The Little Book of Race and Restorative Justice, Davis highlights real restorative justice initiatives that function from a racial justice perspective; these programs are utilized in schools, justice systems, and communities, intentionally seeking to ameliorate racial disparities and systemic inequities. Furthermore, she looks at initiatives that strive to address the historical harms against African Americans throughout the nation. This newest addition the Justice and Peacebuilding series is a much needed and long overdue examination of the issue of race in America as well as a beacon of hope as we learn to work together to repair damage, change perspectives, and strive to do better.

The Little Book of Restorative Justice for Older Adults

Finding Solutions to the Challenges of an Aging Population

The Little Book of Restorative Justice for Older Adults

Exploring Restorative Justice Practices as a Compelling Response to the Challenges of an Aging Population As our global population ages, conflicts and difficult conversations emerge. How will older adults decide who will make end-of-life health and financial decisions for them? When will dad need to move out of his home and into long-term care? We can’t have mom living with us anymore because it’s just too hard. Why are my children fighting over where I will live? Why is my son taking money from me? These are challenging scenarios that ever-increasing numbers of people are facing. Sometimes these difficulties are discussed in catastrophic terms: Untenable health-care costs Exhausted pension funds Crises in home-care and long-term housing And other concerns Certainly, there are some reasons to worry; however, the challenges facing older adults can be an opportunity for positive change. The Little Book of Restorative Justice for Older Adults is about providing safe and respectful processes to assist in resolving conflict and addressing abuse involving older adults, families, caregivers, and communities. Authors Julie Friesen and Wendy Meek explore ideas to help connect and support people, building on the strengths and capacities of older adults and their families, in order to strengthen communities. Restorative justice dialogues help older adults and their families talk constructively and safely to find ways to move forward together.

The Little Book of Restorative Justice for Colleges and Universities, Second Edition

Repairing Harm and Rebuilding Trust in Response to Student Misconduct

The Little Book of Restorative Justice for Colleges and Universities, Second Edition

A Practitioner's Reference and Guide to Implement Restorative Justice on Campus Here’s a call to colleges and universities to consider implementing restorative practices on their campuses, ensuring fair treatment of students and staff while minimizing institutional liability, protecting the campus community, and boosting morale, from an associate dean of student affairs who has put these models to work on his campus. Restorative justice is a collaborative decision-making process that includes victims, offenders, and others who are seeking to hold offenders accountable by having them (a) accept and acknowledge responsibility for their offenses, (b) to the best of their ability, repair the harm they caused to victims and communities, and (c) work to reduce the risk of re-offense by building positive social ties to the community. David Karp writes in his introduction, “As a student affairs administrator, I have become deeply committed to the concept and practice of restorative justice. I have experienced how it can work given the very real pressures among campus conduct administrators to manage high case loads, ensure fair treatment, minimize institutional liability, protect the campus community, boost morale in a division with high turnover, and help students learn from their mistakes without creating insurmountable obstacles to their future successes.”

If These Walls Could Talk

Community Muralism and the Beauty of Justice

If These Walls Could Talk

Philadelphia's community muralism movement is transforming the City of Brotherly Love into the Mural Capital of the World. This remarkable groundswell of public art includes some 3,500 wall-sized canvases: On warehouses and on schools, on mosques and in jails, in courthouses and along overpasses. In If These Walls Could Talk, Maureen O'Connell explores the theological and social significance of the movement. She calls attention to some of the most startling and powerful works it has produced and describes the narratives behind them. In doing so, O'Connell illustrates the ways that the arts can help us think about and work through the seemingly inescapable problems of urban poverty and arrive at responses that are both creative and effective. This is a book on American religion. It incorporates ethnography to explore faith communities that have used larger-than-life religious imagery to proclaim in unprecedented public ways their self-understandings, memories of the past, and visions of the future. It also examines the way this art functions in larger public discourse about problems facing every city in America. But If These Walls Could Talk is also theological text. It considers the theological implications of this most democratic expression of public art, mindful of the three components of every mural: the pieces themselves, those who create them, and those who interpret them. It illuminates a kind of beauty that seeks after social change or, in other words, the largely unexplored relationship between theological aesthetics and ethics.

Restorative Justice Pocketbook

Restorative Justice Pocketbook

Schools that have adopted the ancient principles of restorative justice in their approach to behaviour management report better relationships with young people, greater engagement in learning and a greater development of social and emotional competence among learners. No surprise, then, that interest in restorative practices is growing. It's all about relationships. Wrongdoing is viewed through a 'relational lens'. All those responsible for and affected by the behaviour are involved in solving the problem. Working in conference with a teacher/facilitator, participants come to understand the harm done to people and relationships. Accepting that such harm creates obligations and liabilities, they then focus on repairing the damage and putting things right. Expert practitioners Margaret and David provide a thorough grounding in restorative practice, with worked examples and easy-to-follow teacher scripts to get you started. If RJ is new to you, you'll be a convert in no time! 'Concise, comprehensive and accessible, this book is an essential companion for any school beginning its restorative journey and an aide-memoire for those already embarked.' Mick Levens, Deputy Head, Forest Hill School 'I welcome this pocketbook as a practical and clear guide for school staff on using the spectrum of restorative practices with pupils.' Graham Robb, Education Consultant and Youth Justice Board member 'If you're searching for the 'something' in the 'something must done' be mantra, you should read this book. It de-mystifies the use of restorative approaches in schools, clearly and simply outlining theory and practice, as well as offering a persuasive case for change. Its straightforward, informative style and common-sense, step-by-step approach make it essential and enjoyable reading for both new and experienced practitioners.' Si?n Williams, Behaviour Inclusion Co-ordinator, London Borough of Lewisham

Young People, Crime and Justice

Young People, Crime and Justice

In the minds of the general public, young people and crime are intrinsically linked; wide-spread belief persists that such activities are a result of the ‘permissive 1960s’ and the changing face of the traditional nuclear family. Roger Hopkins Burke challenges these preconceptions and offers a detailed and comprehensive introduction to youth crime and the subsequent response from the criminal justice system. This extended and fully updated new edition explores: The development of young people and attempts to educate, discipline, control and construct them, Criminological explanations and empirical evidence of why young people become involved in criminality, The system established by the Youth Justice Board, its theoretical foundations, and the extent of its success, Alternative approaches to youth justice around the globe and the apparent homogenisation throughout the neoliberal world. The second edition also includes new chapters looking at youth justice in the wider context of social policy and comparative youth justice. Young People, Crime and Justice is the perfect undergraduate critical introduction to the youth justice system, following a unique left-realist perspective while providing a balanced account of the critical criminology agenda, locating the practical working of the system in the critical socio-economic context. It is essential reading for students taking modules on youth crime, youth justice and contemporary social and criminal justice policy. Text features include key points, chapter summaries and review questions.

Change of Heart

Justice, Mercy, and Making Peace with My Sister's Killer

Change of Heart

"The story of [an] uneven journey to confronting and reconciling with [the teenager who murdered Bishop's sister and brother-in-law, taking] on the larger issues of restorative justice, life sentences, and incarceration in the criminal justice system, ... [acknowledging] the personal cost of advocating for mercy for people convicted of serious crimes"--Amazon.com.

Controversies in Victimology

Controversies in Victimology

Controversies in Victimology features original works of noted scholars and practitioners, aiming to shed light on the debates over, the media attention on, and the psychology behind victimization. This book discusses the controversies from all sides of the debate, and attempts to reconcile the issues in order to move the field forward. Organized around topical areas, focusing on 10 specific issues. Academic experts and professionals in varied fields examine controversial issues.