The Bloody Chamber And Other Stories

And it is this very lack of homogeneity that gives this collection its impressive
complexity — it uses the physical form of the story collection to approach its
theme obliquely, variously, from ten strikingly different angles. The Bloody
Chamber is ...

The Bloody Chamber And Other Stories

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY HELEN SIMPSON From familiar fairy tales and legends - Red Riding Hood, Bluebeard, Puss in Boots, Beauty and the Beast, vampires and werewolves - Angela Carter has created an absorbing collection of dark, sensual, fantastic stories.

Horribly sexy How sexuality becomes gothic in Angela Carters The Bloody Chamber

The story The Bloody Chamber is one often short stories in Angela Carter's
collection The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories, which was published in 1979.
In this particular story she reworks the fairy tale of Blue Beard and transforms it
into a ...

Horribly sexy  How sexuality becomes gothic in Angela Carters  The Bloody Chamber

Scientific Essay from the year 2011 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,7, University of Potsdam (Institut für Anglistik und Amerikanistik), language: English, abstract: The British writer Angela Carter got famous for her short stories and her examination of "The Sadeian Woman". In her writing she often deals with sexuality and power. The story "The Bloody Chamber" is one of ten short stories in Angela Carter’s collection "The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories", which was published in 1979. In this particular story she reworks the fairy tale of Blue Beard and transforms it into a feminist retelling by combining it with results from "The Sadeian Woman". With this work she wants “not simply to point out what is wrong with conventional representations of gender; she is concerned at once to offer different representations, different models” (Day 134). Thus her short stories are full of variety and different topics and take place in a Gothic atmosphere. Carter herself claimed that she followed a realism because she wanted to fulfill the desire of the people to believe the word as fact (Day 134). Therefore she uses topics which are familiar to everybody. Sexuality in a wider sense is one of the predominant ones in her stories. It shows a “sexuality that is situated beyond cultural borders and might therefore be more ‘natural’ than the conventional notions of sexual identity” (Gruss 212). However, the sexuality in "The Bloody Chamber" often seems strange, abhorrent and even disgusting. Thus, especially the sexuality serves to create a Gothic atmosphere by the help of different means. In the following paper I want to examine how this is done by use of three Gothic concepts: The haunting, abject and grotesque, and the uncanny.

Angela Carter and the Fairy Tale

The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories. London: Gollancz, 1979; Penguin, 1981.
, ed. The Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault. London: Gollancz, 1977. . The Sadeian
Woman and the Ideology of Pornography. New York: Pantheon, 1979. Davis ...

Angela Carter and the Fairy Tale

A diverse collection of essays, artwork, interviews, and fiction on Angela Carter.

Role Breaking and Role Remaking in Angela Carter s the Bloody Chamber

Therefore the paper is divided into two sections: The first gives a brief overview about the time period as this text is written against the background of the gothic era.

Role Breaking and Role Remaking in Angela Carter s the Bloody Chamber

Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Institut fur fremdsprachliche Philologien), course: Gothic Fiction, language: English, abstract: The attainment of female subjectivity in spite of female sexual maturation, the oppression of female sexuality, the passive role of females bound in the confines of marriage, and as accumulated property are some of the issues that Carter addresses in The Bloody Chamber within the framework of the fairytale genre. Angela Carter adopts Perrault's fairy-tale Bluebeard in her story The Bloody Chamber and transfers it into a feminist rewriting. She breaks through the prescribed role-understanding of women and men in society. Society defines women as being passive, men as being active in every domain of the everyday life. Angela Carter draws a picture against this stigmatization. She does not define women as being merely subversive; victims of male authority and simply fulfilling their role. She wants to show that women have the ability to gain independence and a free will by giving male qualities to her female characters or letting them not behave like society expects them to behave. In society men are said to be powerful and oppressing their wives. They show true qualities of masculinity and exploit their wife's innocence and naivety. Carter on the one hand portrays men as embodying this prescribed role, but also adds female qualities to their actions and behaviours, or being overpowered by their female counterparts. This paper shall show in how far Angela Carter adapts constructed role models, changes them or invents new ones. Therefore the paper is divided into two sections: The first gives a brief overview about the time period as this text is written against the background of the gothic era. The second part concentrates on The Bloody Chamber, which is first of all based on Perrault's Bluebeard story - to realize the

Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

1 (2004): 67–88. Carter, Angela. The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories. London
: Penguin, 1987. Kaiser, Mary. “Fairy Tale as Sexual Allegory: Intertextu- ality in
Angela Carter's 'The Bloody Chamber,' Review of Contemporary Fiction 14, no.

Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

An accessible one-volume encyclopedia, this addition to the Literary Movements series is a comprehensive reference guide to the history and development of feminist literature, from early fairy tales to works by great women writers of today. Hundred

Encyclopedia of the British Short Story

Bloody. Chamber. and. Other. Stories. 1979 Work Author: Angela Carter The
Bloody Chamber collects 10 of Angela Carter's short stories, linked by their
common source material, familiar tales from the folk tradition including "
Bluebeard," ...

Encyclopedia of the British Short Story

Provides a comprehensive reference to short fiction from Great Britain, Ireland, and the British Commonwealth, featuring some of the most popular writers and works.

Space Conrad and Modernity

Heartless Modernism WHO IS DECEIVED by ' the pounding of my heart in
Angela Carter ' s The Bloody Chamber ? ... besides , and if we are to keep up
with this The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories ( Harmondsworth : Penguin ,
1979 ) , 7 .

Space  Conrad  and Modernity

Recent literary and cultural criticism has taken a spatial turn. Nowadays, to speak is to speak from, to, or in; to know something is to have 'mapped' its discursive operation. This book locates this development within the opposition between a space of things and a space of words, tracingvarious aspects of its emergence from the geopolitical idea of 'closed space' which developed in the early twentieth century to the influence of Saussurean linguistics in contemporary criticism and theory.The focus of the study is the work of Joseph Conrad, in whom the opposition between a space of words and a space of things is strikingly figured. Part I deals with several versions of closed space, using an ancient spatial paradox of God (as the sphere of which the centre is everywhere and thecircumference is nowhere) to raise questions about the relations between geography, language, and interpretation. Part II deals with the agitation around finitude and the limit, and the desperate attempt to discover in the resources of language a means of liberation.Through these ideas the book explores some of the more disreputable, marginal, or unglimpsed elements in modernism - including the rise of spy fiction, anarchist geography, the spiritualist movement, the invention of artificial languages, the history of laughter, and solar energy. Among the figuresdrawn into dialogue with Conrad are John Buchan, Woolf, Joyce, Peter Kropotkin, Rene de Saussure (brother of the famous Ferdinand), Henri Bergson, the filmmakers George Melies and Carol Reed and, in particular, Michel Foucault -- this 'nouvelle cartographe' as Gilles Deleuze described him -- whoseanxious negotiation with spatial ideas touches the book's deepest understanding.

Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women

(She also annexed the myths of the Golden Fleece and the Grail, and retold the
story of the Garden of Eden without Adam.) She was followed ... One of the first
was Angela Carter: The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories (1981).
Subsequently ...

Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women

For a full list of entries and contributors, sample entries, and more, visit the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women website. Featuring comprehensive global coverage of women's issues and concerns, from violence and sexuality to feminist theory, the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women brings the field into the new millennium. In over 900 signed A-Z entries from US and Europe, Asia, the Americas, Oceania, and the Middle East, the women who pioneered the field from its inception collaborate with the new scholars who are shaping the future of women's studies to create the new standard work for anyone who needs information on women-related subjects.

Anagrams of Desire

Bell cites these as including other wolf stories from The Bloody Chamber, 'Wolf-
Alice' and “The Werewolf, but I would also add 'Peter and the Wolf from the Black
Venus collection (Carter, [1985) 1986). According to Bell, Jordan and Carter ...

Anagrams of Desire

This is the only book-length study of Carter's work in media, a critically neglected body of work comprising five radio plays, two film adaptions, and a television documentary, as well as two unrealised screenplays, an operatic libretto, and a stage play.

A Reader s Companion to the Short Story in English

... novel); the Somerset Maugham Award in 1969 for Several Perceptions (1968,
novel); the Cheltenham Literary Festival Award in 1979 for The Bloody Chamber
and Other Stories (1979, short stories); the Maschler Award in 1982 for Sleeping
 ...

A Reader s Companion to the Short Story in English

Although the short story has existed in various forms for centuries, it has particularly flourished during the last hundred years. Reader's Companion to the Short Story in English includes alphabetically-arranged entries for 50 English-language short story writers from around the world. Most of these writers have been active since 1960, and they reflect a wide range of experiences and perspectives in their works. Each entry is written by an expert contributor and includes biography, a review of existing criticism, a lengthier analysis of specific works, and a selected bibliography of primary and secondary sources. The volume begins with a detailed introduction to the short story genre and concludes with an annotated bibliography of major works on short story theory.

Guide to British Prose Fiction Explication

The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories John Bayley , “ The Bloody Chamber and
Other Stories , ” NYRB 39 ( 23 April 1992 ) : 9 – 11 . Patricia Duncker , “ Re -
Imagining the Fairy Tales : Angela Carter ' s Bloody Chamber , ” L & H 10 ( Spring
 ...

Guide to British Prose Fiction Explication

An unannotated bibliography of criticism, mostly journal articles, of prose written during the past two centuries by selected authors either from Britain or clearly part of British culture, including Scot Walter Scott, New Zealander Katherine Mansfield, and Canadian Margaret Atwood. The works cited range from contemporary professional reviews to semiotic interpretations, from New Critical approaches to new historicist readings, from linguistic subtleties to cross-cultural estimations. The arrangement descends from prose author, to title of work, and finally critic. No index. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Fairy Tale as Myth Myth as Fairy Tale

Ms Muffet and Others. Dublin: Attic Press, 1986. ———. Mad and Bad ... The
Golden Phoenix and Other French Canadian Fairy Tales. Retold by Michael
Hornyansky. ... The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories. London: Gollancz, 1979.
Carter ...

Fairy Tale as Myth Myth as Fairy Tale

" Explores the historical rise of the literary fairy tale as genre in the late seventeenth century. In his examinations of key classical fairy tales, Zipes traces their unique metamorphoses in history with stunning discoveries that reveal their ideological relationship to domination and oppression. Tales such as Beauty and the Beast, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, and Rumplestiltskin have become part of our everyday culture and shapers of our identities. In this lively work, Jack Zipes explores the historical rise of the literary fairy tale as genre in the late seventeenth century and examines the ideological relationship of classic fairy tales to domination and oppression in Western society. The fairy tale received its most "mythic" articulation in America. Consequently, Zipes sees Walt Disney's Snow White as an expression of American male individualism, film and literary interpretations of L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz as critiques of American myths, and Robert Bly's Iron John as a misunderstanding of folklore and traditional fairy tales. This book will change forever the way we look at the fairy tales of our youth.

Fairy Tales and Feminism

... position within the English literary tradition,with her exploration of violence and
cruelty through the medium of fairy tales and folktales, especially in The Bloody
Chamber and Other Stories,which contains several rewritings of traditional tales.

Fairy Tales and Feminism

In the 1970s, feminists focused critical attention on fairy tales and broke the spell that had enchanted readers for centuries. By exposing the role of fairy tales in the cultural struggle over gender, feminism transformed fairy-tale studies and sparked a debate that would change the way society thinks about fairy tales and the words "happily ever after." Now, after three decades of provocative criticism and controversy, this book reevaluates the feminist critique of fairy tales. The eleven essays within Fairy Tales and Feminism challenge and rethink conventional wisdom about the fairy-tale heroine and offer new insights into the tales produced by female writers and storytellers. Resisting a one-dimensional view of the woman-centered fairy tale, each essay reveals ambiguities in female-authored tales and the remarkable potential of classical tales to elicit unexpected responses from women. Exploring new texts and contexts, Fairy Tales and Feminism reaches out beyond the national and cultural boundaries that have limited our understanding of the fairy tale. The authors reconsider the fairy tale in French, German, and Anglo-American contexts and also engage African, Indian Ocean, Iberian, Latin American, Indo-Anglian, and South Asian diasporic texts. Also considered within this volume is how film, television, advertising, and the Internet test the fairy tale's boundaries and its traditional authority in defining gender. From the Middle Ages to the postmodern age-from the French fabliau to Hollywood's Ever After and television's Who Wants to Marry a Millionaire?-the essays assembled here cover a broad range of topics that map new territory for fairy-tale studies. Framed by a critical survey of feminist fairy-tale scholarship and an extensive bibliography-the most comprehensive listing of women-centered fairy-tale research ever assembled-Fairy Tales and Feminism is a valuable resource for anyone interested in the intersection of fairy tales and feminism.

Evaporating Genres

Peter Straub's 1979 novel Ghost Story may seem to o√er a veritable motif index
of supernatural tropes, but in fact is a ... Angela Carter, in The Bloody Chamber
and Other Stories (1979), revealed that the fairy-tale redaction—itself virtually a ...

Evaporating Genres

In this wide-ranging series of essays, an award-winning science fiction critic explores how the related genres of science fiction, fantasy, and horror evolve, merge, and finally “evaporate” into new and more dynamic forms. Beginning with a discussion of how literary readers “unlearned” how to read the fantastic during the heyday of realistic fiction, Gary K. Wolfe goes on to show how the fantastic reasserted itself in popular genre literature, and how these genres themselves grew increasingly unstable in terms of both narrative form and the worlds they portray. More detailed discussions of how specific contemporary writers have promoted this evolution are followed by a final essay examining how the competing discourses have led toward an emerging synthesis of critical approaches and vocabularies. The essays cover a vast range of authors and texts, and include substantial discussions of very current fiction published within the last few years.

Why Shakespeare

Angela Carter, The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories (London: Vintage, 1995).
Traditional tales wittily updated. Angela Carter ed., The Virago Book of Fairy
Tales (London: Virago, 1990). Puts the heroines at the centre. Jakob and Wilhelm
 ...

Why Shakespeare

Why is Shakespeare as highly regarded now as he ever has been? This book's answer to this question counters claims that Shakespeare's iconic status is no more than an accident of history. The plays, Belsey argues, entice us into a world we recognize by retelling traditional fairy tales with a difference, each chapter providing a detailed reading.

The Golden Age of Folk and Fairy Tales

Later, in 1812, this tale was revised by Wilhelm, who had gathered some other
versions. ... of Angela Carter's superb rendition, “The Snow Child,” which she
published in her fascinating collection The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories (
1979).

The Golden Age of Folk and Fairy Tales

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, attitudes toward history and national identity fostered a romantic rediscovery of folk and fairy tales. This is the period of the Golden Age of folk and fairy tales, when European folklorists sought to understand and redefine the present through the common tales of the past, and long neglected stories became recognized as cultural treasures. In this rich collection, distinguished expert of fairy tales Jack Zipes continues his lifelong exploration of the story-telling tradition with a focus on the Golden Age. Included are one hundred eighty-two tales--many available in English for the first time--grouped into eighteen tale types. Zipes provides an engaging general Introduction that discusses the folk and fairy tale tradition, the impact of the Brothers Grimm, and the significance of categorizing tales into various types. Short introductions to each tale type that discuss its history, characteristics, and variants provide readers with important background information. Also included are annotations, short biographies of folklorists of the period, and a substantial bibliography. Eighteen original art works by students of the art department of Anglia Ruskin University not only illustrate the eighteen tale types, but also provide delightful—and sometimes astonishing—21st-century artistic interpretations of them.

Angela Carter

The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories (London: Gollancz, 1979; New York:
Harper and Row, 1980; Harmondsworth, Middx: Penguin, 1981). Black Venus's
Tale (with woodcuts by Philip Sutton) (London: Next Editions in association with ...

Angela Carter

This revised new edition reviews Carter's novels in the light of recent critical developments and offers entirely new perspectives on her work. There is now extended discussion of Carter's most widely-studied novels, including The Passion of New Eve and Nights at the Circus, and discussion of the long essay The Sadeian Woman.

Film Out of Bounds

The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories. London: Vintage, 2006. Cronin, Paul (
editor). Herzog on Herzog. New York: Faber and Faber, 2002. Curry, Christopher
Wayne, and John W. Curry. A Taste of Blood: The Films of Her- schell Gordon ...

Film Out of Bounds

Operating outside the commercial boundaries of Hollywood cinema, alternative and independent filmmakers have much to offer the discriminating viewer. Yet they struggle for a place in the popular culture, and even more for recognition by the scholarly community. The specific aim of this book is to provide much-needed critical examination of titles, particularly those by British filmmakers. In-depth commentary from such acclaimed writers as Maitland McDonagh, Jasper Sharp, Johannes Schönherr and Marcus Stiglegger considers filmmakers who work at the very heart of the independent medium, giving the reader specific insight into alternate cinema and the struggles its filmmakers endure. Featured are interviews with both rising and established filmmakers, including the infamous Guy Maddin and Herschell Gordon Lewis. Finally, this collection of interviews and essays boasts a 20th anniversary retrospective on the British cult classic The Company of the Wolves, complete with an exclusive interview with director Neil Jordan.