The Agrarian History of England and Wales Volume 3 1348 1500

The published calendar of the cartulary ( The Boarstall Cartulary , ed . H. E. Salter , Oxford Hist . Soc . , OS LXXXVIII , 1930 ) unfortunately omits field names and is thus inadequate in this connection . 166 VCH Beds . , III , p .

The Agrarian History of England and Wales  Volume 3  1348 1500

The third volume of The Agrarian History of England and Wales, which was first published in 1991, deals with the last century and a half of the Middle Ages. It concerns itself with the new demographic and economic circumstances created in large measure by endemic plague.

Rulership and Rebellion in the Anglo Norman World c 1066 c 1216

42 The Boarstall Cartulary, ed. H.E. Salter, Oxford Record Society, 88 (1930), App., p. 326. 43 Boarstall Cartulary, p. 307; The Red Book of the Exchequer, ed. H. Hall, Rolls Series (3 vols, London, 1896), vol. 1, p. 308. 44 RRAN, vol.

Rulership and Rebellion in the Anglo Norman World  c 1066   c 1216

The importance of the themes of rulership and rebellion in the history of the Anglo-Norman world between 1066 and the early thirteenth century is incontrovertible. The power, government, and influence of kings, queens and other lords pervaded and dominated society and was frequently challenged and resisted. But while biographies of rulers, studies of the institutions and operation of central, local and seigniorial government, and works on particular political struggles abound, many major aspects of rulership and rebellion remain to be explored or further elucidated. This volume, written by leading scholars in the field and dedicated to the pioneering work of Professor Edmund King, will make an original, important and timely contribution to our knowledge and understanding of Anglo-Norman history.

English Historical Documents 1042 1189

Boarstall. The Boarstall Cartulary, ed. H.E.Salter (Oxford, 1930) Bridlington. Chartulary of the Priory of Bridlington, ed. W.T.Lancaster (Leeds, 1912) Brinkburn. Chartulary of Brinkburn Priory, ed. W.Page, Surtees Soc. (1893) Bristol.

English Historical Documents  1042 1189

"English Historical Documents is the most comprehensive, annotated collection of documents on British (not in reality just English) history ever compiled. Conceived during the Second World War with a view to ensuring the most important historical documents remained available and accessible in perpetuity, the first volume came out in 1953, and the most recent volume almost sixty years later. The print series, edited by David C. Douglas, is a magisterial survey of British history, covering the years 500 to 1914 and including around 5,500 primary sources, all selected by leading historians Editors. It has over the years become an indispensable resource for generations of students, researchers and lecturers. EHD is now available in its entirety online. Bringing EHD into the digital age has been a long and complex process. To provide you with first-rate, intelligent searchability, Routledge have teamed up with the Institute of Historical Research (one of the research institutes that make up the School of Advanced Study, University of London http://www.history.ac.uk) to produce EHD Online. The IHR's team of experts have fully indexed the documents, using an exhaustive historical thesaurus developed by the Royal Historical Society for its Bibliography of British and Irish History. The sources include treaties, statutes, declarations, government and cabinet proceedings, military dispatches, orders, acts, sermons, newspaper articles, pamphlets, personal and official letters, diaries and more. Each section of documents and many of the documents themselves are accompanied by editorial commentary. The sources cover a wide spectrum of topics, from political and constitutional issues to social, economic, religious as well as cultural history."--[Résumé de l'éditeur].

Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales 1300 1500 Volume 3 Southern England

7 The Boarstall Cartulary , ed . H. E. Salter and A. H. Cooke ( 1930 ) . The volume is held in Bucks . County Record Office , Aylesbury . The map and a 1970 aerial view to the same scale and position are reproduced in M. W. Beresford ...

Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales  1300   1500  Volume 3  Southern England

This is the third volume of Anthony Emery's magisterial survey, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales, 1300–1500, first published in 2006. Across the three volumes Emery has examined afresh and re-assessed over 750 houses, the first comprehensive review of the subject for 150 years. Covered are the full range of leading homes, from royal and episcopal palaces to manor houses, as well as community buildings such as academic colleges, monastic granges and secular colleges of canons. This volume surveys Southern England and is divided into three regions, each of which includes a separate historical and architectural introduction as well as thematic essays prompted by key buildings. The text is complemented throughout by a wide range of plans and diagrams and a wealth of photographs showing the present condition of almost every house discussed. This is an essential source for anyone interested in the history, architecture and culture of medieval England and Wales.

The Heads of Religious Houses

Ctl. Bilsington: The Cartulary and Terrier of the Priory of Bilsington ... Ctl. Boarstall: The Boarstall Cartulary, ed. ... Ctl. Bridlington: Abstract of the Charters and other documents contained in the Chartulary of the Priory ...

The Heads of Religious Houses

This book is a continuation of The Heads of Religious Houses: England and Wales 940–1216, edited by David Knowles, C. N. L. Brooke and Vera London, which itself is reissued with substantial addenda by Professor Brooke. This present volume continues the lists from 1216 to 1377. In this period further record sources have been provided by episcopal registers, governmental enrolments, court records, and so on. Full references are given for establishing the dates and outline of the career of each abbot or prior, abbess or prioress, when known. The lists are arranged by order: the Benedictine houses (independent, dependencies and alien priories); the Cluniacs; the Grandmontines; the Cistercians; the Carthusians; the Augustinian canons; the Premonstratensians; the Gilbertine order; the Trinitarian houses; the Bonhommes; and the nuns. An introduction discusses the nature, use and history of the lists and examines critically the sources on which they are based.

North east England in the Later Middle Ages

... creature's head to Edward the Confessor and receiving in return land and the custody of Bernwood Forest.107 The story of the boar was depicted in the map of the village of Boarstall contained in a mid - fifteenth - century cartulary ...

North east England in the Later Middle Ages

"The medieval development of the distinct region of north-east England explored through close examination of landscape, religion and history"--Provided by publisher.

Medieval English Conveyances

The Boarstall Cartulary, ed. Revd H.E. Salter, Oxford Historical Society, 1930. The Chartulary of Boxgrove Priory, ed. L. Fleming, Sussex Record Society, 1960. Bract. Bradenstoke C Bray EB Brev. Plac. Brinkburn C Bristol Abbreviations ...

Medieval English Conveyances

This study of the documents used in medieval England for the creation and transfer of interests in real property is the first book devoted exclusively to the subject since the publication of Thomas Madox's Formulare Anglicanum in 1702. The transactions covered include grants in fee and in perpetual alms, leases for life and for years, exchanges, surrenders and releases. Analysis of each kind of transaction is partly by way of commentary on the formulae of deeds, selected from the many thousands found in published cartularies and collections, and partly by relating the deeds to the relevant law of their periods, as found in early treatises, decided cases and the Year Books. The aim is to enable readers to identify and categorise deeds accurately, to appreciate their legal effects and to note instances where the practice of conveyancers and their clients differed from what is supposed to have been the law.

Political Culture in Late Medieval England

175 E 101/37/2 ; C.A.D. , iii . B 3268–71 ; C.C.R. 1381-5 , 449 , 625 ; ibid . , 1385-9 , 97 , 297 ; N.C.M. 14034 . 176 The Boarstall Cartulary , ed . H. E. Salter ( Oxford Historical Soc . , lxxxviii , 1930 ) , nos .

Political Culture in Late Medieval England

An important collection of essays on the subjects of kingship, lordship, warfare and sanctity, penned by the highly respected historian of late medieval England, the late Professor Simon Walker

Domesday People Domesday book

203–19 * Blythburgh Christopher Harper - Bill , Blythburgh Priory Cartulary , Suffolk Charters 2–3 ( Woodbridge , 1980–81 ) BN Bibliothèque Nationale , Paris Boarstall H. E. Salter and A. H. Cooke , The Boarstall Cartulary , Oxford Rec ...

Domesday People  Domesday book

A major genealogical advance: the first authoritative and complete biographical register of persons occurring in Domesday Book.

The Fee Tail and the Common Recovery in Medieval England

BL British Library Boarstall Cartulary H. E. Salter and A. H. Cooke (eds.), The Boarstall Cartulary (Oxford Historical Society, vol. 88, 1930). The Book of M. Clough (ed.), The Book of Bartholomew Bolney Bartholomew Bolney (Sussex ...

The Fee Tail and the Common Recovery in Medieval England

Fee tails were a basic building block for family landholding from the end of the thirteenth to the beginning of the twentieth century. The classic entail was an interest in land which was inalienable and could only pass at death by inheritance to the lineal heirs of the original grantee. Biancalana's study considers the origins, development and use of the entail in later medieval England, and the origins and early use of a reliable legal mechanism for the destruction of individual entails, the common recovery. He untangles the complex history surrounding medieval landholding in this detailed study of the fee tail, the product of extensive research in original sources. This book includes an extensive index of over three hundred common recoveries with discussions of their transactional contexts. A major work which will interest lawyers and historians.

The Accession of Henry II in England

The Boarstall Cartulary , ed . H.E. Salter and A.H. Cooke ( Oxford , 1930 ) . The Book of Fees , ed . H.C. Maxwell Lyte ( London , 1920–31 ) . Bracton's Note Book , ed . W.F. Maitland ( London , 1887 ) .

The Accession of Henry II in England

Detailed examination of the steps by which Henry II negotiated peace and established the authority of his government.

Sir John Aubrey

Bishop White Kennett's list of the Lords of Boarstall shows that following the Conquest , the Manor with its rights and ... The Boarstall Cartulary , commented upon by Professor H. E. Salter in the Oxford Historical Society's Volume ...

Sir John Aubrey


Feudal Assessments and the Political Community under Henry II and His Sons

Salter , Boarstall Cartulary : The Boarstall Cartulary , ed . H. E. Salter , Oxford , 1930 . Sanders , EB : Sanders , I. J. , English Baronies : A Study of their Origin and Descent , 1086-1327 , Oxford , 1960 .

Feudal Assessments and the Political Community under Henry II and His Sons

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1983.

Medieval England

The Boarstall Cartulary , Oxford Hist . Soc . LXXVIII ( 1930 ) does not reproduce the map which is bound with the cartulary in the Bucks . County Record Office . The map will be treated in R. A. Skelton and P. D. A. Harvey , eds .

Medieval England

This book discusses in detail some aspects of life in medieval England still to be seen in the landscape. The perspective of the air photograph conveys a fresh understanding of the physical setting of medieval society, of the interaction between communities and the land upon which they settled and of the varying pattern of the social and economic fabric of the country.

The Open Fields of England

Salter, H. E. (1930), The Boarstall Cartulary, Oxford Historical Society, 88. Salter, H. E. (1934), Cartulary of Osney Abbey, iv, Oxford Historical Society, 97. Salter, H. E. (1935), Cartulary of Osney Abbey, v, Oxford Historical ...

The Open Fields of England

The Open Fields of England describes the open-field system of agriculture that operated in Medieval England before the establishment of present-day farms surrounded by hedges or walls. The volume encompasses a wide range of primary data not previously assembled, to which are added the results of new research based upon a fifty-year study of open-field remains and their related documents. The whole of England is examined, describing eight different kinds of field-system that have been identified, and relating them to their associated land-use and settlement. Details of field structure are explained, such as the demesne, the lord's land, and the tenants' holdings, as well as tenurial arrangements and farming methods. Previous explanations of open-field origins and possible antecedents to medieval fields are discussed. Various types of archaeological and historical evidence relating to Saxon-period settlements and fields are presented, followed by the development of a new theory to explain the lay-out and planned nature of many field systems found in the central belt of England. Of particular interest is the Gazetteer, which is organized by historic counties. Each county has a summary of its fields, including tabulated data and sources for future research, touching on the demesne, yardland size, work-service, assarts, and physical remains of ridge and furrow. The Gazetteer acts as a national hand-list of field systems, opening the subject up to further research and essential to scholars of medieval agriculture.

The Government of England Under Henry I

For the estates held of Wallingford , The Boarstall Cartulary , ed . H. E. Salter , Oxford Historical Society , LXXXVI ( 1930 ) , p . 319. These fees passed to Ralph Basset's sons , Nicholas and Turstin . Ralph also held Colston Basset ...

The Government of England Under Henry I

The is a full-length analysis of the machinery and men of government under Henry I, which looks in much greater detail than is possible for other contemporary states at the way government worked and at the careers of royal servants. Royal government in England in the early twelfth-century was developing fast under political and military pressures. At the centre, above all during the king's long absences in Normandy, new ways of supervision were found, especially in the financial field. Government also provided distinct opportunities in administration, and for the first time it is possible to identify a number of men who were effectively professional administrators. The book will therefore become essential reading on the reign of Henry I and on the general development of English government in the twelfth century.