The Book of Leviathan

The Book of Leviathan

BLEGVAD/BOOK OF LEVIATHAN

Leviathan

Leviathan

After the publication of his masterpiece of political theory, Leviathan, Or the Matter, and Power of Commonwealth Ecclesiastic and Civil, in 1651, opponents charged Thomas Hobbes with atheism and banned and burned his books. The English Parliament, in a search for scapegoats, even claimed that the theories found in Leviathan were a likely cause of the Plague of 1665 and the Great Fire of 1666. For the modern reader, though, Hobbes is more recognized for his popular belief that humanity's natural condition is a state of perpetual war, with life being "solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short." Despite frequent challenges by other philosophers, Leviathan's secular theory of absolutism no longer stands out as particularly objectionable. In the description of the organization of states, moreover, we see Hobbes as strikingly current in his use of concepts that we still employ today, including the ideas of natural law, natural rights, and the social contract. Based on this work, one could even argue that Hobbes created English-language philosophy, insofar as Leviathan was the first great philosophical work written in English and one whose impact continues to the present day.

Metaphor Competition in the Book of Job

Metaphor Competition in the Book of Job

Within the book of Job, the interlocutors (Job, the friends, and Yahweh) seem to largely ignore one another’s arguments. This observation leads some to propose that the dialogue lacks conceptual coherence. Lance Hawley argues that the interlocutors tangentially and sometimes overtly attend to previously stated points of view and attempt to persuade their counterparts through the employment of metaphor. Hawley uses the theoretical approach of Conceptual Metaphor Theory to trace the concepts of speech and animals throughout the dialogue. Beyond explaining the individual metaphors in particular texts, he shows how speech metaphors compete with one another, most perceptibly in the expressions of job’s words are wind. With regard to animal metaphors, coherence is especially perceptible in the job is a predatory animal metaphor. In these expressions, the dialogue demonstrates intentional picking-up on previously stated arguments. Hawley argues that the animal images in the divine speeches are not metaphorical, in spite of recent scholarly interpretation that reads them as such. Rather, Yahweh appears as a sage to question the negative status of wild animals that Job and his friends assume in their significations of people are animals. This is especially apparent in Yahweh’s strophes on the lion and the wild donkey, both of which appear multiple times in the metaphorical expressions of Job and his friends.

The Book of Lamech of Cain

And Leviathan

The Book of Lamech of Cain

There are 2 different Books of Lamech available to Bible scholars. THE BOOK OF LAMECH OF CAIN has been hard to find until recently. Presented in novella form, Father Ichabod Sergeant and his translation team have been cleared by the Vatican to publish this antediluvian document. Written before the flood of Noah, THE BOOK OF LAMECH OF CAIN follows the antediluvian bloodline of Cain and presents answers to questions that have puzzled biblical scholars (such as the Mark of Cain, the Song of the Sword, and the history of Noah's wife, Naamah) for thousands of years. Editor, DEMMON has once again brought forward the dark and the ancient, as he did with Father Esau Martin with THE LOST BOOK OF KING OG

Contested Creations in the Book of Job

The-World-as-It-Ought- And-Ought-Not-to-Be

Contested Creations in the Book of Job

In Contested Creations in the Book of Job: the-world-as-it-ought- and -ought-not-to-be Abigail Pelham examines the perspectives on creation presented by Job’s characters and explores the challenges to their certainties about creative agency and power raised by its epilogue.

The Leviathan in the State Theory of Thomas Hobbes

Meaning and Failure of a Political Symbol

The Leviathan in the State Theory of Thomas Hobbes

Writing in 1938, under the guise of studying the significance of the symbol of the leviathan in Thomas Hobbes's theory of the state, Carl Schmitt, the Hobbes of the 20th century, provides insights into totalitarian forms of government, attacks totalitarianism, and alludes to the demise of the Third Reich.

The Logic of Leviathan

The Moral and Political Theory of Thomas Hobbes

The Logic of Leviathan

Oxford Scholarly Classics brings together a number of great academic works from the archives of Oxford University Press. Reissued in a uniform series design, they will enable libraries, scholars, and students to gain fresh access to some of the finest scholarship of the last century.

The Book of Job

Chronological, Historical and Archaeological Evidence

The Book of Job

The book of Job is paradoxical regarding its historicity as well as its meaning. Although Job is clearly presented as a real, historical person (he lived from 1710 to 1500 near Bozra in Idumea), rabbis and bishops preferred to see it as a moral tale. Despite the main question all over the book being: "why evil prevails?" the answer would be: "please, look at the hippopotamus and the crocodile" (Job 40:1-42:6), which is poetic but quite absurd. However, as Maimonides had already understood a long time ago the Book of Job includes profound ideas and great mysteries and reveals the most important truths. Indeed, Job received a deep and detailed answer in order to know when and how the evil angel, Leviathan a.k.a. Satan, would be defeated by Behemoth the first creature of God (Job 40:19). In a surprising manner, archaeology has shown that all the geographical and historical details in the Book of Job are accurate and reliable.

Playing with Leviathan: Interpretation and Reception of Monsters from the Biblical World

Playing with Leviathan: Interpretation and Reception of Monsters from the Biblical World

Playing with Leviathan explores the theological meaning of Leviathan and other monsters from the biblical world by studying their ancient Near Eastern background and their attestation in biblical texts, early and rabbinic Judaism, Christian theology, Early Modern art and film.