The Book of Yokai

The Book of Yokai invites readers to examine how people create, transmit, and collect folklore, and how they make sense of the mysteries in the world around them.

The Book of Yokai

Monsters, ghosts, fantastic beings, and supernatural phenomena of all sorts haunt the folklore and popular culture of Japan. Broadly labeled yokai, these creatures come in infinite shapes and sizes, from tengu mountain goblins and kappa water spirits to shape-shifting foxes and long-tongued ceiling-lickers. Currently popular in anime, manga, film, and computer games, many yokai originated in local legends, folktales, and regional ghost stories. Drawing on years of research in Japan, Michael Dylan Foster unpacks the history and cultural context of yokai, tracing their roots, interpreting their meanings, and introducing people who have hunted them through the ages. In this delightful and accessible narrative, readers will explore the roles played by these mysterious beings within Japanese culture and will also learn of their abundance and variety through detailed entries, some with original illustrations, on more than fifty individual creatures. The Book of Yokai provides a lively excursion into Japanese folklore and its ever-expanding influence on global popular culture. It also invites readers to examine how people create, transmit, and collect folklore, and how they make sense of the mysteries in the world around them. By exploring yokai as a concept, we can better understand broader processes of tradition, innovation, storytelling, and individual and communal creativity.

Pandemonium and Parade

Monsters known as yōkai have long haunted the Japanese cultural landscape.

Pandemonium and Parade

Monsters known as yōkai have long haunted the Japanese cultural landscape. This history of the strange and mysterious in Japan seeks out these creatures in folklore, encyclopedias, literature, art, science, games, manga, magazines and movies, exploring their meanings in the Japanese imagination over three centuries.

The Book of the Hakutaku

Ancient legend tells of an encyclopedia called The Book of the Hakutaku, which was given to the emperor by a magical beast. This book contained information about all the spirits, gods, and demons in the universe.

The Book of the Hakutaku


Ghost of the Bamboo Road

This book was partially inspired, also, by my curiosity about what happened to the villages along those older roads when a landslide caused the route to shift ... In Japan, it is said that every author has a yōkai (ghost) story to tell.

Ghost of the Bamboo Road

When a vengeful spirit terrorizes a mountain village, a ninja and a Jesuit must save the villagers from the phantom’s wrath. January 1566: En route to Edo, Master ninja Hiro Hattori and Portuguese Jesuit Father Mateo spend the night in a rural mountain village whose inhabitants live in terror of a legendary vengeful ghost. When the innkeeper's wife is murdered and Father Mateo’s housekeeper, Ana, is blamed for a crime she did not commit, Hiro and Father Mateo are forced to investigate and reveal the truth. But when another woman turns up murdered in the snow, the detectives must face the shocking truth that the vengeful yurei the villagers fear might be more than just a legend after all.

The Book of Yokai

Along with these dramatic arts, there developed a massive publishing industry that produced ukiyoe woodblock prints (the movie posters of their day) and printed thousands of relatively inexpensive books, many of which were filled with ...

The Book of Yokai

Monsters, ghosts, fantastic beings, and supernatural phenomena of all sorts haunt the folklore and popular culture of Japan. Broadly labeled yokai, these creatures come in infinite shapes and sizes, from tengu mountain goblins and kappa water spirits to shape-shifting foxes and long-tongued ceiling-lickers. Currently popular in anime, manga, film, and computer games, many yokai originated in local legends, folktales, and regional ghost stories. Drawing on years of research in Japan, Michael Dylan Foster unpacks the history and cultural context of yokai, tracing their roots, interpreting their meanings, and introducing people who have hunted them through the ages. In this delightful and accessible narrative, readers will explore the roles played by these mysterious beings within Japanese culture and will also learn of their abundance and variety through detailed entries, some with original illustrations, on more than fifty individual creatures. The Book of Yokai provides a lively excursion into Japanese folklore and its ever-expanding influence on global popular culture. It also invites readers to examine how people create, transmit, and collect folklore, and how they make sense of the mysteries in the world around them. By exploring yokai as a concept, we can better understand broader processes of tradition, innovation, storytelling, and individual and communal creativity.

Modern Church

... but as fine as anything in the cate way of making Moritz Yokai , the Hungarian poet , hisand the sources of peace are with him ... It is well to find Mr. Speirs denying a book by Mr. J. H. Muirhead on a kindred topic , that nature ...

Modern Church


Religion and Psychotherapy in Modern Japan

I owe the biographical information here mainly to Kikuchi, Yōkai gaku no so Inoue Enryo. On Chikazumi, see Iwata, ... Though this book was published in the middle of the hypnotism boom, Inoue did not mention hypnotism in it.

Religion and Psychotherapy in Modern Japan

Since the late nineteenth century, religious ideas and practices in Japan have become increasingly intertwined with those associated with mental health and healing. This relationship developed against the backdrop of a far broader, and deeply consequential meeting: between Japan’s long-standing, Chinese-influenced intellectual and institutional forms, and the politics, science, philosophy, and religion of the post-Enlightenment West. In striving to craft a modern society and culture that could exist on terms with – rather than be subsumed by – western power and influence, Japan became home to a religion--psy dialogue informed by pressing political priorities and rapidly shifting cultural concerns. This book provides a historically contextualized introduction to the dialogue between religion and psychotherapy in modern Japan. In doing so, it draws out connections between developments in medicine, government policy, Japanese religion and spirituality, social and cultural criticism, regional dynamics, and gender relations. The chapters all focus on the meeting and intermingling of religious with psychotherapeutic ideas and draw on a wide range of case studies including: how temple and shrine ‘cures’ of early modern Japan fared in the light of German neuropsychiatry; how Japanese Buddhist theories of mind, body, and self-cultivation negotiated with the findings of western medicine; how Buddhists, Christians, and other organizations and groups drew and redrew the lines between religious praxis and psychological healing; how major European therapies such as Freud’s fed into self-consciously Japanese analyses of and treatments for the ills of the age; and how distress, suffering, and individuality came to be reinterpreted across the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, from the southern islands of Okinawa to the devastated northern neighbourhoods of the Tohoku region after the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disasters of March 2011. Religion and Psychotherapy in Modern Japan will be welcomed by students and scholars working across a broad range of subjects, including Japanese culture and society, religious studies, psychology and psychotherapy, mental health, and international history.

Yurei Attack

The yurei are often lumped together with the yokai, which we cover in great detail in the predecessor to this book, Yokai Attack! The Japanese Monster Survival Guide. In a nutshell, yokai are the things that go bump in Japan's night: ...

Yurei Attack

Yurei Attack! is a nightmare-inducing one-stop guide to Japan's traditional ghosts and spirits. Surviving encounters with angry ghosts and sexy spectres. Haunted places. Dangerous games and how to play them. And more importantly, a guided tour of what awaits in the world of the dead. Yurei is the Japanese word for "ghost." It's as simple as that. They are the souls of dead people, unable—or unwilling—to shuffle off this mortal coil. Yurei are many things, but "friendly" isn't the first word that comes to mind. Not every yurei is dangerous, but they are all driven by emotions so uncontrollably powerful that they have taken on a life of their own: rage, sadness, devotion, a desire for revenge, or even the firm belief that they are still alive. This book, the third in the authors' bestselling Attack! series, after Yokai Attack! and Ninja Attack! gives detailed information on 39 of the creepiest yurei stalking Japan, along with detailed histories and defensive tactics should you have the misfortune to encounter one. Japanese ghosts include: Oiwa, The Horror of Yotsuya Otsuyu, The Tale of the Peony Lantern The Lady Rokujo, The Tale of Genji Isora, Tales of Moonlight and Rain Orui, The Depths of Kasane Book 3 of 3 in the Yokai Attack! series. Others include Ninja Attack! and Yokai Attack!.

The Encyclop dia Britannica

... about 30 79 ° 7 ' E. long ; The population was 79,842 in 1881 . miles from Yokai - ichi , its port , with which it commu- The municipal limits include , besides the city proper , nicates by light - draught steamers .

The Encyclop  dia Britannica


Chikamatsu

Shinkan kinshudan yokai (Kyoto University, Faculty of Letters Library), with a detailed Japanese commentary would have been available to Chikamatsu. The first two lines just quoted describe the ideal Daoist view of the recluse who wants ...

Chikamatsu

Chikamatsu Monzaemon (1653-1725), often referred to as "Japan's Shakespeare" and a "god of writers," was arguably the most famous playwright in Japanese history and wrote more than 100 plays for the kabuki and bunraku theaters. Today, the plays of this major literary figure are performed on kabuki and bunraku stages as well as in the modern theater, and forty-nine films of his plays have been made, thirty-one of them from the silent era. Translations of Chikamatsu's plays are available, but we have few examples of his late work, in which he increasingly incorporated stylistic elements of his shorter, contemporary dramas into his longer period pieces. Translator C. Andrew Gerstle argues that in these mature history plays, Chikamatsu depicted the tension between the private and public spheres of society by combining the rich character development of his contemporary pieces with the larger political themes of his period pieces. In this volume Gerstle translates five plays—four histories and one contemporary piece—never before available in English that complement other collections of Chikamatsu's work, revealing new dimensions to the work of this great Japanese playwright and artist.

Edo Kabuki in Transition

Yôkaigaku shinkö: yokai kara miru Nihonjin no kokoro. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1994. ... Kornicki, Peter F. The Book in Japan: A Cultural History from the Beginnings to the Nineteenth Century. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2OOO. —.

Edo Kabuki in Transition

Satoko Shimazaki revisits three centuries of kabuki theater, reframing it as a key player in the formation of an early modern urban identity in Edo Japan and exploring the process that resulted in its re-creation in Tokyo as a national theatrical tradition. Challenging the prevailing understanding of early modern kabuki as a subversive entertainment and a threat to shogunal authority, Shimazaki argues that kabuki instilled a sense of shared history in the inhabitants of Edo (present-day Tokyo) by invoking "worlds," or sekai, derived from earlier military tales, and overlaying them onto the present. She then analyzes the profound changes that took place in Edo kabuki toward the end of the early modern period, which witnessed the rise of a new type of character: the vengeful female ghost. Shimazaki's bold reinterpretation of the history of kabuki centers on the popular ghost play Tokaido Yotsuya kaidan (The Eastern Seaboard Highway Ghost Stories at Yotsuya, 1825) by Tsuruya Nanboku IV. Drawing not only on kabuki scripts but also on a wide range of other sources, from theatrical ephemera and popular fiction to medical and religious texts, she sheds light on the development of the ubiquitous trope of the vengeful female ghost and its illumination of new themes at a time when the samurai world was losing its relevance. She explores in detail the process by which nineteenth-century playwrights began dismantling the Edo tradition of "presenting the past" by abandoning their long-standing reliance on the sekai. She then reveals how, in the 1920s, a new generation of kabuki playwrights, critics, and scholars reinvented the form again, "textualizing" kabuki so that it could be pressed into service as a guarantor of national identity.

Yokai Calling

It was hard to believe those monstrous books were tsukumogami; he'd seen plenty growing up, but none quite so deranged. Lacotl's tsukumogami staff was the only suitable comparison. It was terrifying to think the yōkai Hidekazu summoned ...

Yokai Calling

A haunted empire. A wicked sorcerer on the rise. Three teenagers stand between a generation of peace and the creatures of myth seeking retribution for a dark past… In the shadow of the fallen Warlock Empire, twins Hidekazu and Masanori thrive on tales of their ancestors’ wyvern-slaying, of the wars preceding Seiryuu’s first era of peace in over a thousand years. But as the Dragon Goddess’ influence wanes, her greatest enemies return. The sorcerer who kidnaps women for a sinister purpose is only the first of many to arrive. The warrior arts previously forbidden to Hidekazu and Masanori won’t be enough to stop the wyverns, dragons, and mythical spirits rising in search of retribution. Nor will working with the future empress, their adopted sister, who steers Seiryuu's future from within the palace—and from the head of the battlefield. Their enemies seek justice not only for the crimes of the Goddess and the Warlock Empire, but also for the sins of Hidekazu and Masanori’s very own clan. Secrets run in their blood. Facing the tide of war means overcoming the Warlock Empire’s grim history… and the darkness within themselves. Jump into the world of Yumihari, a land filled with spirits, dragons, monsters, and stunning characters wielding elemental magic to save their homeland. If you love epic fight scenes, mystery and political intrigue, mythology, monsters, and mayhem, all with a touch of progression fantasy, you will love the 1500+ pages of adventure in the Yokai Calling series. Tap that buy button and experience the journey today! This omnibus edition includes the following books: Spirit of the Dragon (updated 3rd edition) The Dragon's Eye (updated 3rd edition) A Dragon's Sight Blood of Dragons

Yokai Stories

They American writer to make this book. don't teach lessons or morals. Most recognition of this yokai stories are a recognition of international mix, our own Yokai wonder. They delight in the weird. Stories neverwhere and They embrace ...

Yokai Stories

Bookworm Akira has read about the conniving ways of Yokai, but when he trips over one along a forest path, he decides to help the creature back to its murky water home. A challenge ensues involving Akira’s beloved grandmother, a pizza-producing hammer, and a crunchy cucumber. Haunting illustrations of the Yokai accompany 17 original stories.

Romance of the Imperial Capital Kotogami

“You can close the book now. ... Akari closed the book with a clap, and the young man's golden hair turned black once more. ... Since time immemorial, the yokai had been here, in every town and village, every river and tree.

Romance of the Imperial Capital Kotogami

A retro-modern romantic fantasy set in the age of the Kotogami! After a fearsome beast burns down her company lodgings, Akari finds herself homeless and out of a job. Luckily, the handsome yokai who rescued her from the beast offers her a job as a live-in custodian at a manor in the city. Needing a safe place to sleep, Akari accepts Tomohito’s offer but soon finds that living in a house full of eccentric Kotogami spirits isn’t exactly the sweet deal she was hoping for. With no alternative, Akari resigns herself to cohabiting with her idiosyncratic new roommates. And so begins the heartwarming tale of the trials, new friendships, and blossoming romance of a hard working young woman, living in an age where the Kotogami spirits walk among humans.

Exploring the Macabre Malevolent and Mysterious

In his book, The Book of <ǀNDL, Michael Dylan Foster asserts that \ǀNDL are a part of a structure he refers to as the 3\ǀNDL industrial complex, in which commercial producers draw on traditional ... 36 Foster, The Book of Yokai, 213.

Exploring the Macabre  Malevolent  and Mysterious

In this unique volume, a number of scholars spanning diverse areas and backgrounds offer fresh insight into how perceived concepts of horror and dark subject matter influence cultures and societies around the world. The contributions here explore how topics considered disturbing, mysterious, or fascinating are found not only in works of fiction and entertainment, but also in the cultural fabrics, belief systems, artistic creations, and even governmental structures of societies. Topics discussed in this book include witchcraft, voodoo, zombies, spiritualism, serial killers, monsters, cemeteries, pop culture entertainment, and the sublime in transcendental experiences. As the academic study of horror becomes more mainstream, collections such as this are instrumental in realizing just how much it impacts our lives—past, present, future, and imaginary. Thus, this volume of intriguing and profound topics offers scholars, students, and lovers of learning a much-needed fresh and innovative intellectual exploration of the horror genre and the cultural fascination with the mysterious unknown.

The Delightful Life of a Suicide Pilot

If you want to delve more deeply into the world of yokai, please visit the amazing yokai.com website. And for their belief in Dr. Siri over the years and their boundless enthusiasm, I should like to dedicate this book to the lovely ...

The Delightful Life of a Suicide Pilot

After 15 cunning, mischievous, heartbreaking, hilarious, eye-opening, and atmospheric installments, Colin Cotterill's award-winning Dr. Siri Paiboun series comes to a close. Make sure you don't miss this last chapter, a deliciously clever puzzle that illuminates the history of World War II in Southeast Asia. Laos, 1981: When an unofficial mailman drops off a strange bilingual diary, Dr. Siri is intrigued. Half is in Lao, but the other half is in Japanese, which no one Siri knows can read; it appears to have been written during the Second World War. Most mysterious of all, it comes with a note stapled to it: Dr. Siri, we need your help most urgently. But who is “we,” and why have they left no return address? To the chagrin of his wife and friends, who have to hear him read the diary out loud, Siri embarks on an investigation by examining the text. Though the journal was apparently written by a kamikaze pilot, it is surprisingly dull. Twenty pages in, no one has died, and the pilot never mentions any combat at all. Despite these shortcomings, Siri begins to obsess over the diary’s abrupt ending . . . and the riddle of why it found its way into his hands. Did the kamikaze pilot ever manage to get off the ground? To find out, he and Madame Daeng will have to hitch a ride south and uncover some of the darkest secrets of the Second World War.

Encyclopedia of Giants and Humanoids in Myth Legend and Folklore

In Japanese folklore the aobōzu (“blue priest”) is a yōkai (a creature of Japanese folklore) possibly created by the eighteenth century artist Toriyama Sekien in his book Gazu Hyakki Yakō; it was depicted as a one-eyed Buddhist priest ...

Encyclopedia of Giants and Humanoids in Myth  Legend and Folklore

Every culture has in its folklore and mythology beings of immense size and strength, as well as other preternatural humanoids great or small who walk among us, serving the divine or fulfilling their own agendas. This book catalogs the lore and legends of more than 1,000 different humanoid species and individual beings, including the Titans, Valkyries, Jotnar, yōkai, biblical giants, elves, ogres, trolls and many more.

Monster Anthropology

Foster, M. D. (2009), Pandemonium and Parade: Japanese Monsters and the Culture of Yōkai,Berkeley: University of California ... Foster, M. D. (2015), The Book of Yokai: Mysterious Creatures of Japanese Folklore,Oakland: University of ...

Monster Anthropology

Monsters are culturally meaningful across the world. Starting from this key premise, this book tackles monsters in the context of social change. Writing in a time of violent upheaval, when technological innovation brings forth new monsters while others perish as part of the widespread extinctions that signify the Anthropocene, contributors argue that putting monsters at the center of social analysis opens up new perspectives on change and social transformation. Through a series of ethnographically grounded analyses they capture monsters that herald, drive, experience, enjoy, and suffer the transformations of the worlds they beleaguer. Topics examined include the evil skulking new roads in Ancient Greece, terror in post-socialist Laos’s territorial cults, a horrific flying head that augurs catastrophe in the rain forest of Borneo, benign spirits that accompany people through the mist in Iceland, flesh-eating giants marching through neo-colonial central Australia, and ghosts lingering in Pacific villages in the aftermath of environmental disasters. By taking the proposition that monsters and the humans they haunt are intricately and intimately entangled seriously, this book offers unique, cross-cultural perspectives on how people perceive the world and their place within it. It also shows how these experiences of belonging are mediated by our relationships with the other-than-human.

Anthony Bourdain s Hungry Ghosts

Each is a tale of yūrei (ghosts), yokai (apparitions, spirits and demons) and/or reikon (inner beings residing ... In the 1904 introduction to his book it was written that never has there been such “an interpreter gifted with more ...

Anthony Bourdain s Hungry Ghosts

Hungry Ghosts is cooked up by the best selling author and veteran chef, Anthony Bourdain (Kitchen Confidential, Emmy-Award winning TV star of Parts Unknown) and acclaimed novelist Joel Rose (Kill, Kill, Faster, Faster) back again from their New York Times #1 best seller, Get Jiro!. Featuring real recipes cooked up by Bourdain himself, this horror anthology is sure to please--and scare! On a dark, haunted night, a Russian Oligarch dares a circle of international chefs to play the samurai game of 100 Candles--where each storyteller tells a terrifying tale of ghosts, demons and unspeakable beings--and prays to survive the challenge. Inspired by the Japanese Edo period game of Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai, Hungry Ghosts reimagines the classic stories of yokai, yorei, and obake, all tainted with the common thread of food. Including stellar artists Sebastian Cabrol, Vanesa Del Rey, Francesco Francavilla, Irene Koh, Leo Manco, Alberto Ponticelli, Paul Pope, and Mateus Santolouco as well as amazing color by Jose Villarrubia, a drop-dead cover by Paul Pope.