the boy with no name

Listen , she's guessed about us ... yes , she confronted me with it last night when I got home . No , I denied everything and she has no idea who you are or ...

the boy with no name


She Who Has No Name

He thought the woman had been lucky but, as he helped Lillith to her feet, she wailed, 'Leopold!' The boy was gone from her arms. 'No!' she shrieked.

She Who Has No Name

She has come from across the sea, cast from a land in its final throes of destruction. War and conflict have blighted the world, spreading to every far corner under the shadow of the demon king. On the continent of Amandia, the Order of Magicians, dwindling in strength and number, struggles to defend the Turian Empire from an overwhelming sea of foes. In their final hour of need, Samuel, Champion of the Order and Saviour of Cintar, is sent on a mission of the Empire's final hope, to slay the eternal witch-queen and return the kidnapped heir to the throne. But the Circle of Eyes has long laid plans for everyone, spread like a web across the world. Struggling with the loss of his magic, Samuel must rely on the unstoppable force of the Argum Stone, a relic from the time of the Ancients that threatens to destroy him with its every use. He must uncover the secrets of his own destiny if he is to control what lurks inside of him, marking him apart from all other magicians, except one.

The Boy With No Name

There lived a young boy with no name. All of his friends had no names. And his teacher had no name. His parents also had no names.

The Boy With No Name

Every one of us is searching for a name for ourselves. You have to have faith and follow your dreams, no matter how many people say it is not possible. When you come to a bridge you cannot cross, find another way. We all move to face our own giants. Remember to keep your faith, and victory will be yours. The “Boy with No Name” lives in a town with no name. One day, he stumbles across a book that takes him on a journey of a lifetime.

Family Matters

... a young girl who is the first person ever to seem to care about him. The boy has no name and no memories of anything except for crop picking.

Family Matters

Presents reviews of a variety of children's books featuring the themes of adoption and foster care.

Other Destinies

Because the boy does not speak their language , he has no identity to the Piegans , no name . “ And do you see , Loki , ” Cate Setman says , using Set's ...

Other Destinies

This first book-length critical analysis of the full range of novels written between 1854 and today by American Indian authors takes as its theme the search for self-discovery and cultural recovery. In his introduction, Louis Owens places the novels in context by considering their relationships to traditional American Indian oral literature as well as their differences from mainstream Euroamerican literature. In the following chapters he looks at the novels of John Rollin Ridge, Mourning Dove, John Joseph Mathews, D'Arcy McNickle, N. Scott Momaday, James Welch, Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, Michael Dorris, and Gerald Vizenor. These authors are mixedbloods who, in their writing, try to come to terms with the marginalization both of mixed-bloods and fullbloods and of their cultures in American society. Their novels are complex and sophisticated narratives of cultural survival - and survival guides for fullbloods and mixedbloods in modern America. Rejecting the stereotypes and cliches long attached to the word Indian, they appropriate and adapt the colonizers language, English, to describe the Indian experience. These novels embody the American Indian point of view; the non-Indian is required to assume the role of "other". In his analysis Owens draws on a broad range of literary theory: myth and folklore, structuralism, modernism, poststructuralism, and, particularly, postmodernism. At the same time he argues that although recent American Indian fiction incorporates a number of significant elements often identified with postmodern writing, it contradicts the primary impulse of postmodernism. That is, instead of celebrating fragmentation, ephemerality, and chaos, these authors insistupon a cultural center that is intact and recoverable, upon immutable values and ecological truths. Other Destinies provides a new critical approach to novels by American Indians. It also offers a comprehensive introduction to the novels, helping teachers bring this important fiction to the classroom.

Mongolian Literature Anthology

What man has no name? What woman has no children? What thing has no owner?' The boy said: 'The fire of a steel has no flame. The child in the womb has no ...

Mongolian Literature Anthology

First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Hollywood s Frontier Captives

Significantly, the boy has no name. (The issue of a man's name as a statement of cultural identity and affiliation will be of utmost importance in A Man ...

Hollywood s Frontier Captives

First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Boy Gautama

“This shape—this thing—has no name, my friends. You cannot call it anything because it has no name. If someone asked you what it was called, you would have ...

Boy Gautama

So have the stories long been told by those who delight in speaking of the Gracious One: That he is at this time a young man living and studying at the great palace built by his noble family outside the city of Kapilavastu, capital of the Sakya Republic, at the foot of the towering Himalaya to the cold north-stories long told that he was in all ways an exceptional child, then a gifted young man, but troubled by unwelcome demands of duty and dynasty, and puzzled, too, by a calling to a purpose he cannot yet name...

No Name For Refugees

“If we do it together, I won't be afraid and I will have a friend in hell,” the poor boy said. I told him I had no reason to say what did not happen.

No Name For Refugees

The story is narrated by a fifteen-year-old boy who flees from a brutal war in Africa with his parents and little sister and they settle in Australia as refugees. There, they encounter a type of life they are not expecting, and so their lives are turned upside-down. Quarrels and police intervention separate the parents, and the two kids are forced to stay with their mother. Without their father's usual supervision, they become delinquent and are enticed to become drug couriers until the police step in.

Silver

I had not barked nor begged for my prize. ... “He has no name,” Peel told the sea rat. ... “Blind Tom, who brought me the boy, never told me his name.

Silver

I am Silver, and there is no other pirate like me on these waters. This being the last testament of the infamous pirate Long John Silver, you would do well not to trust a word in its pages. Held captive aboard his own ship, the Linda Maria, he is to be taken to England, where he will hang at the king's pleasure. But he has another plan: to tell a tale of treason, murder, a lost treasure that would rival King George's own riches, and what really happened on Treasure Island . . . if Long John Silver is to be believed. But is he? His beginnings as a pickpocket on the streets of Bristol are as dark as the rest of his deliciously devious life. Taken to sea by the pirate captain Black John, Silver soon learns the arts of his trade: the sword, saber, and pistol. He makes his trade in plundering, cheating, ransacking, and murder---more murders than he can bother to count. British, Frenchmen, Spaniards, and Portuguese all fall before him. He takes exceptional pleasure in murder, but never such pleasure as he finds in his search for a most uncommon treasure. To find that treasure he must heed the words of a dead man, solve the ciphers in a well-worn Bible, forgo the love of an extraordinary woman, and climb over the corpses of friend and foe alike to arrive at Treasure Island and find his fortune. But Silver's tricks are never done. Before he greets the hangman at Newgate Square, he will have one last secret to reveal. Hidden in these pages are clues that lead to his remarkable discovery. And although King George's bounty for this notorious scourge may be handsome indeed, the captain who has captured Silver would not mind adding Silver's riches to his own purse. He will let Silver tell his tale in the hope of learning clues to the treasure's location. And if you were to mark his words as well, you might discover the whereabouts of that treasure yourself. So we shall, for now, allow Long John Silver to spin his stories, tales of adventure and betrayal, gold and jewels, love and murder. And he will never leave out the murder. Not Long John Silver.

Shadows in the Sun

And although not on equal footing, the two boys developed an uncanny bond of ... Dilip was surprised when he first learned that the boy had no name.

Shadows in the Sun

Twenty-one-year old Mayuri is afraid. For the second time, she has disgraced her husband and failed to give birth to a male heir. To make matters worse, this time she had twin girls. Her mother-in-law is outraged at her failure and takes action. Events escalate and Mayuri is forced to flee with her four year old daughter, Rajani who witnesses her mother’s plight from her hiding place. When her husband catches up to her, a deadly confrontation takes place which compels Mayuri to lie and reinvent her past. She faces unexpected challenges and adapts to a new religion and culture. When all her lies unravel, Mayuri pays a heavy price. But eventually, mother and daughter have to deal with the truth and its consequences. “Rukhsana Hasib’s beautifully written and passionate account of life in our world where so many cultures and religions are in conflict is like a brilliant ray of sunshine; it illuminates as it elevates. Above all, it is a reaffirmation of the beauty and courage of the human spirit.” - Professor Akbar Ahmend Ibu Khaldun chair of Islamic studies, American University, Washington, DC

Mapping Liminalities

Because the boy has no name and cannot be identified by a name that might be included in any taxonomy of the story's themes , actions or characters ...

Mapping Liminalities

The essays in this book offer new perspectives on the concept of liminality. They explore the relevance and significance of the limen or threshold from a variety of critical and theoretical perspectives, and across a broad range of historical periods. The authors all seek to revisit key questions raised in recent literary and cultural criticism, whilst also moving that discussion in new directions. In particular, the essays stress the importance of defining liminality for particular literary and cultural contexts, and highlight the fact that whilst it is liberating and progressive in some instances, in others it is violent and oppressive. Examining texts from the early modern to the postmodern periods, by authors on both sides of the Atlantic, the volume embraces a wide range of literary forms, including novels, travel narratives, religious texts, and philosophical treatises; it also includes consideration of non-literary forms of representation such as photography. This book reveals the complexity of the concept of liminality, and underscores its powerfulness and potential for understanding the ways in which both individuals and communities, in the past and in the present day, negotiate states of transition, and give expression to their experience of being 'in-between'.

No Name

My dad has not reported me as a missing person to the police. I heard him talking to his buddy Guy about me yesterday. Dad was sitting on the back porch and ...

No Name

Inspired by the traditional Choctaw story “No Name,” this modern adaptation features a present-day Choctaw teenager surviving tough family times––his mother leaving his mean-spirited father––with the help of a basketball coach, a Cherokee buddy, and a quiet new next-door girlfriend.

Spirits Dark and Light

How can I be proud of a son Who has No Name ? He put his hand on No Name's chest and shoved the boy , hard , sending him stumbling out the front door .

Spirits Dark and Light

Presents a collection of tales that focus on the the balance between the spirit world and the natural world.

The Disciples Call

Well, that our young hero has no name. ... lives no name . . . Secondly, we need to note that this is the story of a boy not a girl. Our hero is a boy.

The Disciples  Call

There is currently no shared language of vocation among Catholics in the developed, post-modern world of Europe and North America. The decline in practice of the faith and a weakened understanding of Church teaching has led to reduced numbers of people entering into marriage, religious life and priesthood. Uniquely, this book traces the development of vocation from scriptural, patristic roots through Thomism and the Reformation to engage with the modern vocational crisis. How are these two approaches compatible? The universal call to holiness is expressed in Lumen Gentium has been read by some as meaning that any vocational choice has the same value as any other such choice; is some sense of a higher calling part of the Catholic theology of vocation or not? Some claim that the single life is a vocation on a par with marriage and religious life; what kind of a theology of vocation leads to that conclusion? And is the secular use of the word 'vocation' to describe certain profession helpful or misleading in the context of Catholic theology?

Felix Wild

I shall not hesitate to punish anybody who disobeys any of my rulings. ... 'No name sir,' replies the Junior Clerk. 'The boy has no recorded name.

Felix Wild

Gosport, 1860. Felix Wild has lived on the streets and on his wits for all his young life. He’s been a mudlark at The Hard, eaten tallow when there was nothing else to be had, picked oakum in Forton Gaol, and acquired a skill for ‘tup-tup-tupping’ from the women of Haslar. He has no family, no idea of how old he might be, and has never heard of Christmas. But he has one remarkable talent: he can make a perfect drawing, from memory, of anything that he has seen. Saved from a further spell in prison by the wealthy William Kettle, Felix joins the Kettle household in East London and is employed to make drawings of the building of a magnificent new iron-clad vessel, HMS Warrior. His eagerness to learn new things knows no bounds: from working out how to use a knife and fork, and reading a dictionary from cover to cover, to being given the ‘tipsy key’ for the chronometers during his first voyage on board Warrior as she conducts sea-trials. While the men he meets are in awe of his drawing skills, the young women are absorbed in rather less cerebral matters, namely the fit of his fashionably tight ‘gas-pipe’ trousers and his distinctive looks - one eye is blue, the other green. Felix Wild is a captivating novel that has all the affectionate humour and vivid sense of place that has made Peter Broadbent’s naval memoirs so popular.

Becoming The Enchanter

“Your dishonor need not be very great—I am bringing up the boy as my son.” “What is the name of your son?” “He has no name yet.

Becoming The Enchanter

After the death of her fianc-, Lyn Webster Wilde sought refuge in alcohol, meaningless affairs and her high-powered job as a film-maker. But a chance encounter changed her life and, after fulfilling a series of tests, she was cautiously welcomed into a secret fraternity. She discovered that her new companions were the guardians of an ancient tradition of knowledge every bit as potent and life-transforming as that of the Native Americans or Siberian Shamans. It is a tradition that reaches back through the wisdom of the Celts to the megalith-builders of the Neolithic age and which continues to this day in the British isles. This is Lyn's extraordinary true account of her experiences and adventures on her way to unlocking life-altering magical secrets and ultimately 'becoming the enchanter'.

The Boy Who Said No

Both were a bit more relaxed as the forest had not produced any surprises so far. ... These people had no homes, no villages, no occupations, no names even, ...

The Boy Who Said No

The Boy Who Said No is first and foremost a story of people and their travails, the world in which they live, the colors and the sightsOCoa story of mystical and mythical India. The reader will encounter the baked hardness of the dry summer, the lovely, soft greenness of the monsoon, the menacing river in a raging storm that brings out the hero and the humor in a village, and the cruelly severe customs involved in owning and losing land. At the start, Babu announces his intention to organize the workers in the face of violence and of the old menOCOs, especially the old Chowdhary's, perorations. G.K. Rao, in his inspired book, manages to neither demonize the landowners nor idealize the workers and their cause. The Boy Who Said No is a short chapter in several lives, a once-upon-a-time tale of a community. For an author bio and photo, reviews, and a reading sample, visit bosonbooks.com."

Mythology for Storytellers Themes and Tales from Around the World

Meanwhile, the evil spirits had discovered this fact. Meeting in their barren, sunless home, ... He told his guests, “Up to this time this boy has no name.

Mythology for Storytellers  Themes and Tales from Around the World

Illustrated in full color throughout, this delightful collection puts the riches of world mythology at the fingertips of students and storytellers alike. It is a treaury of favorite and little-known tales from Africa, Asia, Europe, the Americas, Australia, and Oceania, gracefully retold and accompanied by fascinating, detailed information on their historic and cultural backgrounds. The introduction provides an informative overview of mythology, its purpose in world cultures, and myth in contemporary society and popular culture. Mythic themes are defined and the often-misunderstood difference between myth and legend explained. Following this, the main sections of the book are arranged thematically, covering The Creation, Death and Rebirth, Myths of Origins, Myths of the Gods, and Myths of Heroes. Each section begins by comparing its theme cross-culturally, explaining similarities and differences in the mthic narratives. Myths from diverse cultures are then presented, introduced, and retold in a highly readable fashion. A bibliography follows each retelling so readers can find more information on the culture, myth, and deities. Character, geographical, and general indexes round out this volume, and a master bibliography facilitates research. For students, storytellers, or anyone interested in the wealth of world mythology, Mythology: Stories and Themes from Around the World provides answers to common research questions, sources for myths, and stories that will delight, inform, and captivate.

Fathers Can Be Good Dads

Next day, when the girl woke up, she could not find the boy on the foot of the mountain. ... had no name, the girl could not call for her brother.

Fathers Can Be Good Dads