History of Universities

Recent works on the essential meaning of the British Empire have focused on ambiguities and fuzzy definitions.2 The search for a 'Britannic Vision', led by historians and politicians, had been around since the later nineteenth century.

History of Universities

Volume XXIX/1 of History of Universities contains the customary mix of learned articles and book reviews which makes this publication such an indispensable tool for the historian of higher education. The volume is, as always, a lively combination of original research and invaluable reference material.

The Great War and the British Empire

3; McIntyre, Dominion of New Zealand, p. 20; McIntyre, The Britannic Vision: Historians and the Making of the British Commonwealth of Nations, 1907–48 (New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), pp.

The Great War and the British Empire

In 1914 almost one quarter of the earth's surface was British. When the empire and its allies went to war in 1914 against the Central Powers, history's first global conflict was inevitable. It is the social and cultural reactions to that war and within those distant, often overlooked, societies which is the focus of this volume. From Singapore to Australia, Cyprus to Ireland, India to Iraq and around the rest of the British imperial world, further complexities and interlocking themes are addressed, offering new perspectives on imperial and colonial history and theory, as well as art, music, photography, propaganda, education, pacifism, gender, class, race and diplomacy at the end of the pax Britannica.

Clio s Battles

Re: Croatia, R. Yeomans, Visions of Annihilation: The Ustasha Regime and the Cultural Politics of Fascism, ... 43–50; W. D. McIntyre, The Britannic Vision: Historians and the Making of the British Commonwealth of Nations, ...

Clio s Battles

To write history is to consider how to explicate the past, to weigh the myriad possible approaches to the past, and to come to terms with how the past can be and has been used. In this book, prize-winning historian Jeremy Black considers both popular and academic approaches to the past. His focus is on the interaction between the presentation of the past and current circumstances, on how history is used to validate one view of the present or to discredit another, and on readings of the past that unite and those that divide. Black opens with an account that underscores the differences and developments in traditions of writing history from the ancient world to the present. Subsequent chapters take up more recent decades, notably the post-Cold War period, discussing how different perspectives can fuel discussions of the past by individuals interested in shaping public opinion or public perceptions of the past. Black then turns to the possible future uses of the then past as a way to gain perspective on how we use the past today. Clio's Battles is an ambitious account of the engagement with the past across world history and of the clash over the content and interpretation of history and its implications for the present and future.

Prophecies Miracles and Visions of St Columba Columcille

... wasted by dreadful pestilence ; except two races , that is to say , the people of the Picts , and that of the Scots ( Irish colonists ) of Britain , between whom the hills of the Britannic ridge ( Drum - Alban ) form a boundary .

Prophecies  Miracles and Visions of St Columba  Columcille


Visions of the Times of Old Or The Antiquarian Enthusiast

... appear an unfair arrangement , will gain the eye of some influential friend of the institution in question . ... name on the list of members at the next general meeting , as a Founder and Ordinary Fellow of the Britannic Section .

Visions of the Times of Old  Or The Antiquarian Enthusiast


Eccentric Visions

This meant that the Britannic typos lost much of his symbolic ascendancy in the power game. The Australian response to the change was not, however, quite what one might have expected. Whether it is a transition phenomenon or whether the ...

Eccentric Visions

What this book represents is, quite literally, a “slice” of (white) Australian life. By noting the patterns and parallels that emerge in a random sampling of social phenomena of widely varying types, from soap operas to political behaviour, Gaile McGregor has constructed a model that, in its challenge to uniformitarianism, is a test case in ethnographic theory. Using methods ranging from the hermeneutic through the structuralist to the psychoanalytic, McGregor deploys the self-evidence of communal life and language to establish not only that all cultural phenomena are “patterned,” but that this patterning is unique to and consistent across the entire system. Further, it not only influences but constrains the way the Australian conceptualizes, codifies and expresses his/her existential position. Hence the Australian predilection for icons of intermediacy: the verandah in architecture, the bush in literature, the beach in folk culture, the middle ground in landscape painting, the pub in everyday life. This identification with buffer zones between inside and outside not only mimics the Australian’s real bracketing between desert and ocean, but embodies his/her sense of disablement vis-à-vis both culture and nature, art and techne, super-ego and id, all of which are coded as feminine.

Bringing Culture Back In

McIntyre, W. D. The Britannic Vision. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, 2009. Miller, J. D. B. “The Commonwealth and World Order: the Zimmern Vision and After.” Journal of Impe‐rial and Commonwealth History 8 (1979-80): 159-74.

Bringing Culture Back In

Economists used to claim that material self-interest and the rational choices of the individual were universal factors that transcended cultural values and differences. This position has been challenged by critics, who have pointed out the methodological and philosophical weaknesses of this approach. They dispute the idea that social order can be explained as the product of the choices of individual agents, and that social agents operate independently of their social and cultural values and norms. Today, there is virtual agreement, not only among students of culture, but also among social scientists that "culture counts" in both politics and society as well as in international relations. In this book, a number of international political scientists, economists, philosophers and humanist scholars address the role of culture, ethnicity, and religion in contemporary states and societies.

The End of Empire in Uganda

Low, D. A., 'The Buganda Mission 1954', Historical Studies 13/51 (1968), 353–380 Low, D. A., Buganda in Modern History ... W. David, The Britannic Vision: Historians and the Making of the British Commonwealth of Nations (Basingstoke, ...

The End of Empire in Uganda

The negative legacy of the British empire is often thought of in terms of war and economic exploitation, while the positive contribution is associated with the establishment of good governance and effective, modern institutions. In this new analysis of the end of empire in Uganda, Spencer Mawby challenges these preconceptions by explaining the many difficulties which arose when the British attempted to impose western institutional models on Ugandan society. Ranging from international institutions, including the Commonwealth, to state organisations, like the parliament and army, and to civic institutions such as trade unions, the press and the Anglican church, Mawby uncovers a wealth of new material about the way in which the British sought to consolidate their influence in the years prior to independence. The book also investigates how Ugandans responded to institutional reform and innovation both before and after independence, and in doing so sheds new light on the emergence of the notorious military dictatorship of Idi Amin. By unpicking historical orthodoxies about 20th-century imperial history, this institutional history of the end of empire and the early years of independence offers an opportunity to think afresh about the nature of the colonial impact on Africa and the development of authoritarian rule on the continent.

The Emergence of International Society in the 1920s

McIntyre, W. David, The Britannic Vision: Historians ... I,” in Sebastian Conrad and Dominic Sachsenmaier, eds., Competing Visions of World Order: Global Moments and Movements, 1880s—193 05 (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), 97-1 17.

The Emergence of International Society in the 1920s

Chronicling the emergence of an international society in the 1920s, Daniel Gorman describes how the shock of the First World War gave rise to a broad array of overlapping initiatives in international cooperation. Though national rivalries continued to plague world politics, ordinary citizens and state officials found common causes in politics, religion, culture, and sport with peers beyond their borders. The League of Nations, the turn to a less centralized British Empire, the beginning of an international ecumenical movement, international sporting events, and audacious plans for the abolition of war all signaled internationalism's growth. State actors played an important role in these developments and were aided by international voluntary organizations, church groups, and international networks of academics, athletes, women, pacifists, and humanitarian activists. These international networks became the forerunners of international NGOs and global governance.

Visions of Empire

If a “Britannic identity” was one of the unifying marks of the empire, the Second World War saw Britishness reach a new peak and intensity of expression (Kumar 2003: 233–38; Mandler 2006: 187–95). It was a Britishness, seen as a shared ...

Visions of Empire

What the rulers of empire can teach us about navigating today's increasingly interconnected world The empires of the past were far-flung experiments in multinationalism and multiculturalism, and have much to teach us about navigating our own increasingly globalized and interconnected world. Until now, most recent scholarship on empires has focused on their subject peoples. Visions of Empire looks at their rulers, shedding critical new light on who they were, how they justified their empires, how they viewed themselves, and the styles of rule they adopted toward their subjects. Krishan Kumar provides panoramic and multifaceted portraits of five major European empires—Ottoman, Habsburg, Russian/Soviet, British, and French—showing how each, like ancient Rome, saw itself as the carrier of universal civilization to the rest of the world. Sometimes these aims were couched in religious terms, as with Islam for the Ottomans or Catholicism for the Habsburgs. Later, the imperial missions took more secular forms, as with British political traditions or the world communism of the Soviets. Visions of Empire offers new insights into the interactions between rulers and ruled, revealing how empire was as much a shared enterprise as a clash of oppositional interests. It explores how these empires differed from nation-states, particularly in how the ruling peoples of empires were forced to downplay or suppress their own national or ethnic identities in the interests of the long-term preservation of their rule. This compelling and in-depth book demonstrates how the rulers of empire, in their quest for a universal world order, left behind a legacy of multiculturalism and diversity that is uniquely relevant for us today.

Union and Empire

Any temptation to view the Anglo-Scottish Union as a triumph for the Britannic vision of James VI & I must consider the scale of representation accorded to Scotland in the House of Commons, which further underscored that a federative ...

Union and Empire

A major interpretation of the 1707 Act of Union and the making of the United Kingdom.

Flying Tiger

The Britannic Vision: Historians and the Making of the British Commonwealth ofNations, 1907–48. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. McKeown, Timothy. 2004. Case Studies and the Limits of the Quantitative World View.

Flying Tiger

In this book, Ulrich Krotz draws from two theoretical approaches--social constructivism and historical institutionalism--to reframe our understanding of how international relationships evolve. While other scholars have touched on these issues, until now no one has provided a sustained, finely-grained, and historically-informed analysis that explains how international relations inform domestic realities and how, in turn, domestic politics and institutions structure interstate relationships. Fully researched in French, German, and English, Krotz's account of how the Tiger Helicopter project was conceived and funded, and how the combat helicopter was built and exported, presents a clear analysis about the dialectical relationship between 'high' interstate politics and 'low' domestic politics, making a groundbreaking theoretical contribution to international relations scholarship.

New Zealand s France

A Different View of 1835–1935 Alistair Watts. McCarthy, H. 'Leading from the Centre: The ... The Britannic Vision: Historians and the Making of the British Commonwealth of Nations, 1907–48. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. ———.

New Zealand s France

In New Zealand’s France, Dr Alistair Watts investigates the origins of the New Zealand nation state from a fresh perspective — one that moves beyond the traditional bicultural view prevalent in the current New Zealand historiography. That New Zealand became British in the 1840s owes much, Dr Watts contends, to that other great colonial power of the time, France. The rich history of British antagonism towards the French was transported to New Zealand in the 1830s and 1840s as part of the British colonists’ cultural baggage, to be used in creating an old identity in a new land. Even as the British colonists sought a new beginning, this defining anti-French characteristic caused them to override the existing Māori culture with their own constructs of time and place. Leaving their signature names in the cities of Wellington and Nelson and naming their streets after Waterloo and Collingwood, the British colonisers attempted to establish a local antithesis of France through a bucolic Little Britain in the South Pacific. It was this legacy, as much as the assumed bicultural origins of modern New Zealand, that produced a Pacific country that still relies on the symbolism of the Union Jack embedded in the national flag and the totemic constitutional presence of the British Crown to maintain its national identity. This is the story of how this came about.

The Commonwealth and International Affairs

2 W. D. McIntyre, The Britannic Vision: Historians and the Making of the British Commonwealth of Nations, 1907–48 (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), p. 89. 3 J. Dove to R. H. Brand, 23 June 1933, Lothian Papers, Scottish Record Office, ...

The Commonwealth and International Affairs

&Quot;The Round Table" journal celebrates its centenary in 2010. The journal carried a number of articles recognised as highly influential in the making of British and Commonwealth policy, including constitutional reform in India, and the independence of southern Ireland. This book presents key articles published over one hundred years.

The Kashmir Conflict

Louis, Wm. Roger (edited), Penultimate Adventures with Britannia (New York: IB Tauris, 2008). ... McIntyre, David, The Britannic Vision: Historians and the Making of the British Commonwealth of Nations, 1907–48 (Basingstoke, ...

The Kashmir Conflict

This book presents a study of the international dimensions of the Kashmir dispute between India and Pakistan from before its outbreak in October 1947 until the Tashkent Summit in January 1966. By focusing on Kashmir’s under-researched transnational dimensions, it represents a different approach to this intractable territorial conflict. Concentrating on the global context(s) in which the dispute unfolded, it argues that the dispute’s evolution was determined by international concerns that existed from before and went beyond the Indian subcontinent. Based on new and diverse official and personal papers across four countries, the book foregrounds the Kashmir dispute in a twin setting of Decolonisation and the Cold War, and investigates the international understanding around it within the imperatives of these two processes. In doing so, it traces Kashmir’s journey from being a residual irritant of the British Indian Empire, to becoming a Commonwealth embarrassment and its eventual metamorphosis into a security concern in the Cold War climate(s). A princely state of exceptional geo-strategic location, complex religious composition and unique significance in the context of Indian and Pakistani notions of nation and statehood, Kashmir also complicated their relations with Britain, the United States, Soviet Union, China, the Commonwealth countries and the Afro-Arab-Asian world. This book is of interest to scholars in the field of Asian History, Cold War History, Decolonisation and South Asian Studies.

Exploring the Britannic

Everything seemed good with the world, when all of a sudden I froze dead in my tracks, startled by the vision of what appeared to be a face staring up at me from the harbour bottom. Lying on the seabed, with a casually discarded bottle ...

Exploring the Britannic

Launched in 1914, two years after the ill-fated voyage of her sister ship, RMS Titanic, the Britannic was intended to be superior to her tragic twin in every way. But war intervened and in 1915 she was requisitioned as a hospital ship. Just one year later, while on her way to collect troops wounded in the Balkans campaign, she fell victim to a mine laid by a German U-boat and tragically sank in the middle of the Aegean Sea. There her wreck lay, at a depth of 400 feet, until it was discovered 59 years later by legendary explorer Jacques Cousteau. In 1996 the wreck was bought by the author of this book, Simon Mills. Exploring the Britannic tells the complete story of this enigmatic ship: her construction, launch and life, her fateful last voyage, and the historical findings resulting from the exploration of the well-preserved wreck over a period of 40 years. With remarkable sonar scans and many never before seen photographs of the wreck, plus the original Harland & Wolff ship plans, not previously published in their entirety, Exploring the Britannic finally details how the mysteries surrounding the 100-year-old enigma were laid to rest, and what the future might also hold for her.

The Contemporary Commonwealth

——(2009) The Britannic Vision: Historians and the Making of the British Commonwealth of Nations, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Marshall, P.J. (ed.) (1996) Cambridge Illustrated History of the British Empire, Cambridge: Cambridge ...

The Contemporary Commonwealth

This collection of essays has been assembled to mark the centenary of The Round Table. It provides an analysis of the modern Commonwealth since the establishment of the Secretariat in 1965. Providing an overview of the contemporary Commonwealth, this book places the organization in its rich historical context while assessing its achievements, failures and prospects. The volume is divided into two parts: • Part I concentrates on a series of themes, dealing with the structure and functioning of the Commonwealth and its major activities, including the work of the secretary general and secretariat, its championing of the interests of small states, human rights and the world economy. • Part II adopts a regional perspective, identifying the impact of the Commonwealth on regional relations generally and particular problems that affect these relations. It also examines the ways in which the Commonwealth sometimes reinforces regional loyalties and interests but also the extent to which these have also reduced the importance of the Commonwealth in the foreign policy of its member states. The Contemporary Commonwealth will be of interest to students and scholars of international politics and international organisations, practitioners ,journalists and those working in NGOs involved in Commonwealth affairs. This collection of essays is intended as a companion volume to The Commonwealth and International Affairs, edited by Alex May, marking the centenary of The Round Table.

Liberal Ideals and the Politics of Decolonisation

McIntyre, The Britannic Vision, 19–62. 14. For more detail on Keith's life see Shinn Jr, Arthur Berriedale Keith 1879–1944. 15. I gratefully thank Dr Donal Coffey for bringing this collection to my attention.

Liberal Ideals and the Politics of Decolonisation

Liberal Ideals and the Politics of Decolonisation explores the subject of liberalism and its uses and contradictions across the late British Empire, especially in the context of imperial dissolution and subsequent state- building. The book covers multiple regions and issues concerning the British Empire and the Commonwealth, in particular the period ranging from the late-nineteenth century to the late- twentieth century. Original intellectual contributions are offered along with new arguments on critical issues in imperial history that will appeal to a wide range of scholars, including those outside of history. Liberal Ideals and the Politics of Decolonisation exposes commonalities, contradictions and contexts of different types of liberalism that animated the late British Empire and its rulers, radicals, subjects and citizens as they attempted to forge new states from its shadow and understand the impact of imperialism. This book examines the complexities of the idea and quest for self-government in the last stages of the British Empire. It also argues the importance of the political, intellectual and empirical aspects of liberalism to understand the process of decolonisation. The chapters in this book were originally published in a special issue of The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History.