The Building of Renaissance Florence

Patrons - The Guilds - Strozzi family - Succhielli family.

The Building of Renaissance Florence

Patrons - The Guilds - Strozzi family - Succhielli family.

The Economy of Renaissance Florence

" -- The Economist "This book marks a crowning achievement of a distinguished academic career, and it achieves both authority in its exposition and modesty in its tone.

The Economy of Renaissance Florence

Richard A. Goldthwaite, a leading economic historian of the Italian Renaissance, has spent his career studying the Florentine economy. In this magisterial work, Goldthwaite brings together a lifetime of research and insight on the subject, clarifying and explaining the complex workings of Florence's commercial, banking, and artisan sectors. Florence was one of the most industrialized cities in medieval Europe, thanks to its thriving textile industries. The importation of raw materials and the exportation of finished cloth necessitated the creation of commercial and banking practices that extended far beyond Florence's boundaries. Part I situates Florence within this wider international context and describes the commercial and banking networks through which the city's merchant-bankers operated. Part II focuses on the urban economy of Florence itself, including various industries, merchants, artisans, and investors. It also evaluates the role of government in the economy, the relationship of the urban economy to the region, and the distribution of wealth throughout the society. While political, social, and cultural histories of Florence abound, none focuses solely on the economic history of the city. The Economy of Renaissance Florence offers both a systematic description of the city's major economic activities and a comprehensive overview of its economic development from the late Middle Ages through the Renaissance to 1600. -- Brian Maxson

Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence

1700 , 27 December 1430 ; R. A. Goldthwaite , The Building of Renaissance Florence ( Baltimore , 1980 ) , pp . 272-86 ; M. Haines , “ Artisan Family Strategies : Proposals for Research on the Families of Florentine Artists , " in Art ...

Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence

Essays illustrate the ways Renaissance Florentines expressed or shaped their identities as they interacted with their society.

Dressing Renaissance Florence

See Richard A. Goldthwaite , The Building of Renaissance Florence ( Baltimore , 1980 ) and “ The Florentine Palace as Domestic Architecture , ” American Historical Review 77 ( June - Dec . 1972 ) : 977–1012 , which shifted the focus of ...

Dressing Renaissance Florence

As portraits, private diaries, and estate inventories make clear, elite families of the Italian Renaissance were obsessed with fashion, investing as much as forty percent of their fortunes on clothing. In fact, the most elaborate outfits of the period could cost more than a good-sized farm out in the Mugello. Yet despite its prominence in both daily life and the economy, clothing has been largely overlooked in the rich historiography of Renaissance Italy. In Dressing Renaissance Florence, however, Carole Collier Frick provides the first in-depth study of the Renaissance fashion industry, focusing on Florence, a city founded on cloth, a city of wool manufacturers, finishers, and merchants, of silk dyers, brocade weavers, pearl dealers, and goldsmiths. From the artisans who designed and assembled the outfits to the families who amassed fabulous wardrobes, Frick's wide-ranging and innovative interdisciplinary history explores the social and political implications of clothing in Renaissance Italy's most style-conscious city. Frick begins with a detailed account of the industry itself -- its organization within the guild structure of the city, the specialized work done by male and female workers of differing social status, the materials used and their sources, and the garments and accessories produced. She then shows how the driving force behind the growth of the industry was the elite families of Florence, who, in order to maintain their social standing and family honor, made continuous purchases of clothing -- whether for everyday use or special occasions -- for their families and households. And she concludes with an analysis of the clothes themselves: what pieces made up an outfit; how outfits differed for men, women, and children; and what colors, fabrics, and design elements were popular. Further, and perhaps more basically, she asks how we know what we know about Renaissance fashion and looks to both Florence's sumptuary laws, which defined what could be worn on the streets, and the depiction of contemporary clothing in Florentine art for the answer. For Florence's elite, appearance and display were intimately bound up with self-identity. Dressing Renaissance Florence enables us to better understand the social and cultural milieu of Renaissance Italy.

Renaissance Florence Updated Edition

Bibliographical Supplement The Historiography of Renaissance Florence since 1969 CHAPTER I : THE RENAISSANCE CITY e A recent important contribution to the history of Florentine urbanism is R. Goldthwaite , The Building of Renaissance ...

Renaissance Florence  Updated Edition

In the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, the city of Florence experienced the most creative period in her entire history. This book is an in-depth analysis of that dynamic community, focusing primarily on the years 1380-1450 in an examination of the city's physical character, its economic and social structure and developments, its political and religious life, and its cultural achievement. For this edition, Mr. Brucker has added Notes on Florentine Scholarship and a Bibliographical Supplement.

Renaissance Florence

An examination of the social history of Florence from the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries.

Renaissance Florence

An examination of the social history of Florence from the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries.

Building the Italian Renaissance

This dome would be the largest ever built. This is foremost a technical challenge but it is also a philosophical one. The project takes place at an important time for Florence.

Building the Italian Renaissance

Building the Italian Renaissance focuses on the competition to select a team to execute the final architectural challenge of the cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore--the erection of its dome. Although the model for the dome was widely known, the question of how this was to be accomplished was the great challenge of the age. This dome would be the largest ever built. This is foremost a technical challenge but it is also a philosophical one. The project takes place at an important time for Florence. The city is transitioning from a High Medieval world view into the new dynamics and ideas and will lead to the full flowering of what we know as the Renaissance. Thus the competition at the heart of this game plays out against the background of new ideas about citizenship, aesthetics, history (and its application to the present), and new technology. The central challenge is to expose players to complex and multifaceted situations and to individuals that animated life in Florence in the early 1400s. Humanism as a guiding philosophy is taking root and scholars are looking for ways to link the mercantile city to the glories of Rome and to the wisdom of the ancients across many fields. The aesthetics of the classical world (buildings, plastic arts and intellectual pursuits) inspired wonder, perhaps even envy, but the new approaches to the past by scholars such as Petrarch suggested that perhaps the creative classes are not simply crafts people, but men of ideas. Three teams compete for the honor to construct the dome, a project overseen by the Arte Della Lana (wool workers guild) and judged by them and a group of Florentine citizens who are merchants, aristocrats, learned men, and laborers. Their goal is to make the case for the building to live up to the ideals of Florence. The game gives students a chance to enter into the world of Florence in the early 1400s to develop an understanding of the challenges and complexity of such a major artistic and technical undertaking while providing an opportunity to grasp the interdisciplinary nature of major public works.

Ritual Brotherhood in Renaissance Florence

Florentine wealth derived in large measure from international banking and the manufacture and export of textiles, ... Concerning the Florentine economy, see Richard A. Goldthwaite, The Building of Renaissance Florence (Baltimore: Johns ...

Ritual Brotherhood in Renaissance Florence

Ritual Brotherhood in Renaissance Florence investigates the meaning of fraternity in terms of the ritual relations created in religious brotherhoods or confraternities during that period. The book focuses on the sociability of the confraternity as revealed in the patterns of membership and in forms of ceremony. Florence's confraternities serve as a vehicle for examining the relationship between ritual behavior and social organization. The text discusses the ways in which Florentines use forms of ritual to define, protect, and alter their relations with one another. The book reviews the social relations in Renaissance Florence through the structure of social relations, the politics of amity or enmity, and social relations in relation to economic exchange. Social organization and ritual actions include confraternal organization, membership, symbolic fraternity, and the rites of community. The book explores the company of San Paolo in the fifteenth century where the confraternity offers an introduction to the nature of citywide community, its republican institutions, and its civic values. The book also examines traditional confraternities in crisis, the nature of the disruptions that leads to the emergence of new confraternal organizations and values. In the sixteenth-century, confraternities reveal major departures in ideology, ritual, and social organization. They have also introduced the principles of hierarchy into confraternal membership, as well as a new ethic of obedience. The book will prove delightful reading for sociologists, historians studying Florentine society, and researchers interested in the history of religious brotherhood and confraternities.

Brunelleschi s Basilica

Brunelleschi’s basilica of Santo Spirito in Florence was not only a product of creative genius, but also of communal bureaucracy, socio-economic traditions, human and financial resources, factionalism, and rivalry.

Brunelleschi   s Basilica

Brunelleschi’s basilica of Santo Spirito in Florence was not only a product of creative genius, but also of communal bureaucracy, socio-economic traditions, human and financial resources, factionalism, and rivalry. This complex network of forces behind the monument serves as testimony to the determination and capacity of Renaissance Florentines to actualize the creative ideas of the extraordinary artists and architects who were transforming the profile of the city. Moreover, it reveals that the labor, spirit, and energy of those human beings who were building Renaissance Florence were just as important to its manufacture as the brick, stone and wood used to build it. By investigating those aspects that defined the building tradition of the Renaissance – the architect, the Opera (building committee), the quartiere (neighborhood), the cantiere (worksite and workforce) – we discover that behind a great monument lies a monumental account of collective human achievement.

Charity and Children in Renaissance Florence

Richard Goldthwaite , The Building of Renaissance Florence ( Baltimore , 1980 ) : 295ff . , 436–39 . 27. Gino Corti and J. G. da Silva , “ Note sur la production de la soie à Florence au XVe siècle , ” Annales : Economie , Société ...

Charity and Children in Renaissance Florence

A study in the ideology of wealth and poverty

The Renaissance Palace in Florence

Forster, K.W., 'The Palazzo Rucellai and Questions of Typology in the Development of Renaissance Buildings', Art Bulletin, 58 (1976): pp. 109–13. Fortini Brown, P., Private Lives in Renaissance Venice: Art, Architecture and the Family.

The Renaissance Palace in Florence

This book provides a reassessment of the theory of magnificence in light of the related social virtue of splendour. Author James Lindow highlights how magnificence, when applied to private palaces, extended beyond the exterior to include the interior as a series of splendid spaces where virtuous expenditure could and should be displayed. Examining the fifteenth-century Florentine palazzo from a new perspective, Lindow's groundbreaking study considers these buildings comprehensively as complete entities, from the exterior through to the interior. This book highlights the ways in which classical theory and Renaissance practice intersected in quattrocento Florence. Using unpublished inventories, private documents and surviving domestic objects, The Renaissance Palace in Florence offers a more nuanced understanding of the early modern urban palace.

Friendship Love and Trust in Renaissance Florence

Felix Gilbert , “ The Medici Megalopolis , " Review of Richard Goldthwaite , The Building of Renaissance Florence ( Baltimore , 1980 ) , in The New York Review of Books ( January 21 , 1982 ) : 62–66 . 13.

Friendship  Love  and Trust in Renaissance Florence

Kent explores the meaning of love and friendship as they were represented in the fifteenth century, particularly the relationship between heavenly and human friendship.

In Renaissance Florence with Leonardo

Recreates the people, places, events, and popular culture of Renaissance Florence in the time of Leonardo.

In Renaissance Florence with Leonardo

Recreates the people, places, events, and popular culture of Renaissance Florence in the time of Leonardo.

Renaissance Florence

The renowned scholar A. Richard Turner presents this popular art in a remarkably fresh and concise manner. In writing both erudite and spirited, he takes readers on a chronological and thematic tour of this extraordinary time and place.

Renaissance Florence

The Renaissance was one of the greatest and most glorious periods in all art, and Florence was its center. From Botticelli to Michelangelo, from superb painting, goldwork, and sculpture to dazzling churches and palaces, no city has achieved greater splendor or produced more brilliant art. The renowned scholar A. Richard Turner presents this popular art in a remarkably fresh and concise manner. In writing both erudite and spirited, he takes readers on a chronological and thematic tour of this extraordinary time and place. Unlike most books on Florence, this one provides a richly detailed context for the making of art, its display, and its meaning.

The Culture of Building

Richard Goldthwaite, “The Florentine palace as domestic architecture,” American Historical Review 77 (1972): 977–1012. 17. Maffei, La Casa Fiorentina. 18. Goldthwaite, The Building of Renaissance Florence, 13–14, 19. 19. Ibid, 399. 20.

The Culture of Building

The Culture of Building describes how the built world, including the vast number of buildings that are the settings for peoples everyday lives, is the product of building cultures--complex systems of people, relationships, building types, techniques, and habits in which design and building are anchored. These cultures include builders, bankers, architects, developers, clients, contractors, craftspeople, building inspectors, planners, and many others. The product of these cultures, which operate building after building, is the built world of cities and settlements. In this book, Howard Davis uses historical, contemporary, and cross-cultural examples to describe the nature and influence of these cultures. He shows how building cultures reflect the general cultures in which they exist, how they have changed over history, how they affect the form of buildings and cities, and how present building cultures, which are responsible for the contemporary everyday environments, may be improved. Following the development of the idea of building cultures using several historical examples, the book lays out a framework that puts such topics as craft and professionalism, the vernacular and nonvernacular, and design and construction in common frameworks. Although the book ranges widely over different cultures and historical periods, it emphasizes the transformations that took place in architecture and building practice from the late eighteenth century to the present. Finally, the book uses a series of contemporary examples that demonstrate the building culture as a living concept. These examples, which include built work as well as innovative processes that go beyond the work of architects alone, are described as the seeds that can help the emergence of a better build world. This beautiful book features over 260 color and black-and-white illustrations, most from the authors extensive collection of slides, and includes photographs, prints, and drawings from historical archives and contemporary architectural offices.

Nuns and Nunneries in Renaissance Florence

Giuliani, Innocenzo. ''Genesi e primo secolo di vita del magistrato sopra monasteri: Venezia, 1519–1620.'' Le venezianefrancescane 28 (1961): 42–68, 106–69. Goldthwaite, Richard A. The Building of Renaissance Florence: An Economic and ...

Nuns and Nunneries in Renaissance Florence

An analysis of Renaissance Florentine convents and their influence on the city’s social, economic, and political history. The 15th century was a time of dramatic and decisive change for nuns and nunneries in Florence. That century saw the city’s convents evolve from small, semiautonomous communities to large civic institutions. By 1552, roughly one in eight Florentine women lived in a religious community. Historian Sharon T. Strocchia analyzes this stunning growth of female monasticism, revealing the important roles these women and institutions played in the social, economic, and political history of Renaissance Florence. It became common practice during this time for unmarried women in elite society to enter convents. This unprecedented concentration of highly educated and well-connected women transformed convents into sites of great patronage and social and political influence. As their economic influence also grew, convents found new ways of supporting themselves; they established schools, produced manuscripts, and manufactured textiles. Using previously untapped archival materials, Strocchia shows how convents shaped one of the principal cities of Renaissance Europe. She demonstrates the importance of nuns and nunneries to the booming Florentine textile industry and shows the contributions that ordinary nuns made to Florentine life in their roles as scribes, stewards, artisans, teachers, and community leaders. In doing so, Strocchia argues that the ideals and institutions that defined Florence were influenced in great part by the city’s powerful female monastics. Winner, Helen and Howard R. Marraro Prize, American Catholic Historical Association “Strocchia examines the complex interrelationships between Florentine nuns and the laity, the secular government, and the religious hierarchy. The author skillfully analyzes extensive archival and printed sources.” —Choice

Making and Marketing Medicine in Renaissance Florence

La farmacia de Santa Maria Novella (Florence:Becocci Editore, 1987). A. Giuffrida, 'La bottega ... R.A. Goldthwaite, The Building of Renaissance Florence: An Economic and Social History (Baltimore:Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980).

Making and Marketing Medicine in Renaissance Florence

A study of the Speziale al Giglio apothecary shop in fifteenth-century Florence, Italy.