The Cambridge History of Classical Literature Volume 1 Greek Literature Part 3 Philosophy History and Oratory

This volume ranges in time over a very long period and covers the Greeks' most original contributions to intellectual history. It begins and ends with philosophy, but it also includes major sections on historiography and oratory.

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature  Volume 1  Greek Literature  Part 3  Philosophy  History and Oratory

This volume ranges in time over a very long period and covers the Greeks' most original contributions to intellectual history. It begins and ends with philosophy, but it also includes major sections on historiography and oratory. Although each of these areas had functions which in the modern world would not be considered 'Literary', the ancients made a less sharp distinction between intellectual and artistic production, and the authors included in this volume are some of Europe's most powerful stylists: Plato, Herodotus, Thucydides and Demosthenes.

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature Volume 1 Greek Literature Part 3 Philosophy History and Oratory

After its success in hardcover, this volume is now being issued in four paperback parts, providing individual texts on early Greek poetry, Greek drama, philosophy, history and oratory, and on the literature of the Hellenistic period and the ...

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature  Volume 1  Greek Literature  Part 3  Philosophy  History and Oratory

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Volume 1 offers a comprehensive survey of Greek literature from Homer to end of the period of stable Graeco-Roman civilation in the third century A.D. It embodies the advances made by recent classical scholarship and pays particular attention to texts that have become known in modern times. After its success in hardcover, this volume is now being issued in four paperback parts, providing individual texts on early Greek poetry, Greek drama, philosophy, history and oratory, and on the literature of the Hellenistic period and the Empire. A chapter on books and readers in the Greek world concludes Part 4. Each part has its own appendix of authors and works, a list of works cited, and an index.

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature Volume 1 Greek Literature Part 2 Greek Drama

CLASSICAL LITERATURE VOLUME I : GREEK LITERATURE PART I Early Greek Poetry PART 2 Greek Drama PART 3 Philosophy , History and Oratory PART 4 The Hellenistic Period and the Empire THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF CLASSICAL LITERATURE VOLUME I ...

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature  Volume 1  Greek Literature  Part 2  Greek Drama

This series provides individual textbooks on early Greek poetry, on Greek drama, and on the literature of the Hellenistic period and of the Empire.

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature Volume 1 Greek Literature Part 4 The Hellenistic Period and the Empire

CLASSICAL LITERATURE VOLUME I : GREEK LITERATURE PART I Early Greek Poetry PART 2 Greek Drama PART 3 Philosophy , History and Oratory PART 4 The Hellenistic Period and the Empire THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF CLASSICAL LITERATURE VOLUME I ...

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature  Volume 1  Greek Literature  Part 4  The Hellenistic Period and the Empire

Studies the revolutionary movement represented by some Hellenistic poets and those authors surviving from the imperial period.

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF CLASSICAL LITERATURE VOLUME I : GREEK LITERATURE PART I Early Greek Poetry PART 2 Greek Drama PART 3 Philosophy , History and Oratory PART 4 The Hellenistic Period and the Empire THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ...

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Volume 1 offers a comprehensive survey of Greek literature from Homer to end of the period of stable Graeco-Roman civilation in the third century A.D. It embodies the advances made by recent classical scholarship and pays particular attention to texts that have become known in modern times. After its success in hardcover, this volume is now being issued in four paperback parts, providing individual texts on early Greek poetry, Greek drama, philosophy, history and oratory, and on the literature of the Hellenistic period and the Empire. A chapter on books and readers in the Greek world concludes Part 4. Each part has its own appendix of authors and works, a list of works cited, and an index.

Beyond Alexandria

Literary Theory: An Introduction. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing. Easterling, P. and B. Knox (1989). The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Volume 1. Greek Literature, Part 3. Philosophy, History and Oratory.

Beyond Alexandria

Beyond Alexandria aims to provide a better understanding of Seleucid literature, covering the period from Seleucus I to Antiochus III. Despite the historical importance of the Seleucid Empire during the long third century BCE, little attention has been devoted to its literature. The works of authors affiliated with the Seleucid court have tended to be overshadowed by works coming out of Alexandria, emerging from the court of the Ptolemies, the main rivals of the Seleucids. This book makes two key points, both of which challenge the idea that "Alexandrian" literature is coterminous with Hellenistic literature as a whole. First, the book sets out to demonstrate that a distinctly strand of writing emerged from the Seleucid court, characterized by shared perspectives and thematic concerns. Second, Beyond Alexandria explores how Seleucid literature was significant on the wider Hellenistic stage. Specifically, it shows that the works of Seleucid authors influenced and provided counterpoints to writers based in Alexandria, including key figures such as Eratosthenes and Callimachus. For this reason, the literature of the Seleucids is not only interesting in its own right; it also provides an important entry point for furthering our understanding of Hellenistic literature in general.

Aristotle on Teleology

Science and Philosophy in Classical Greece, pp. ... Ancient Greek concepts of causation in comparativist perspective. ... In The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, vol. 1, part 3:Philosophy, history, and oratory. Cambridge.

Aristotle on Teleology

Monte Johnson examines one of the most controversial aspects of Aristiotle's natural philosophy: his teleology. Is teleology about causation or explanation? Does it exclude or obviate mechanism, determinism, or materialism? Is it focused on the good of individual organisms, or is god or man the ultimate end of all processes and entities? Is teleology restricted to living things, or does it apply to the cosmos as a whole? Does it identify objectively existent causes in the world, or is it merely a heuristic for our understanding of other causal processes? Johnson argues that Aristotle's aporetic approach drives a middle course between these traditional oppositions, and avoids the dilemma, frequently urged against teleology, between backwards causation and anthropomorphism. Although these issues have been debated with extraordinary depth by Aristotle scholars, and touched upon by many in the wider philosophical and scientific community as well, there has been no comprehensive historical treatment of the issue. Aristotle is commonly considered the inventor of teleology, although the precise term originated in the eighteenth century. But if teleology means the use of ends and goals in natural science, then Aristotle was rather a critical innovator of teleological explanation. Teleological notions were widespread among his predecessors, but Aristotle rejected their conception of extrinsic causes such as mind or god as the primary causes for natural things. Aristotle's radical alternative was to assert nature itself as an internal principle of change and an end, and his teleological explanations focus on the intrinsic ends of natural substances - those ends that benefit the natural thing itself. Aristotle's use of ends was subsequently conflated with incompatible 'teleological' notions, including proofs for the existence of a providential or designer god, vitalism and animism, opposition to mechanism and non-teleological causation, and anthropocentrism. Johnson addresses these misconceptions through an elaboration of Aristotle's methodological statements, as well as an examination of the explanations actually offered in the scientific works.

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature pt 1 Early greek poetry

Library , UC Santa Cruz 1998 Published by the Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge The Pitt Building , Trumpington ... Vol . 1 ( Greek literature ) , Pt 3 , Philosophy , history and oratory . 1. Classical literature , to c .

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature  pt  1  Early greek poetry


The Legacy of Isocrates and a Platonic Alternative

Political Philosophy and the Value of Education James R. Muir ... Kennedy, G.A. (1963) The Art of Persuasion in Greece. ... The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Vol. 1, Part 3. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

The Legacy of Isocrates and a Platonic Alternative

Bringing together the history of educational philosophy, political philosophy, and rhetoric, this book examines the influence of the philosopher Isocrates on educational thought and the history of education. Unifying philosophical and historical arguments, Muir discusses the role of Isocrates in raising two central questions: What is the value of education? By what methods ought the value of education to be determined? Tracing the historical influence of Isocrates’ ideas of the nature and value of education from Antiquity to the modern era, Muir questions normative assumptions about the foundations of education and considers the future status of education as an academic discipline.

JACT Review

that the Phoenicians would have preserved any accurate history about CUP , 1995 ; £ 13.95 ( pbk ) ; 0 521 49763 9 the event , which must have been fairly ... but it does not the Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics Imperial Library .

JACT Review


Ctesias Persian History Introduction text and translation

1989: The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Vol. I part 3: Philosophy, History and Oratory, Cambridge [paperback edition]. Eck, B. 1990: ›Surlaviede Ctésias‹, REG 103, pp. 404–434. Edelman, D. 2005: The Origins of the ›Second ...

Ctesias  Persian History  Introduction  text  and translation


Why History

In any case, his work evinces Greek literary influences as well as Roman civic pride by beginning the story at Rome's mythic point of Romulan origin. ... The Cambridge History of Classical Literature, Vol. 1, Part 3: Philosophy.

Why History

What is the point of history? Why has the study of the past been so important for so long? Why History? A History contemplates two and a half thousand years of historianship to establish how very different thinkers in diverse contexts have conceived their activities, and to illustrate the purposes that their historical investigations have served. Whether considering Herodotus, medieval religious exegesis, or twentieth-century cultural history, at the core of this work is the way that the present has been conceived to relate to the past. Alongside many changes in technique and philosophy, Donald Bloxham's book reveals striking long-term continuities in justifications for the discipline.

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature Volume 2 Latin Literature Part 1 The Early Republic

I. GREEK AND ROMAN LITERARY CULTURE Graecia capta ferum uictorem cepit ' captive Greece led her rough conqueror captive ' ( Hor . Epist . 2.1.156 ) . The history of Roman literature effectively begins with Ennius .

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature  Volume 2  Latin Literature  Part 1  The Early Republic

This volume analyses the process of creative adaptation which shaped the beginnings of Latin literature.

Beasts that Teach Birds that Tell Animal Language in Rabbinic and Classical Literatures

3:5-6." ...they have gone so far astray as not to perceive that they are hostile to that power which of all the faculties ... History of Classical Literature, ed. P. E. Easterling and Bernard Knox, vol. 1. Greek Literature (Cambridge: ...

Beasts that Teach  Birds that Tell  Animal Language in Rabbinic and Classical Literatures

A study of rabbinic texts about talking animals, examined in the context of Greek and Roman cultures.

Books in Print

Books in Print


The Cambridge History of Classical Literature Volume 2 Latin Literature

1. GREEK AND ROMAN LITERARY CULTURE Graecia capta ferum uictorem cepit captive Greece led her rough conqueror captive ' ( Hor . Epist . 2.1.156 ) . The history of Roman literature effectively begins with Ennius .

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature  Volume 2  Latin Literature

This book provides a comprehensive, critical survey of the literature of Greece and Rome from Homer till the Fall of Rome. The literature is presented throughout in the context of the culture and the social and hisotircal processes of which it is an integral part.

Studies in Classical History and Society

Meyer Reinhold, Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies Meyer Reinhold. ger, Paideia vol. 1, p. 477, n. 56; Josef-Hans Kuhn, ... On human nature in the thought of the Sophists see, e.g., Beardslee, Fifth Century Greek Literature, pp.

Studies in Classical History and Society

Professor Reinhold, a distinguished senior classicist, has produced a fascinating and accessible collection of essays devoted to the study of ancient history. Among the articles included are "The Generation Gap," a major survey exploring myths of the uprising of one generation against another; "Augustus' Conception of Himself," a detailed summary and interpretation of Augustus' life and career; and "The Declaration of War against Cleopatra," an investigation of the charge against Cleopatra that she betrayed her pledge to Rome as a client ruler. Taken together, these essays form a unified and coherent survey of ancient history that will appeal to a broad audience.

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature

dared to breathe in a public speech ( Civ . Dei 2.30 ) . Cotta in the De natura deorum is a pontiff who adheres scrupulously in public to the traditional cults but is largely sceptical about them in private ( 1.61 ) - like some ...

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature

Cambridge Ha of classical literature.-v.2.2

Tragic Epic Or Epic Tragedy

Cambridge University Press . Hunter , R. ( 1988 ) . ... “ Herodotus , ” in The Cambridge History of Classical Literature , Vol . 1 , Part 3 : Philosophy , History and Oratory . P. E. Easterling and B. M. W. Knox ( eds . ) .

Tragic Epic Or Epic Tragedy