The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United ...

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West

Monasticism, in all of its variations, was a feature of almost every landscape in the medieval West. So ubiquitous were religious women and men throughout the Middle Ages that all medievalists encounter monasticism in their intellectual worlds. While there is enormous interest in medieval monasticism among Anglophone scholars, language is often a barrier to accessing some of the most important and groundbreaking research emerging from Europe. The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West offers a comprehensive treatment of medieval monasticism, from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, cover a range of topics and themes and represent the most up-to-date discoveries on this topic.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West Volume 2

The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United ...

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West  Volume 2

Monasticism, in all of its variations, was a feature of almost every landscape in the medieval West. So ubiquitous were religious women and men throughout the Middle Ages that all medievalists encounter monasticism in their intellectual worlds. While there is enormous interest in medieval monasticism among Anglophone scholars, language is often a barrier to accessing some of the most important and groundbreaking research emerging from Europe. Volume 2 of The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West offers a comprehensive treatment of medieval monasticism, from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, cover a range of topics and themes and represent the most up-to-date discoveries on this topic.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West Volume 1

The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United ...

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West  Volume 1

Monasticism, in all of its variations, was a feature of almost every landscape in the medieval West. So ubiquitous were religious women and men throughout the Middle Ages that all medievalists encounter monasticism in their intellectual worlds. While there is enormous interest in medieval monasticism among Anglophone scholars, language is often a barrier to accessing some of the most important and groundbreaking research emerging from Europe. The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West offers a comprehensive treatment of medieval monasticism, from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, cover a range of topics and themes and represent the most up-to-date discoveries on this topic.

Early Medieval Britain c 500 1000

Monasticism Beach, A. I., and Cochelin, I. (eds.) The New Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West. Volume I: Origins to the Eleventh Century (Cambridge University Press, 2020). Carver, M. Portmahomack: Monastery of ...

Early Medieval Britain  c  500   1000

Early medieval Britain saw the birth of England, Scotland and of the Welsh kingdoms. Naismith's introductory textbook explores the period between the end of Roman rule and the eve of the Norman Conquest, blending an engaging narrative with clear explanations of key themes and sources. Using extensive illustrations, maps and selections from primary sources, students will examine the island as a collective entity, comparing political histories and institutions as well as societies, beliefs and economies. Each chapter foregrounds questions of identity and the meaning of 'Britain' in this period, encouraging interrogation and contextualisation of sources within the framework of the latest debates and problems. Featuring online resources including timelines, a glossary, end-of-chapter questions and suggestions for further reading, students can drive their own understanding of how the polities and societies of early medieval Britain fitted together and into the wider world, and firmly grasp the formative stages of British history.

The Bonds of Love

Before the Gregorian Reform: The Latin Church at the Turn of the First Millennium. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2016. ———. “Eastern Influence on Western Monasticism, 850–1050.” In The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism ...

The Bonds of Love

"Explores the spirituality of St. Peter Damian, a reformer of church and society in the Middle Ages; explores tension between a call to solitude and holiness and a call to prophetic social and ecclesial engagement"--

Forgery and Memory at the End of the First Millennium

M. Brett and K. G. Cushing (Aldershot, 2008), 59–72 — — — , 'Monastic Canon Law in the Tenth, Eleventh, and Twelfth Centuries', in The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West, ed. A. I. Beach and I. Cochelin, ...

Forgery and Memory at the End of the First Millennium

An in-depth exploration of documentary forgery at the turn of the first millennium Forgery and Memory at the End of the First Millennium takes a fresh look at documentary forgery and historical memory in the Middle Ages. In the tenth and eleventh centuries, religious houses across Europe began falsifying texts to improve local documentary records on an unprecedented scale. As Levi Roach illustrates, the resulting wave of forgery signaled major shifts in society and political culture, shifts which would lay the foundations for the European ancien régime. Spanning documentary traditions across France, England, Germany and northern Italy, Roach examines five sets of falsified texts to demonstrate how forged records produced in this period gave voice to new collective identities within and beyond the Church. Above all, he indicates how this fad for falsification points to new attitudes toward past and present—a developing fascination with the signs of antiquity. These conclusions revise traditional master narratives about the development of antiquarianism in the modern era, showing that medieval forgers were every bit as sophisticated as their Renaissance successors. Medieval forgers were simply interested in different subjects—the history of the Church and their local realms, rather than the literary world of classical antiquity. A comparative history of falsified records at a crucial turning point in the Middle Ages, Forgery and Memory at the End of the First Millennium offers valuable insights into how institutions and individuals rewrote and reimagined the past.

Lives Identities and Histories in the Central Middle Ages

Such sources were often produced in male monastic environments and were designed to cultivate a local and institutional ... The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West (Cambridge University Press, 2020), vol. 1, pp.

Lives  Identities and Histories in the Central Middle Ages

Offers a new take on the identities and life histories of medieval people, in their multi-layered and sometimes contradictory dimensions.

The Oxford Handbook of the Merovingian World

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West 1 (pp. 162–194). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Dunn, M. (2000). The Emergence of Monasticism. From the Desert Fathers to the Early Middle Ages. Oxford: Blackwell.

The Oxford Handbook of the Merovingian World

In recent decades, the Merovingian world has become more visible in Anglophone historical studies. The forty-six essays included in this collection highlight the vitality and importance of the Merovingian kingdoms in the fifth through eighth centuries.

The Cambridge Companion to Hildegard of Bingen

... and Monastic Liturgy in the Latin West (High and Late Middle Ages),” in Alison I. Beach and Isabelle Cochelin, eds., The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West, 2 vols. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ...

The Cambridge Companion to Hildegard of Bingen

"The life of Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) has been recounted and her works have been explored in many languages and in many formats: in pamphlets, books, and newspapers; on the radio and in audio recordings; in film and television documentaries; and on countless websites and blogs"--

Learning as Shared Practice in Monastic Communities 1070 1180

monastery.13 Traditional monasticism was criticized – both outwardly and inwardly – for having relaxed its standards ... in The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2020, pp.

Learning as Shared Practice in Monastic Communities  1070 1180

In this study, Micol Long looks at Latin letters written in Western Europe between 1070 and 1180 to reconstruct how monks and nuns learned from each other in a continuous, informal and reciprocal way during their daily communal life.

Female vita Religiosa Between Late Antiquity and the High Middle Ages

This book considers the development of female religious life between Late Antiquity and the High Middle Ages.

Female  vita Religiosa  Between Late Antiquity and the High Middle Ages

This book considers the development of female religious life between Late Antiquity and the High Middle Ages. It is the first general study to address this earlier period. Chapters range widely over major themes associated with spiritual ideas and social functions, normative structures and spatial organization, forms of communal life, economic foundations, and social relationships. Along with these, "evolutionary" aspects - including charismatic beginnings and the activity of founders in relation to institutionalization, but also the effects of crises, reformation, and transformation - are examined in chronologically-broad and geographically-diverse settings, based on the analysis of significant phenomena and examples. The book provides a comparative approach, which will allow a better understanding of the dynamics, complexities, and differentiations in women's religious life, as well as their cultural importance and - in relation to the male religious - occasionally ambivalent status. (Series: Vita regularis - Ordnungen und Deutungen religiosen Lebens im Mittelalter. Abhandlungen - Vol. 47)

A Companion to the Abbey of Cluny in the Middle Ages

She is the author of Shaping a Monastic Identity: Liturgy and History at the Imperial Abbey of Farfa, 1000–1125 (Cornell ... Her most recent publication is the Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West, 2 vols.

A Companion to the Abbey of Cluny in the Middle Ages


The Oxford Handbook of Christian Monasticism

Revue Mabillon ( 1905- ) , The American Benedictine Review ( 1950- ) , and The Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies ... Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 6. ... The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West , 2 vols .

The Oxford Handbook of Christian Monasticism

The Handbook takes as its subject the complex phenomenon of Christian monasticism. It addresses, for the first time in one volume, the multiple strands of Christian monastic practice. Forty-four essays consider historical and thematic aspects of the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Protestant, and Anglican traditions, as well as contemporary 'new monasticism'. The essays in the book span a period of nearly two thousand years—from late ancient times, through the medieval and early modern eras, on to the present day. Taken together, they offer, not a narrative survey, but rather a map of the vast terrain. The intention of the Handbook is to provide a balance of some essential historical coverage with a representative sample of current thinking on monasticism. It presents the work of both academic and monastic authors, and the essays are best understood as a series of loosely-linked episodes, forming a long chain of enquiry, and allowing for various points of view. The authors are a diverse and international group, who bring a wide range of critical perspectives to bear on pertinent themes and issues. They indicate developing trends in their areas of specialisation. The individual contributions, and the volume as a whole, set out an agenda for the future direction of monastic studies. In today's world, where there is increasing interest in all world monasticisms, where scholars are adopting more capacious, global approaches to their investigations, and where monks and nuns are casting a fresh eye on their ancient traditions, this publication is especially timely.

Cistercian Stories for Nuns and Monks

“The Mass in Monastic Practice: Nuns and Ordained Monks.” In The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West, edited by Alison I. Beach and Isabelle Cochelin, 729–46. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020. ———.

Cistercian Stories for Nuns and Monks

In Cistercian Stories for Nuns and Monks, Martha G. Newman shows how Engelhard of Langheim's late twelfth-century tales about Cistercian monks illuminate the religiosity of Cistercian nuns. Engelhard's writings locate a sacramental value in everyday objects and behaviors and teach a spiritual formation that nuns and monks could share.

Climate Catastrophe and Faith

Guido Alfani and Cormac Ó Gráda, eds., Famine in European History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017). 7. ... eds., The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020).

Climate  Catastrophe  and Faith

One of the world's leading scholars of religious trends shows how climate change has driven dramatic religious upheavals. Long before the current era of man-made climate change, the world has suffered repeated, severe climate-driven shocks. These shocks have resulted in famine, disease, violence, social upheaval, and mass migration. But these shocks were also religious events. Dramatic shifts in climate have often been understood in religious terms by the people who experienced them. They were described in the language of apocalypse, millennium, and Judgment. Often, too, the eras in which these shocks occurred have been marked by far-reaching changes in the nature of religion and spirituality. Those changes have varied widely--from growing religious fervor and commitment; to the stirring of mystical and apocalyptic expectations; to waves of religious scapegoating and persecution; or the spawning of new religious movements and revivals. In many cases, such responses have had lasting impacts, fundamentally reshaping particular religious traditions. In Climate, Catastrophe, and Faith historian Philip Jenkins draws out the complex relationship between religion and climate change. He asserts that the religious movements and ideas that emerge from climate shocks often last for many decades, and even become a familiar part of the religious landscape, even though their origins in particular moments of crisis may be increasingly consigned to remote memory. By stirring conflicts and provoking persecutions that defined themselves in religious terms, changes in climate have redrawn the world's religious maps, and created the global concentrations of believers as we know them today. This bold new argument will change the way we think about the history of religion, regardless of tradition. And it will demonstrate how our growing climate crisis will likely have a comparable religious impact across the Global South.

The Routledge Handbook of East Central and Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages 500 1300

15–55; Jonathan Shepard, “The Byzantine Commonwealth, 1000–1550,” in The Cambridge History of Christianity, ... in The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West, edited by Alison I. Beach and Isabelle Cochelin ...

The Routledge Handbook of East Central and Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages  500 1300

The Routledge Handbook of East Central and Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 500–1300 is the first of its kind to provide a point of reference for the history of the whole of Eastern Europe during the Middle Ages. While historians have recognized the importance of integrating the eastern part of the European continent into surveys of the Middle Ages, few have actually paid attention to the region, its specific features, problems of chronology and historiography. This vast region represents more than two-thirds of the European continent, but its history in general—and its medieval history in particular—is poorly known. This book covers the history of the whole region, from the Balkans to the Carpathian Basin, and the Bohemian Forest to the Finnish Bay. It provides an overview of the current state of research and a route map for navigating an abundant historiography available in more than ten different languages. Chapters cover topics as diverse as religion, architecture, art, state formation, migration, law, trade and the experiences of women and children. This book is an essential reference for scholars and students of medieval history, as well as those interested in the history of Central and Eastern Europe.

Writing Normandy

800–1100],” in The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West, eds. Alison I. Beach and Isabelle Cochelin [Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020], vol. 1, pp. 63 and 67). Such statements hardly prepare a reader ...

Writing Normandy

Writing Normandy brings together eighteen articles by historian Felice Lifshitz, some of which are published here for the first time. The articles examine the various ways in which local and regional narratives about the past were created and revised in Normandy during the central Middle Ages. These narratives are analysed through a combination of both cultural studies and manuscript studies in order to assess how they functioned, who they benefitted, and the various contexts in which they were transmitted. The essays pay particular attention to the narratives built around venerated saints and secular rulers, and in doing so bring together narratives that have traditionally been discussed separately by scholars. The book will appeal to scholars and students of cultural history and medieval history, as well as those interested in manuscript studies. .

Virtuosos of Faith

Monks, Nuns, Canons, and Friars as Elites of Medieval Culture Gert Melville, James Mixson ... Antique and Early Medieval Monasticism, in: A. BEACH / I. COCHELIN , The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West, vol.

Virtuosos of Faith

For over a thousand years, monks, nuns, canons, friars, and others under religious vows stood at the pinnacle of Western European society. For their ascetic sacrifices, their learning, piety, and expertise, they were accorded positions of power and influence, and a wide range of legal, financial and social privileges. As such they present an important opportunity to consider the nature and dynamics of an "elite" in medieval culture. Using medieval religious life as their interpretive lens, the essays of this volume seek to uncover the essential markers of elite status. They explore how those under vows claimed and manifested elite status in complex spiritual, temporal, and social combinations. They explore the workings of elite status from day to day, across region and locale - who earned recognition and how, whether through specific achievements or the deployment of specific capacities; who recognized, conferred, or helped maintain elite status, how and why; how elite status could be redefined, contested or rejected. The essays also seek to understand how medieval European religious elites compared to those found in other cultures and settings, from Syria and South Asia to the early modern transatlantic world.

The Trauma of Monastic Reform

The Trauma of Monastic Reform This book opens a window on the lived experience of monastic reform in the twelfth century. Drawing on a variety of textual ... the Latin West for the Cambridge New History Series. The Trauma of Monastic ...

The Trauma of Monastic Reform

This book opens a window on the lived experience of monastic reform in the twelfth century. Drawing on a variety of textual and material sources from the south German monastery of Petershausen, it begins with the local process of reform and moves out into intertwined regional social, political, and ecclesiastical landscapes. Beach reveals how the shock of reform initiated decades of anxiety at Petershausen and raised doubts about the community's communal identity, its shifting internal contours and boundaries, and its place within the broader spiritual and social landscapes of Constance and Swabia. The Trauma of Monastic Reform goes beyond reading monastic narratives of reform as retrospective expressions of support for the deeds and ideals of a past generation of reformers to explore the real human impact that the process could have, both on the individuals who comprised the target community and on those who lived for generations in its aftermath.