The Campaigners

The Morland Dynasty, Book 14

The Campaigners

1815: Napoleon's escape from Elba and the preparations for battle entangle the Morland family in a web of romance and heartbreak. The Allied Army is gathering in Flanders, and where the army is, the fashionable world must go- so London society hastens to Brussels to enjoy the most exhilarating Season ever. For Heloise it brings a renewed acquaintance with her former suitor, to Duc de Veslne-d'Estienne; while Rosamund must finally come to terms with her feelings for her cousin Marcus; and for Sophie, a meeting with an enigmatic French major could well alter her future. But as romance flourishes in a warlike atmosphere, the looming shadow of battle only makes the dancers whirl more feverishly, and when the Army marches out to face the might of the French at Waterloo, one question is in every heart: which of them will not come back?

Perspectives on the History of British Feminism

Perspectives on the History of British Feminism

Facsimile reprint (with new introduction) of: Memories of a militant / by Annie Kenney. Originally published: London: Edward Arnold, 1924.

Strategic Maneuvering in Argumentative Discourse

Extending the Pragma-dialectical Theory of Argumentation

Strategic Maneuvering in Argumentative Discourse

In "Strategic Maneuvering in Argumentative Discourse," Frans H. van Eemeren" "brings together the dialectical and the rhetorical dimensions of argumentation by introducing the concept of strategic maneuvering. Strategic maneuvering refers to the arguer s continual efforts to reconcile aiming for effectiveness with being reasonable. It takes place in all stages of argumentative discourse and manifests itself simultaneously in the choices that are made from the topical potential available at a particular stage, in adaptation to audience demand, and in the use of specific presentational devices. Strategic maneuvering derails when in the specific context in which the discourse takes place a rule for critical discussion has been violated, so that a fallacy has been committed. Van Eemeren makes clear that extending the pragma-dialectical approach to argumentation by taking account of strategic maneuvering leads to a richer and more precise method for analyzing and evaluating argumentative discourse."

The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

Advocacy and Outcomes Around the World

The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

This book presents the first ever comprehensive overview of national laws recognising sign languages, the impacts they have and the advocacy campaigns which led to their creation. It comprises 18 studies from communities across Europe, the US, South America, Asia and New Zealand. They set sign language legislation within the national context of language policies in each country and show patterns of intersection between language ideologies, public policy and deaf communities’ discourses. The chapters are grounded in a collaborative writing approach between deaf and hearing scholars and activists involved in legislative campaigns. Each one describes a deaf community’s expectations and hopes for legal recognition and the type of sign language legislation achieved. The chapters also discuss the strategies used in achieving the passage of the legislation, as well as an account of barriers confronted and surmounted (or not) in the legislative process. The book will be of interest to language activists in the fields of sign language and other minority languages, policymakers and researchers in deaf studies, sign linguistics, sociolinguistics, human rights law and applied linguistics.

Not Ashamed

The Story of Jews for Jesus

Not Ashamed

Not Ashamed: The Story of Jews for Jesus chronicles the exciting birth and development of this high-powered evangelistic movement. Historian Ruth Tucker presents an unbiased, clear perspective on the fresh band of youthful zealots who, led by Martin "Moishe" Rosen, took to the streets of San Francisco in the early 1970s to win their world for Christ. Their compelling sidewalk evangelism and "broadsiding" of passersby with pointed, self-published tracts, produced massive conversions in the "Jesus People" era, and almost immediate conflict with Orthodox Jewish church leaders, who held that no one could be a Christian and a Jew at the same time. Fascinating reading!

The Roots of Environmental Consciousness

Popular Tradition and Personal Experience

The Roots of Environmental Consciousness

This book examines the roots of contemporary environmental consciousness and action in terms of both popular experience and tradition. A wide range of geographical and thematic case-studies explore the myth, tradition and collective memory that shape our environmental thought. Containing a wealth of empirical source material, this book will be invaluable for sociologists and historians alike.

Cannabis Britannica

Empire, Trade, and Prohibition 1800-1928

Cannabis Britannica

Cannabis Britannica explores the historical origins of the UK's legislation and regulations on cannabis preparations before 1928. It draws on published and unpublished sources from the seventeenth century onwards, from archives in the UK and India, to show how the history of cannabis and the British before the twentieth century was bound up with imperialism. James Mills argues that until the 1900s, most of the information and experience gathered by British sources were drawn from colonial contexts as imperial administrators governed and observed populations where use of cannabis was extensive and established. This is most obvious in the 1890s when British anti-opium campaigners in the House of Commons seized on the issue of Government of India excise duties on the cannabis trade in Asia in order to open up another front in their attacks on imperial administration. The result was that cannabis preparations became a matter of concern in Parliament which accordingly established the Indian Hemp Drugs Commission. The story in the twentieth century is of the momentum behind moves to include cannabis substances in domestic law and in international treaties. The latter was a matter of the diplomatic politics of imperialism, as Britain sought to defend its cannabis revenues in India against American and Egyptian interests. The domestic story focuses on the coming together of the police, the media, and the pharmaceutical industry to form misunderstandings of cannabis that forced it onto the Poisons Schedule despite the misgivings of the Home Office and of key medical professionals. The book is the first full history of the origins of the moments when cannabis first became subjected to laws and regulations in Britain.

Common Ground

The Japanese American National Museum and the Culture of Collaborations

Common Ground

Los Angeles's Japanese American National Museum, established in 1992, remains the only museum in the United States expressly dedicated to sharing the story of Americans of Japanese ancestry. The National Museum is a unique institution that operates in collaboration with other institutions, museums, researchers, audiences, and funders. In this collection of seventeen essays, anthropologists, art historians, museum curators, writers, designers, and historians provide case studies exploring collaboration with community-oriented partners in order to document, interpret, and present their histories and experiences and provide a new understanding of what museums can and should be in the United States. Current scholarship in museum studies is generally limited to interpretations by scholars and curators. Common Ground brings descriptive data to the intellectual canon and illustrates how museum institutions must be transformed and recreated to suit the needs of the twenty-first century.

Indifferent Inclusion

Aboriginal People and the Australian Nation

Indifferent Inclusion

Combining the perspectives of political, social, and cultural history in a coherent narrative, this account is a holistic interpretation of the complex relationship between Indigenous and settler Australians during the middle of the 20th century. As it provides a cogent analysis of how the relationship changed, this record focuses on the quest for Aboriginal inclusion in the Australian nation—a task that dominated the Aboriginal agenda at the time—and challenges existing scholarship and assumptions, particularly around assimilation. Arguing that inclusion was not a function of political lobbying and parliamentary decision making, this is an insightful history of the changing nature of race relations in Australia.