The Canadian Short Story

The Canadian Short Story : Status , Criticism , Historical Survey Reingard M. Nischik I incline to find more and more that the short story is one of the trickiest forms . —Dorothy Livesay ITS MAIN LINE OF DEVELOPMENT , the English ...

The Canadian Short Story

Beginning in the 1890s, reaching its first full realization by modernist writers in the 1920s, and brought to its heyday during the Canadian Renaissance starting in the 1960s, the short story has become Canada's flagship genre. It continues to attract the country's most accomplished and innovative writers today, among them Margaret Atwood, Mavis Gallant, Alice Munro, Clark Blaise, and many others. Yet in contrast to the stature and popularity of the genre and the writers who partake in it, surprisingly little literary criticism has been devoted to the Canadian short story. This book redresses that imbalance by providing the first collection of critical interpretations of thirty well-known and often-anthologized Canadian short stories from the genre's beginnings through the twentieth century. A historical survey of the genre introduces the volume and a timeline comparing the genre's development in Canada, the US, and Great Britain completes it. Geared both to specialists in and students of Canadian literature, the volume is of particular benefit to the latter because it provides not only a collection of interpretations, but a comprehensive introduction to the history of the Canadian short story. Contributors: Reingard M. Nischik, Martina Seifert, Heinz Antor, Julia Breitbach, Konrad Gross, Paul Goetsch, Dieter Meindl, Nina Kück, Stefan Ferguson, Rudolf Bader, Fabienne C. Quennet, Martin Kuester, Jutta Zimmermann, Silvia Mergenthal, Caroline Rosenthal, Wolfgang Klooss, Lothar Hönnighausen, Heinz Ickstadt, Gordon Bölling, Christina Strobel, Waldemar Zacharasiewicz, Maria and Martin Löschnigg, Nadja Gernalzick, Eva Gruber, Brigitte Glaser, Georgiana Banita. Reingard M. Nischik is Professor and Chair of American Literature at the University of Constance, Germany.

The Routledge Introduction to the Canadian Short Story

DOI: 10.4324/9781003142683-1 The Canadian short story fascinates. Slowly taking shape in the 19th and the early 20th century and gaining momentum in the 1980s, it has since evolved into Canada's most vibrant and diverse literary genre.

The Routledge Introduction to the Canadian Short Story

This volume aims to introduce undergraduates, graduates, and general readers to the diversity and richness of Canadian short story writing and to the narrative potential of short fiction in general. Addressing a wide spectrum of forms and themes, the book will familiarise readers with the development and cultural significance of Canadian short fiction from the early 19th century to the present. A strong focus will be on the rich reservoir of short fiction produced in the past four decades and the way in which it has responded to the anxieties and crises of our time. Drawing on current critical debates, each chapter will highlight the interrelations between Canadian short fiction and historical and socio-cultural developments. Case studies will zoom in on specific thematic or aesthetic issues in an exemplary manner. The Routledge Introduction to the Canadian Short Story will provide an accessible and comprehensive overview ideal for students and general readers interested in the multifaceted and thriving medium of the short story in Canada.

Double Voicing the Canadian Short Story

While Lynch and others would agree that the short story has been around since Confederation, there was an especially noted flowering of the Canadian short story in the 1960s and 1970s: see Gadpaille, Val Ross and Nischick's two ...

Double Voicing the Canadian Short Story

Double-Voicing the Canadian Short Story is the first comparative study of eight internationally and nationally acclaimed writers of short fiction: Sandra Birdsell, Timothy Findley, Jack Hodgins, Thomas King, Alistair MacLeod, Olive Senior, Carol Shields and Guy Vanderhaeghe. With the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature going to Alice Munro, the “master of the contemporary short story,” this art form is receiving the recognition that has been its due and—as this book demonstrates—Canadian writers have long excelled in it. From theme to choice of narrative perspective, from emphasis on irony, satire and parody to uncovering the multiple layers that make up contemporary Canadian English, the short story provides a powerful vehicle for a distinctively Canadian “double-voicing”. The stories discussed here are compelling reflections on our most intimate roles and relationships and Kruk offers a thoughtful juxtaposition of themes of gender, mothers and sons, family storytelling, otherness in Canada and the politics of identity to name but a few. As a multi-author study, Double-Voicing the Canadian Short Story is broad in scope and its readings are valuable to Canadian literature as a whole, making the book of interest to students of Canadian literature or the short story, and to readers of both.

The English Short Story in Canada

Even leaving international achievements aside, the contemporary Canadian short story is highly productive. for more than 30 years now, one in three governor general's awards (here: for fiction), Canada's top literary prize, ...

The English Short Story in Canada

 In 2013, the Nobel Prize for Literature was for the first time awarded to a short story writer, and to a Canadian, Alice Munro. The award focused international attention on a genre that had long been thriving in Canada, particularly since the 1960s. This book traces the development and highlights of the English-language Canadian short story from the late 19th century up to the present. The history as well as the theoretical approaches to the genre are covered, with in-depth examination of exemplary stories by prominent writers such as Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro.

The English Short Story in Canada

This book traces the development and highlights of the English-language Canadian short story from the late 19th century up to the present.

The English Short Story in Canada

In 2013, the Nobel Prize for Literature was for the first time awarded to a short story writer, and to a Canadian, Alice Munro. The award focused international attention on a genre that had long been thriving in Canada, particularly since the 1960s. This book traces the development and highlights of the English-language Canadian short story from the late 19th century up to the present. The history as well as the theoretical approaches to the genre are covered, with in-depth examination of exemplary stories by prominent writers such as Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro.

Penguin Book of Canadian Short Stories

This stunning collection of 60 stories—over a century’s worth of the best Canadian literature by an extraordinary array of our finest writers—has been selected and is introduced by award-winning writer Jane Urquhart.

Penguin Book of Canadian Short Stories

This stunning collection of 60 stories—over a century’s worth of the best Canadian literature by an extraordinary array of our finest writers—has been selected and is introduced by award-winning writer Jane Urquhart. Urquhart’s selection includes stories by major literary figures such as Mavis Gallant, Carol Shields, Alistair MacLeod, and Margaret Atwood, and wonderful stories by younger writers, including Dennis Bock, Joseph Boyden, and Madeleine Thien. This collection is uniquely organized into five parts: the immigrant experience, urban life, family drama, fantasy and metaphor, and celebrating the past.

The New Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories in English

A survey of Canada's leading writers features forty-seven stories, with new pieces by writers in the original Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories.

The New Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories in English

A survey of Canada's leading writers features forty-seven stories, with new pieces by writers in the original Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories. Included are short stories by W. P. Kinsella, Morley Callaghan, Timothy Findlay, Matt Cohen, Alice Munro and Margaret Atwood.

The Canadian Short Story

This survey traces the development of the Canadian short story from its 19th-century origins in the sketch and the tale to widespread international recognition in the 1980s.

The Canadian Short Story

This survey traces the development of the Canadian short story from its 19th-century origins in the sketch and the tale to widespread international recognition in the 1980s. Gadpaille traces the beginnings of realism in the work of such early writers as Roberts, Seton, Knister, Callaghan, and Garner; explores the positive and negative influence of the realist tradition in the work of later writers; and looks in depth at the work of the three most important modern practitioners of the Canadian short story--Mavis Gallant, Alice Munro, and Margaret Atwood.

A Comprehensive Bibliography of English Canadian Short Stories 1950 1983

A Comprehensive Bibliography of English Canadian Short Stories  1950 1983

This bibliography endeavors to record every short story written in English by a Canadian author and first published during the period 1950–1983, and contains 20,000 citations to stories by more than 5,300 authors. Organized alphabetically by author's last name, it includes references to anthology and story-collection appearances by these authors, thus providing a complete publishing history of each story cited. Hundreds of Canadian periodicals and dozens of anthologies were searched; in addition, the bibliography cites appearances by Canadian stories in foreign books and periodicals.

Dominant Impressions

However, these critics have tended to view the Canadian short story as a historically recent phenomenon. This reappraisal corrects this mistaken view by exploring the literary and cultural antecedents of the Canadian short story.

Dominant Impressions

Canadian critics and scholars, along with a growing number from around the world, have long recognized the achievements of Canadian short story writers. However, these critics have tended to view the Canadian short story as a historically recent phenomenon. This reappraisal corrects this mistaken view by exploring the literary and cultural antecedents of the Canadian short story. Published in English.

History of Literature in Canada

14 : The Modernist English - Canadian Short Story Reingard M. Nischik ( University of Constance ) ́N ITS MAIN LINE OF DEVELOPMENT , the English - Canadian short story is relatively recent hundred years to the present .

History of Literature in Canada

The development of literature in Canada with an eye to its multicultural, multiethnic, multilingual nature. From modest colonial beginnings, literature in Canada has arrived at the center stage of world literature. Works by English-Canadian writers -- both established writers such as Margaret Atwood and new talents such as Yann Martel -- make regular appearances on international bestseller lists. French-Canadian literature has also found its own voice in the North American and francophone worlds. CanLit has likewise developed into a staple of academic interest, pursued in Canadian Studies programs in Canada and around the world. This volume draws on the expertise of scholars from Canada, Germany, Austria, and France, tracing Canadian literature from the indigenous oral tradition to thedevelopment of English-Canadian and French-Canadian literature since colonial times. Conceiving of Canada as a single but multifaceted culture, it accounts for specific characteristics of English- and French-Canadian literatures, such as the vital role of the short story in English Canada or that of the chanson in French Canada. Yet special attention is also paid to Aboriginal literature and to the pronounced transcultural, ethnically diverse character ofmuch contemporary Canadian literature, thus moving clearly beyond the traditions of the two founding nations. Contributors: Reingard M. Nischik, Eva Gruber, Iain M. Higgins, Guy Laflèche, Dorothee Scholl, Gwendolyn Davies, Tracy Ware, Fritz Peter Kirsch, Julia Breitbach, Lorraine York, Marta Dvorak, Jerry Wasserman, Ursula Mathis-Moser, Doris G. Eibl, Rolf Lohse, Sherrill Grace, Caroline Rosenthal, Martin Kuester, Nicholas Bradley, Anne Nothof, Georgiana Banita, Gilles Dupuis, and Andrea Oberhuber. Reingard M. Nischik is Professor of American Literature at the University of Constance, Germany.

The Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories in English

Arranged chronologically with forty stories in all, the book provides an excellent survey of Canada's leading writers, including a story by Atwood herself ("The Sin Eater"), as well as stories by Morley Callaghan ("Last Spring They Came ...

The Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories in English

Arranged chronologically with forty stories in all, the book provides an excellent survey of Canada's leading writers, including a story by Atwood herself ("The Sin Eater"), as well as stories by Morley Callaghan ("Last Spring They Came Over"), Mordecai Richler ("The Summer My Grandmother Was Supposed to Die"), and Stephen Leacock ("The Marine Excursion of the Knights of Pythias"). The book features biographical notes and an index of authors.

The Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories in English

St Urbain Street , which plays a role in all these novels , is also celebrated in the short stories , including ' The Summer My Grandmother was Supposed to Die ' , collected in The Street ( 1969 ) . Sir CHARLES G.D. ROBERTS ( 1860-1943 ) ...

The Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories in English

Arranged chronologically with forty stories in all, the book provides an excellent survey of Canada's leading writers, including a story by Atwood herself ("The Sin Eater"), as well as stories by Morley Callaghan ("Last Spring They Came Over"), Mordecai Richler ("The Summer My Grandmother Was Supposed to Die"), and Stephen Leacock ("The Marine Excursion of the Knights of Pythias"). The book features biographical notes and an index of authors.

The Cambridge Companion to Canadian Literature

Gerald Lynch , The One and the Many : English - Canadian Short Story Cycles ( Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 2001 ) p . 9 . 5. See , for example , Michael Peterman , This Great Epoch of Our Lives : Susanna Moodie's Roughing It ...

The Cambridge Companion to Canadian Literature

A comprehensive and lively introduction to Canadian literature, its major genres, themes and preoccupations.

Canadian Short Stories Fifth Series

Preface This is the fifth short - story anthology I've edited for Oxford University Press in an occasional series called Canadian Short Stories . The first collection was published in 1960 , and as I wrote at the time , it was ...

Canadian Short Stories  Fifth Series

This collection contains stories by seventeen writers. Works by internationally acclaimed authors appear alongside stories both by younger writers and by writers whose native or non-Canadian heritage is introducing new strains into the noble tradition of the Canadian short story.

The Penguin Book of Canadian Short Stories

Alistair MacLeod refers to this habit of endurance on the part of certain narratives when , at the beginning of his long short story “ Vision , ” he states : I don't remember when I first heard the story but I remember the first time I ...

The Penguin Book of Canadian Short Stories

This stunning collection of 60 stories—over a century's worth of the best Canadian literature by an extraordinary array of our finest writers—has been selected and is introduced by award-winning writer Jane Urquhart. Urquhart's selection includes stories by major literary figures such as Mavis Gallant, Carol Shields, Alistair MacLeod, and Margaret Atwood, and wonderful stories by younger writers, including Dennis Bock, Joseph Boyden, and Madeleine Thien. This collection is uniquely organized into five parts: the immigrant experience, urban life, family drama, fantasy and metaphor, and celebrating the past.

North American Encounters

These essays (in English except for four items in German and French) provide an intercultural perspective.

North American Encounters

These essays (in English except for four items in German and French) provide an intercultural perspective. They deal with such diverse aspects of North American (including Quebecois) literature. The continental context also pervades treatments of novels (featuring Indian wars, sentimentalism, the West, and modern pícaros), story cycles (e.g., Atwood's), and the long poem (Kroetsch).

The One and the Many

This wide-ranging volume has much to say about the continuing relationship between place and identity in Canadian literature and culture.".

The One and the Many

This wide-ranging volume has much to say about the continuing relationship between place and identity in Canadian literature and culture.".

Canadian Short Stories

Canadian Short Stories


Short Story

Readers of this special issue about tripping across the 49th will not only have confirmed what they already knew — that the Canadian short story has been alive and well since the nineteenth century — but also discover that a number of ...

Short Story