The Changing Contract Across Generations

At the center of this collection of papers analyzing various facets of that conflict lie complex issues of generational equity--issues that will remain important for the framing of public policy during the 1990s, What do the young and the ...

The Changing Contract Across Generations

Generational conflict has attracted considerable attention in the media and within academic circles during the past decade. At the center of this collection of papers analyzing various facets of that conflict lie complex issues of generational equity--issues that will remain important for the framing of public policy during the 1990s, What do the young and the middle-aged owe the elderly? In discharging that debt, to what extent are they able to provide for their own old age in a climate of changing notions of welfare? What light do the longer perspectives of history shed on these issues? What role do kinship, gender, and economic status play? The papers commissioned by Bengtson and Achenbaum are intended to give greater analytic rigor to current debates. The volume is interdisciplinary not only by theoretical intent but by the practical imperatives of gerontology. More than a dozen sociologists, economists, historians, demographers, and policy analysts discuss the meanings and ambiguities that are inherent in terms such as "generation," "equity," "compact," "contract," and "conflict," in order to assess how relations between the age groups seem to vary from one sociohistorical context to the next. This distinguished group of contributors raises comparative issues throughout, assessing variations in generational ties by gender, race, class, and geographic location. Several project the extent to which recent changes in the political economy, public philosophy, and demographic structure of most "modern" societies presage greater conflicts, or greater consensus, in family members' relationships and social ties.

Ages Generations and the Social Contract

For the first time in history, three and sometimes four generations are living at the same time; this book examines the new interactions between family change, labour force participation and population ageing. Our societies are ageing.

Ages  Generations and the Social Contract

In this important and timely book, researchers from different countries compare their experiences and offer contrasting views on the future of social protection. They consider the theoretical aspects of the intergenerational debate, relations between generations within the family, the living standards of elderly people, and the question of social time. For the first time in history, three and sometimes four generations are living at the same time; this book examines the new interactions between family change, labour force participation and population ageing.

The Gerontological Prism Developing Interdisciplinary Bridges

E. J. Clarke, M. Preston, J. Raksin, and V. L. Bengtson, Types of Conflicts and Tensions between Older Parents and Adult Children ... M. W. Riley and J. W. Riley, Connections: Kin and Cohort, in The Changing Contract Across Generations, ...

The Gerontological Prism  Developing Interdisciplinary Bridges

"The Gerontological Prism" promotes disciplinary cooperation in aging research and practice. To some extent, each chapter explores a unified objective, that of generating a disciplinary-blind gerontology. The fundamental assumption throughout this book is that the aging individual and society can be enhanced by an understanding of the correlates of basic social, behavioral, demographic, economic, political, ethical, and biomedical processes involving aging. Each author touches on issues that have both social psychological, and practical policy significance. They aim toward sensitizing the reader to the possibilities of a properly informed interdisciplinary approach to gerontology.

A Young Generation Under Pressure

Effects of population ageing on obligations and expectations across age groups. In: Bengtson VL, Achenbaum WA (eds) The changing contract across generations. Aldine de Gruyter, New York, pp 3–24 Binstock RH (2000) Older people and ...

A Young Generation Under Pressure

Justice between generations is still not as prominent on any agenda as justice between rich and poor or men and women. For the first time, this three-part book explores the situation of young people of today in comparison to their direct predecessors. The first part, The Financial Situation of the Young Generation in a Generational Comparison, deals with this generation's financial standing; the second part, The Rush Hour of Life, examines their time restrictions. Both are considered from a life-course perspective. The third part, On the Path to Gerontocracy?, addresses the demographic shift in favor of the elderly in aging Western democracies.

Aging Social Inequality and Public Policy

"Discrimination over the Life-Course: A Synthetic Cohort Analysis of Earnings Differences between Black and White ... Aging and Generations at Century's End." Pp. 215-38 in The Changing Contract across Generations, edited by Vern L.

Aging  Social Inequality  and Public Policy

Fred C. Pampel describes how age combines with other components of inequality by comparing the influence of group membership on social inequality before and after the life course transition to old age. He looks at the differences in public policy and how age inequality -- more than the other sources of inequality -- relates closely to government policies and studies other societies in which both age group differences and overall inequality differ from those in the United States. Pampel makes a comparison of the United States with other nations a central component of the book, providing greater understanding of the larger forces that shape old age.

Kinship and Cohort in an Aging Society

From Generation to Generation Merril Silverstein, Roseann Giarrusso ... The Changing Contract across Generations, which concludes that the possibility of intergenerational conflict is genuine but leaves open the question of threats to ...

Kinship and Cohort in an Aging Society

Kinship and Cohort in an Aging Society brings together scholars whose common link is their intellectual intersection with the work of Vern Bengtson, an esteemed family sociologist whose accomplishments include foundational theoretical contributions to the study of families and intergenerational relations as well as the development of the widely used Longitudinal Study of Generations data set. The study began in 1971 and is the basis for Bengtson’s highly influential concept and measurement model, the intergenerational solidarity-conflict paradigm. This book serves as an excellent compendium of original research that examines how Bengtson’s solidarity model, a theory that informs nearly all intergenerational and gerontology sociology work performed today, continues to be relevant to scholars and practitioners. Written by internationally recognized scholars, the book’s fifteen chapters are mapped to five major thematic areas to which Bengtson’s research contributed: family connections; grandparents in a changing demographic landscape; generations and cohorts (micro-macro dialectics); religion and families in the context of continuity, change, and conflict; and global cross-national and cross-ethnic concerns. Key strengths of the book include the diversity of foci and data sources and the strong attention given to global and international issues. Kinship and Cohort in an Aging Society will appeal to scholars working in sociology, psychology, gerontology, family studies, and social work.

Shifts in the Social Contract

Understanding Change in American Society Beth Rubin ... Like the fair exchange that occurs in the market , the implicit contract across generations also has assumed a similarly fair exchange ( see Bengston and Achenbaum , The Changing ...

Shifts in the Social Contract

Examining the changes in society in the United States, Beth Rubin explains how the current era differs fundamentally from the post-World War Two period; how and why that change has occurred; and what its meaning is to everyday life. She traces the changes from a domestic to a global economy, the transformation of the workplace, and the impact that these changes have had on how other people are experiencing social aspects of their lives: their families and interpersonal relations, their communities and their experience of the culture of mass society.

Aging in East and West

For elderly persons, changes in old-age policies and cultural traditions may signal a break in the contract between generations, whether based on filial obligation or public transfers and programs. For the young, public benefits for the ...

Aging in East and West

Widely recognized experts present the first comparative analysis of recent developments among six Eastern and Western nations concerning population aging and its consequences. Chapters focus on demographic trends, sociocultural contexts, and policy implications. Nations selected as case studies include: the Peopleís Republic of China, the Republic of Korea, Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The editors and contributors call attention to the varied trajectories and effects of population aging in culturally diverse societies that are often at different stages or on different paths of economic development. Such analyses bring into sharper focus those conditions that are unique, or similar, and emphasize the ways in which cultural stereotypes of aging and the elderly complicate our understanding of the effects of world-wide population aging.

Family Ties and Aging

Is the “contract across generations” changing? Effects of population aging on obligations and expectations across age groups. Pp. 3–23 in V. L. Bengtson, & W. A. Achenbaum (Eds.), The changing contract across generations.

Family Ties and Aging

This advanced textbook covers issues of family ties and aging broadly, the goal being to provide an integrated and thorough representation of what we know from the current research. Whereas books on families and aging have traditionally focused on ties to a spouse and to children and grandchildren, Family Ties & Aging is more extensive and more reflective of contemporary society. The text includes groups and relationships that typically receive short shrift, exploring such neglected populations as single, divorced, and childless older people and their family relationships, as well as sibling relationships among the elderly, live-in partnerships not formalized by marriage, and the kinds of family ties forged by gay and lesbian persons over the life course. The book weaves the vast range of information we now have about the many facets of family relationships and aging into a critical, comprehensive, and integrated whole.

Generational Intelligence

Is the 'contract across generations' changing? Effects of population aging on obligations and expectations across age groups. In V.L. Bengtson and W.A. Achenbaum (Eds), The Changing Contract Across Generations (pp. 3–23).

Generational Intelligence

The question of communication and understanding between different generations is emerging as a key issue for the twenty-first century. The advent of ageing populations may lead to increased conflict or solidarity in society, and provokes a profound ambivalence both in public and in the private sphere. In a new approach, Biggs and Lowenstein offer a critical examination of Generational Intelligence as one way of addressing these issues. How easy is it to put yourself in the shoes of someone of a different age group? What are the personal, interpersonal and social factors that affect our perceptions of the ‘age other’? What are the key issues facing families, workplaces and communities in an ageing society? This book sets out a way of thinking about interpersonal relations based on age, and the question of communication between people of different ages and generations. The book challenges existing orthodoxies for relations between adults of different ages and draws out steps that can be taken to increase understanding between generational groups. The authors outline a series of steps that can be taken to enhance Generational Intelligence, examine existing theories and social issues, and suggest new directions for sustainable relations between generational groups.

Adulthood and Aging

Associations between early experiences with parents and well-being in old age. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 48, ... In V. L. Bengtson & W. A. Achenbaum (Eds.), The changing contract across generations (pp. 3–24).

Adulthood and Aging

In this volume distinguished scholars explore and apply the theoretical models of continuity and discontinuity to their research in adult development. The chapters address the different ways in which continuity is affected by change over the life course, as well as how individuals negotiate and maintain crucial continuities by adaptive change. Topics include adult life crises, illness, sibling relationships, and gender identity. Each chapter is followed by an insightful commentary. This book is a tribute to Bernice L. Neugarten for her contributions to the field of adult development, which includes the concept of continuities. Contributors include W. Andrew Achenbaum, Robert H. Binstock, James Birren, Bertram J. Cohler, Margaret Hellie Huyck, Boaz Kahana, Eva Kahana, Sheldon S. Tobin, Lillian E. Troll, Steven H. Zarit, and others.

Disciplining Old Age

Is the " Contract across Generations " Changing ? Effects of Population Aging on Obligations and Expectations across Age Groups . In The Changing Contract across Generations , ed . Bengtson and W. Andrew Achenbaum , 3-23 .

Disciplining Old Age

The conference was organized cooperatively with the Surface Engineering Division of the ASM, and as part of Materials Week, and so was attended by a wider range of scientists from academia and engineers from industry than usual. Funding cuts affecting travel budgets in many institutions however, reduced the overall number; those who were not able to attend can begin saving for the proceedings. The 43 papers cover ultrahard coatings, surface treatment and alternative processes, corrosion resistant coatings, characterizing coatings, the surface engineering of powders, laser processing, vapor deposition and plasma methods, and thermal spray coating and coatings for composites. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Local Church and Generational Change in Birmingham 1945 2000

Indeed, concentrating solely on cohorts in a purely demographic sense or 'social generations' in a mannheimian sense also risks overlooking cultural shifts in the ... 93 V. L. Bengtson, 'Is the “contract across generationschanging?

The Local Church and Generational Change in Birmingham  1945 2000

An examination of how religious identity changed in twentieth-century England, using Birmingham as a case-study to illuminate wider trends.

Family Ties and Aging

Is the “ contract across generations ” changing ? Effects of population aging on obligations and expectations across age groups . Pp . 3-23 in V.L. Bengtson and W. A. Achenbaum ( Eds . ) , The changing contract across generations .

Family Ties and Aging

"At last: a book that melds research on family ties in later life inclusively. Connidis' book is not simply a research compendium but a theoretical synthesis of value to both scholars and students. Connidis' clear writing style makes it an excellent choice for students... I recommend this book both to teachers and researchers in the areas of family and aging." -- JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY Presenting a broad examination of the issues surrounding family ties and aging, this advances textbook provides an integrated and thorough representation of current research in the field. Whereas book on families and aging have traditionally focused on ties to a spouse and to children and grandchildren, Connidis's coverage is more extensive and more reflective of contemporary society. She includes groups and relationships that have typically been neglected, such as single, divorced, and childless older people and their family relationships, as well as sibling relationships among the elderly, live-in partnerships not formalized by marriage, and the family ties forged by gays and lesbians over their life course. Family Ties and Aging weaves the vast range of information we now have about the many facets of family relationships and aging into a critical, comprehensive, and integrated whole.

Families and Faith

Is the “contract across generations” changing? Effects of population aging on obligations and expectations actress age groups. In V.L. Bengtson and W.A. Achenbaum (Eds.), The changing contract across generations (pp. 3–24).

Families and Faith

Winner of the Distinguished Book Award from American Sociology Association Sociology of Religion Section Winner of the Richard Kalish Best Publication Award from the Gerontological Society of America Few things are more likely to cause heartache to devout parents than seeing their child leave the faith. And it seems, from media portrayals, that this is happening more and more frequently. But is religious change between generations common? How does religion get passed down from one generation to the next? How do some families succeed in passing on their faith while others do not? Families and Faith: How Religion is Passed Down across Generations seeks to answer these questions and many more. For almost four decades, Vern Bengtson and his colleagues have been conducting the largest-ever study of religion and family across generations. Through war and social upheaval, depression and technological revolution, they have followed more than 350 families composed of more than 3,500 individuals whose lives span more than a century--the oldest was born in 1881, the youngest in 1988--to find out how religion is, or is not, passed down from one generation to the next. What they found may come as a surprise: despite enormous changes in American society, a child is actually more likely to remain within the fold than leave it, and even the nonreligious are more likely to follow their parents' example than to rebel. And while outside forces do play a role, the crucial factor in whether a child keeps the faith is the presence of a strong fatherly bond. Mixing unprecedented data with gripping interviews and sharp analysis, Families and Faith offers a fascinating exploration of what allows a family to pass on its most deeply-held tradition--its faith.

Reconstructing Old Age

Bengston , V. ( 1993 ) ' Is the " contract across generationschanging ? Effects of population aging on obligations and expectations across age groups ' , in V. Bengston and V.W. Achenbaum ( eds ) , The Changing Contract Across ...

Reconstructing Old Age

In this timely and authoritative overview on social gerontology and social theory, Chris Phillipson outlines the changing contexts and experiences associated with later life as we move into a new century. The book critically reviews the different theoretical explanations which attempt to explain these changes. Phillipson shows how in late modernity changes to pensions, employment and retirement, and intergenerational relations, are placing doubt on the meaning of growing old. He suggests that later life is being reconstructed as a period of potential choice on the one hand, but also of risk and danger on the other. This book will be essential reading for students and academics in social gerontology, as well as for students and academics in sociology, social policy and related disciplines interested in the future of an ageing population and the future of social gerontology.

Greed

Barkow, J. H. 1984, The distance between genes and culture, Journal of Anthropological Research, 40 (3), 367—79. ... In Vern L. Bengtson and W. Andrew Achenbaum (eds) The changing contract across generations. Aldine de Gruyter, New York ...

Greed

'Greed' is a visceral insult. It jabs below the belt, evoking guilty sensations of gluttony and lust. It taunts the rich and powerful, penetrating the cover of modern ideologies and institutions. Today, old-fashioned accusations of greed drag the larger-than-life corporate fat cats down to human bodily proportions, accusing them of gain without genuine growth. This lively new book is a wide-ranging inquiry into how greed works in our lives and in the world at large. Western philosophy has intellectualized human passions, explaining and justifying our expansive desires as 'rational self-interest'. However, an examination of the visceral power of greed tells us something about the apathy of modern theory. It shows us how confused we have become about the meanings of growth, creating false and morally hazardous distinctions between biology on the one hand, and history on the other. With greed as a guide, this book considers how the integrity of these meanings may be restored. This remarkable book will be of interest to anyone concerned about the morality of economic behavior in the modern world. It will be an important text for students in the social sciences, especially in anthropology, sociology, development studies, and business studies.

Ageing and intergenerational relations

insidiously, fear of uncontrollable speed of change, fear of the loss of employment, fear of losing ground to others in an increasingly unequal distribution of ... Bengtson, V.L. (1993) 'Is the “contract across generationschanging?

Ageing and intergenerational relations

With socio-economic and demographic changes taking place in contemporary societies, new patterns of family relations are forming partly due to significant family changes, value shifts, precariousness in the labour market, and increasing mobility within and beyond national boundaries. This book explores the exchange of support between generations and examines variations in contemporary practices and rationales in different regions and societies. It draws on both theoretical perspectives and empirical analysis in relation to new patterns of family reciprocity. Contributors discuss both newly emerging patterns and more established ones which are now being affected due to various opportunities and pressures in contemporary societies. The book is split into two parts, the first (Chapters one to four) reviews key theoretical and conceptual debates in this field, while the second (Chapter five to nine) offers insights and an understanding of exchange practices based on case studies from different regions and different relationships.

Immigrants and Boomers

Forging a New Social Contract for the Future of America Dowell Myers. ———. 2006b. ... In The Changing Contract Across Generations, edited by Vern L. Bengston and W. Andrew Achenbaum. New York: Aldine de Gruyter. Bensimon, Estela Mara.

Immigrants and Boomers

"This story of hope for both immigrants and native-born Americans is a well-researched, insightful, and illuminating study that provides compelling evidence to support a policy of homegrown human investment as a new priority. A timely, valuable addition to demographic and immigration studies. Highly recommended." —Choice Virtually unnoticed in the contentious national debate over immigration is the significant demographic change about to occur as the first wave of the Baby Boom generation retires, slowly draining the workforce and straining the federal budget to the breaking point. In this forward-looking new book, noted demographer Dowell Myers proposes a new way of thinking about the influx of immigrants and the impending retirement of the Baby Boomers. Myers argues that each of these two powerful demographic shifts may hold the keys to resolving the problems presented by the other. Immigrants and Boomers looks to California as a bellwether state—where whites are no longer a majority of the population and represent just a third of residents under age twenty—to afford us a glimpse into the future impact of immigration on the rest of the nation. Myers opens with an examination of the roots of voter resistance to providing social services for immigrants. Drawing on detailed census data, Myers demonstrates that long-established immigrants have been far more successful than the public believes. Among the Latinos who make up the bulk of California's immigrant population, those who have lived in California for over a decade show high levels of social mobility and use of English, and 50 percent of Latino immigrants become homeowners after twenty years. The impressive progress made by immigrant families suggests they have the potential to pick up the slack from aging boomers over the next two decades. The mass retirement of the boomers will leave critical shortages in the educated workforce, while shrinking ranks of middle-class tax payers and driving up entitlement expenditures. In addition, as retirees sell off their housing assets, the prospect of a generational collapse in housing prices looms. Myers suggests that it is in the boomers' best interest to invest in the education and integration of immigrants and their children today in order to bolster the ranks of workers, taxpayers, and homeowners America they will depend on ten and twenty years from now. In this compelling, optimistic book, Myers calls for a new social contract between the older and younger generations, based on their mutual interests and the moral responsibility of each generation to provide for children and the elderly. Combining a rich scholarly perspective with keen insight into contemporary political dilemmas, Immigrants and Boomers creates a new framework for understanding the demographic challenges facing America and forging a national consensus to address them.