The Child s Path to Spoken Language

How and why do children go from babbling to words? Locke's answer constitutes a journey through language development, taking in neurological, perceptual, social and linguistic aspects.

The Child s Path to Spoken Language

How and why do children go from babbling to words? Locke's answer constitutes a journey through language development, taking in neurological, perceptual, social and linguistic aspects. He describes infant behaviour, as it elicits and structures the stimulation needed for learning meaningful speech.

Advances in the Spoken Language Development of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

Cultural differences in beliefs and practices concerning talk to children. ... Parents as cointerventionists: Research on applications of naturalistic language teaching procedures. ... The child's path to spoken language.

Advances in the Spoken Language Development of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

Contributors present the latest information on both the new world evolving for deaf & hard-of-hearing children & the improved expectations for their acquisition of spoken language.

Early Language Acquisition of Mandarin Speaking Children

Review: The biology and education of language (Lieberman). ASHA, 28 (9), 73–74. Locke, J. L. (1993). The child's path to spoken language. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Lyons, J. (1968). Introduction to theoretical linguistics ...

Early Language Acquisition of Mandarin Speaking Children

Compared with other subdisciplines in Chinese linguistics, children’s language acquisition is a significant field with relatively limited achievements. Based on data from a dynamic and developmental corpus, this book is a comprehensive exploration of the early development of Chinese-speaking children’s language acquisition. Anchoring the discussions regarding phonetics, semantics and aspects of syntax in a cognitive and functional framework, the author conducts an in-depth analysis of many acquisition characteristics, such as the inevitable and incidental errors of their learning of initials; their ability to obtain the concept of time at a young age and the utilization of Le in the expression of the past tense; their understanding of subjectivity at a young age and the ability to express it; their learning of the degree of modality following the order of from probability to necessity; and children’s acquisition of syntactic structures being impacted by genetics and also affected by the steps involved in syntactic processing. Although genetics, cognition and experience all play a role in children’s language acquisition, this book focuses on the role of cognitive functions. By successfully explaining the acquisition rules based on some cutting-edge linguistic theories, the book will certainly be beneficial to scholars studying linguistics, psychology, cognitive science and early childhood educators.

From Gesture to Language in Hearing and Deaf Children

Likewise , Locke suggests that there may be manual or facial behaviors that look similar to signs but should be discarded because they occur in all prelinguistic infants . Locke ( 1993 ) , in his book The Child's Path to Spoken Language ...

From Gesture to Language in Hearing and Deaf Children

In 21 essays on communicative gesturing in the first two years of life, this vital collection demonstrates the importance of gesture in a child's transition to a linguistic system. Introductions preceding each section emphasize the parallels between the findings in these studies and the general body of scholarship devoted to the process of spoken language acquisition. Renowned scholars contributing to this volume include Ursula Bellugi, Judy Snitzer Reilly, Susan Goldwin-Meadow, Andrew Lock, M. Chiara Levorato, and many others.

Child Language

The Child's Path to Spoken Language. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Locke, J. L. and D. Pearson (1990). “Linguistic Significance of Babbling: Evidence from a Tracheostomized Infant.” Journal of Child Language 17(1): 1–16.

Child Language

The remarkable way in which young children acquire language has long fascinated linguists and developmental psychologists alike. Language is a skill that we have essentially mastered by the age of three, and with incredible ease and speed, despite the complexity of the task. This accessible textbook introduces the field of child language acquisition, exploring language development from birth. Setting out the key theoretical debates, it considers questions such as what characteristics of the human mind make it possible to acquire language; how far acquisition is biologically programmed and how far it is influenced by our environment; what makes second language learning (in adulthood) different from first language acquisition; and whether the specific stages in language development are universal across languages. Clear and comprehensive, it is set to become a key text for all courses in child language acquisition, within linguistics, developmental psychology and cognitive science.

Bringing Back the Child

Language Development after Extreme Deprivation (Children and Childhoods 4) Lisa J. Brown, Peter E. Jones ... Lenneberg, E. (1964) The capacity for language acquisition. ... (1993) The child's path to spoken language.

Bringing Back the Child

This book presents a unique, multi-faceted investigation of the language abilities of three older adopted Romanian orphans who experienced extreme deprivation in their early years. Serena, Gabrielle and Ingrid were aged 7 years, 6 years and nearly 4 years, respectively, when rescued by UK families from the orphanages where they were placed at or around their birth. In these institutions, an absence of social and psychological stimulation, nutritious food and physical exercise had left them completely dependent on care staff for their most basic needs, and effectively without language. The book presents the findings of a two year research study of the competencies in language, nonverbal cognition and social and communicative behaviour which the girls acquired over several years in their new homes, and discusses the implications of their linguistic progress for the Critical Period Hypothesis and modularity. Detailed qualitative analysis of the girls’ language in everyday conversation is combined with quantitative analysis of developmental progress and structural complexity and with the results of standardized tests. The authors argue that the girls’ progress in language defies the predictions of current Critical Period models and offers no evidence of modular dissociations between language and other cognitive domains. These findings are considered in relation to other research on language development in internationally adopted children.

Children s Language

Volume 11: Interactional Contributions To Language Development Keith E. Nelson, Ayhan Aksu-Ko‡. Blake, R. (1980). The acquisition of mood selection among Spanish-speaking children: Ages 4 to 12. ... The child's path to spoken language.

Children s Language

These volumes present coherent sets of papers developed along two of the thematic lines that underscored the program of the meeting of the International Association for the Study of Child Language in Istanbul in the summer of 1996. Thoroughly reviewed and updated to reflect the state of child language research and theory--particularly in the domains of discourse and interaction--they convey not only the flavor of that meeting but some of the most exciting trends in the field today. Each contribution in Volume 10,Developing Narrative and Discourse Competence, focuses on the differential effects of discourse genres, elicitation techniques, communicative contexts, literacy and schooling, and the oft-cited variables of age, language, and culture. Issues concerning the interrelations between social, cognitive, and affective capacities and processes in discourse are addressed. Each chapter raises theoretical questions regarding how and when representations are constructed to support new complexities. Presenting data from a cross-cultural and cross-linguistic perspective, this volume highlights both the particulars and the universals of the processes involved. The chapters in Volume 11, Interactional Contributions to Language Development, address issues including scaffolding of processing and learning in particular interactional sequences; linkages among interpersonal functions or relations, cognitive development, and semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic devices or forms; and models of how interactions proceed, input is selected, and learning advances across multiple rounds of interaction. Each of these volumes will be a valuable addition to the libraries of all who study the development of language.

The Development of Language

The child's path to spoken language. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Locke, J.L. (1993b). The role of the face in vocal learning and the development of spoken language. In B. de Boysson-Bardies, S. de Schonen, P. Jusczyk, ...

The Development of Language

This book presents a general overview of our current knowledge of language development in children. All the principal strands of language development are covered, including phonological, lexical, syntactic and pragmatic development; bilingualism; precursors to language development in infancy; and the language development of children with developmental disabilities, including children with specific language impairment. Written by leading international authorities, each chapter summarises clearly and lucidly our current state of knowledge, and carefully explains and evaluates the theories which have been proposed to account for children's development in that area.

An Anthology of Bilingual Child Phonology

Locke, J. (1993) The Child's Path to Spoken Language. New York: Academic Press. Marchman, V.A. and Bates, E. (1994) Continuity in lexical and morphological development: A test of the critical mass hypothesis. Journal of Child Language ...

An Anthology of Bilingual Child Phonology

This edited book is a collection of studies on protolanguage phonology, referring to the development of children’s autonomous linguistic systems from their first meaningful forms to complete cognitive and articulatory acquisition of language. The volume comprises chapters on child bilingual phonological development, understood as the acquisition or use of more than one linguistic code, whether actual languages, dialects, or communication modes, in an array of contexts. Such contexts include endogenous and exogenous bilingualism, heritage language, bilectalism, trilingualism, and typical and atypical use. The contributed works here will be of interest to researchers and postgraduate students investigating language acquisition in bi-/multilingual settings, as well as those working on child phonological development across a variety of languages.

Nonverbal Perceptual and Cognitive Processes in Children With Language Disorders

... of speech perception in the phonologically disordered child: Part I. A rationale, some criteria, the conventional tests. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 45, 431–444. Locke, J. (1993). The child's path to spoken language.

Nonverbal Perceptual and Cognitive Processes in Children With Language Disorders

A growing body of literature is suggesting that many children with language disorders and delays--even those with so-called specific language impairment--have difficulties in other domains as well. In this pathbreaking book, the authors draw on more than 40 years of research and clinical observations of populations ranging from various groups of children to adults with brain damage to construct a comprehensive model for the development of the interrelated skills involved in language performance, and trace the crucial implications of this model for intervention. Early tactual feedback, they argue, is more critical for the perceptual/cognitive organization of experiences that constitutes a foundation for language development than either visual or auditory input, and the importance of tactually-anchored nonverbal interaction cannot be ignored if efforts at treatment are to be successful. All those professionally involved in work with children and adults with language problems will find the authors' model provocative and useful.

Children with Specific Language Impairment

Departures in the spoken narratives of normal and language- disordered children. Applied Psycholinguistics, 8, 185–202. Lincoln, A., Courchesne, E., ... The child's path to spoken language. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Children with Specific Language Impairment

The landmark reference in the field, completely updated: a comprehensive treatment of a disorder that is more prevalent than autism.

Children s Speech Sound Disorders

58 Children's Speech Sound Disorders Hodson, B. W. & Paden, E. P. (1981). Phonological processes which ... Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 23, 254–260. Holder, W. (1669). ... The child's path to spoken language.

Children s Speech Sound Disorders

Speaking directly to experienced and novice clinicians, educators and students in speech-language pathology/speech and language therapy via an informative essay-based approach, Children’s Speech Sound Disorders provides concise, easy-to-understand explanations of key aspects of the classification, assessment, diagnosis and treatment of articulation disorders, phonological disorders and childhood apraxia of speech. It also includes a range of searching questions to international experts on their work in the child speech field. This new edition of Children’s Speech Sound Disorders is meticulously updated and expanded. It includes new material on Apps, assessing and treating two-year-olds, children acquiring languages other than English and working with multilingual children, communities of practice in communication sciences and disorders, distinguishing delay from disorder, linguistic sciences, counselling and managing difficult behaviour, and the neural underpinnings of and new approaches to treating CAS. This bestselling guide includes: Case vignettes and real-world examples to place topics in context Expert essays by sixty distinguished contributors A companion website for instructors at www.wiley.com/go/bowen/speechlanguagetherapy and a range of supporting materials on the author’s own site at speech-language-therapy.com Drawing on a range of theoretical, research and clinical perspectives and emphasising quality client care and evidence-based practice, Children’s Speech Sound Disorders is a comprehensive collection of clinical nuggets, hands-on strategies, and inspiration.

Children with Specific Language Impairment second edition

Departures in the spoken narratives of normal and language- disordered children. Applied Psycholinguistics, 8, 185–202. Lincoln, A., Courchesne, E., ... The child's path to spoken language. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Children with Specific Language Impairment  second edition

The landmark reference in the field, completely updated: a comprehensive treatment of a disorder that is more prevalent than autism. Children with specific language impairment (SLI) show a significant deficit in spoken language that cannot be attributed to neurological damage, hearing impairment, or intellectual disability. More prevalent than autism and at least as prevalent as dyslexia, SLI affects approximately seven percent of all children; it is longstanding, with adverse effects on academic, social, and (eventually) economic standing. The first edition of this work established Children with Specific Language Impairment as the landmark reference on this condition, considering not only the disorder's history, possible origins, and treatment but also what SLI might tell us about language organization and development in general. This second edition offers a complete update of the earlier volume. Much of the second edition is completely new, reflecting findings and interpretations based on the hundreds of studies that have appeared since the publication of the first edition in 1997. Topics include linguistic details (descriptive and theoretical), word and sentence processing findings, genetics, neurobiology, treatment, and comparisons to such conditions as autism spectrum disorders, ADHD, and dyslexia. The book covers SLI in children who speak a wide range of languages, and, although the emphasis is on children, it also includes studies of adults who were diagnosed with SLI as children or are the parents of children with SLI. Written by a leading scholar in the field, Children with Specific Language Impairment offers the most comprehensive, balanced, and unified treatment of SLI available.

An Introduction to Child Language Development

Kunsmann, P. (1976) Reduplication as a strategy for language acquisition. Paper presented at the summer ... Lakshmanan, U. (1994) Universal Grammar in Child Second Language Acquisition. ... (1993) The Child's Path to Spoken Language.

An Introduction to Child Language Development

This volume introduces the field of child language development studies, and presents hypotheses in an accessible, largely non-technical language, aiming to demonstrate the relationship between these hypotheses and interpretations of data. It makes the assumption that having a theory of language development is as important as having reliable data about what children say and understand, and it advocates a combination of both `rationalist' and more 'empiricist' traditions. In fact, the author overtly argues that different traditions provide different pieces of the picture, and that taking any single approach is unlikely to lead to productive understanding. Susan Foster-Cohen explores a range of issues, including the nature of prelinguistic communication and its possible relationship to linguistic development; early stages of language development and how they can be viewed in the light of later developments; the nature and role of children's experience with the language(s) around them; variations in language development due to both pathological and non-pathological differences between children, and (in the latter case) between the languages they learn; later oral language development; and literacy. The approach is distinctly psycholinguistic and linguistic rather than sociolinguistic, although there is significant treatment of issues which intersect with more sociolinguistic concerns (e.g. literacy, language play, and bilingualism). There are exercises and discussion questions throughout, designed to reinforce the ideas being presented, as well as to offer the student the opportunity to think beyond the text to ideas at the cutting edge of research. The accessible presentation of key issues will appeal to the intended undergraduate readership, and will be of interest to those taking courses in language development, linguistics, developmental psychology, educational linguistics, and speech pathology. The book will also serve as a useful introduction to students wishing to pursue post-graduate courses which deal with child language development.

Toward A Genetics of Language

The use of Hebrew verb morphology by children with specific language impairment and children developing language normally. FirstLanguage, [4, 283-304. Locke, J. (1993). The child's path to spoken language.

Toward A Genetics of Language

The past decade has brought important new advances in the fields of genetics, behavioral genetics, linguistics, language acquisition, studies of language impairment, and brain imaging. Although these advances are each highly relevant to the determination of what a child is innately prepared to bring to language acquisition, the contributing fields of endeavor have traditionally been relatively self-contained, with little cross communication. This volume was developed with the belief that there is considerable value to be gained in the creation of a shared platform for a dialogue across the disciplines. Leading experts in genetics, linguistics, language acquisition, language impairment, and brain imaging are brought together for the purpose of exploring the current evidence, theoretical issues, and research challenges in a way that bridges disciplinary boundaries and points toward future developments in the search for the genetic and environmental bases of language acquisition and impairments. This collection provides discussions and summaries of: *breakthrough findings of the genetic underpinnings of dyslexia; *theoretical and empirical developments in the specification of a phenotype of language acquisition and impairment; *evidence of familiarity and twin concordances of specific language impairment; and *new evidence from brain imaging. It concludes with a critical response from an advocate of rational empiricism.

Current Perspectives on Child Language Acquisition

How children use their environment to learn Caroline F. Rowland, Anna L. Theakston, Ben Ambridge, Katherine E. Twomey. Locke , J. L. ( 1993 ) . The child's path to spoken language . Cambridge , MA : Harvard University Press .

Current Perspectives on Child Language Acquisition

In recent years the field has seen an increasing realisation that the full complexity of language acquisition demands theories that (a) explain how children integrate information from multiple sources in the environment, (b) build linguistic representations at a number of different levels, and (c) learn how to combine these representations in order to communicate effectively. These new findings have stimulated new theoretical perspectives that are more centered on explaining learning as a complex dynamic interaction between the child and her environment. This book is the first attempt to bring some of these new perspectives together in one place. It is a collection of essays written by a group of researchers who all take an approach centered on child-environment interaction, and all of whom have been influenced by the work of Elena Lieven, to whom this collection is dedicated.

Language Acquisition By Eye

A cross-linguistic study of prosodic modification in mothers' and fathers' speech to preverbal infants. Journal of Child Language, 16, 477-501. Garnica, O. (1977). Some prosodic and paralmguistic features of speech to young children.

Language Acquisition By Eye

This book focuses on the early acquisition of signed languages and the later development of reading by children who use signed languages. It represents the first collection of research papers focused solely on the acquisition of various signed languages by very young children--all of whom are acquiring signed languages natively, from deaf parents. It is also the first collection to investigate the possible relationships between the acquisition of signed language and reading development in school-aged children. The underlying questions addressed by the chapters are how visual-gestural languages develop and whether and how visual languages can serve the foundation for learning a second visual representation of language, namely, reading. Language Acquisition by Eye is divided into two parts, anchored in the toddler phase and the school-pupil phase. The central focus of Part I is on the earliest stages of signed language acquisition. The chapters in this part address important questions as to what "babytalk" looks like in signed language and the effect it has on babies' attention, what early babbling looks like in signed language, what babies' earliest signs look like, how parents talk to their babies in signed language to ensure that their babies "see" what's being said, and what the earliest sentences in signed languages tell us about the acquisition of grammar. With contrasting research paradigms, these chapters all show the degree to which parents and babies are highly sensitive to one another's communicative interactions in subtle and complex ways. Such observations cannot be made for spoken language acquisition because speech does not require that the parent and child look at each other during communication whereas signed language does. Part II focuses on the relationship between signed language acquisition and reading development in children who are deaf. All of these chapters report original research that investigates and uncovers a positive relationship between the acquisition and knowledge of signed language and the development of reading skills and as a result, represents a historical first in reading research. This section discusses how current theory applies to the case of deaf children's reading and presents new data that illuminates reading theory. Using a variety of research paradigms, each chapter finds a positive rather than a negative correlation between signed language knowledge and usage, and the development of reading skill. These chapters are sure to provide the foundation for new directions in reading research.

Children s Communication Skills

Locke, J. L. (1993) The Child's Path to Spoken Language, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Lorenz, S. (1998) Children with Down's Syndrome: A guide for teachers and learning support assistants in mainstream primary and secondary ...

Children s Communication Skills

Based on a huge body of research in child language and communication development, Children's Communication Skills uses a clear format to set out the key stages of communication development in babies and young children. Its aim is to increase awareness in professionals working with children of what constitutes human communication and what communication skills to expect at any given stage. Illustrated throughout with real-life examples, this informative text addresses: normal development of verbal and non-verbal communication skills the importance of play in developing these skills developmental communication problems bilingualism, cognition and early literacy development working with parents of children with communication difficulties. Features designed to make the book an easy source of reference include chapter summaries, age-specific skills tables, sections on warning signs that further help may be needed, and a glossary of key terms. It will be of great use to a wide range of professionals in training or working in health, education and social care.

The Evolutionary Emergence of Language

Function morphemes in young children's speech perception and production . ... Symbolic gesture versus word : is there a modality advantage for onset of symbol use ? Child Development 64 ... The Child's Path to Spoken Language .

The Evolutionary Emergence of Language

This book covers the origins of language, combining social and natural science perspectives.

Developmental Disorders of Language Learning and Cognition

Phonological processing skills in speech and language impaired children. ... Individual differences in anatomy predict reading and oral language impairments in children. Brain, 129, 3329–3342. ... The child's path to spoken language.

Developmental Disorders of Language Learning and Cognition

This important new text is a comprehensive survey of currentthinking and research on a wide range of developmental disorders. Highlights key research on normal and typical development Includes clinical case studies and diagrams to illustrate keyconcepts A reader-friendly writing style