Chinese Australians

While the Chinese Australian Herald interpreted Confucius thought in order to promote racial harmony, the Tung Wah Times interpreted it in order to promote progressivism and capital liberty, while the Chinese Times interpreted Confucian ...

Chinese Australians

In Chinese Australians: Politics, Engagement and Resistance key scholars of Chinese-Australian history explore how Chinese Australians in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries influenced the communities in which they lived on a civic or individual level.

The Chinese Times

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

The Chinese Times

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Alas what Brought Thee Hither

This study recovers the history of immigrants who left scant records of their struggle to survive in a society in which the Chinese were reviled as dangerous, opium-soaked, and unassimilable.

Alas  what Brought Thee Hither

This study recovers the history of immigrants who left scant records of their struggle to survive in a society in which the Chinese were reviled as dangerous, opium-soaked, and unassimilable. It is based on about 3,000 contemporary newspaper and magazine articles that reflect the prejudices of the times, a major element shaping the history of the Chinese in New York. More than 170 illustrations from newspapers and magazines of the time recapture the stereotyping that justified ghettoization and denial of employment opportunities.

Saltwater City

4 Chinese Times, 21 January 1914. David Lai, “Chinese Attempts to Discourage Emigration to Canada,” B.C. Studies 18 (Summer 1973):45–48. 6 Chinese Times, 1 February 1915, 26; 31 January 1916; 12 May 1916. 7 Chinese Times, 26 May 1916; ...

Saltwater City

Written by Paul Yee, a third-generation Chinese-Canadian in search of his own roots as well as those of the community, Saltwater City brings the perceptions of a previously diffident community to its own history. A text resonant with often painful first-person recollections combines with 200 photographs, most reproduced for the first time, to form a chronological portrait of the community from its earliest beginnings to the present. With the assimilation of its people into the mainstream of Canadian life following World War II, Saltwater City, as early Chinese immigrants called the community, was threatened, but changes in attitude, government policy, and the opening of diplomatic relations with China instead caused a renaissance. Now, Vancouver's Chinese community totals over 150,000 people, enjoys considerable political and financial influence and has matured beyond recognition into one of Canada's most successful ethnic enclaves.

The Chinese in Vancouver 1945 80

See also the numerous reports in the January and February 1954 issues of the Chinese Times. See the February 1959 and early 1962 issues of the Chinese Voice. Chinese Voice, 5 October 1963, 30 October 1965, and 5 November 1969.

The Chinese in Vancouver  1945 80

In The Chinese in Vancouver, Wing Chung Ng captures the fascinating story of the city's Chinese in their search for identity. He juxtaposes the cultural positions of different generations of Chinese immigrants and their Canadian-born descendants and unveils the ongoing struggle over the definition of being Chinese. It is an engrossing story about cultural identity in the context of migration and settlement, where the influence of the native land and the appeal of the host city continued to impinge on the consciousness of the ethnic Chinese.

Chinatown Opera Theater in North America

See a professional photographer's notice warning against plagiarism, Chinese Times, April 13, 15, 1921. 35. Chinese Times, June 11, 1919. 36. ... The notice was printed daily for a week; see Chinese Times, February 11–18, 1919. 39.

Chinatown Opera Theater in North America

The Chinatown opera house provided Chinese immigrants with an essential source of entertainment during the pre “World War II era. But its stories of loyalty, obligation, passion, and duty also attracted diverse patrons into Chinese American communities Drawing on a wealth of new Chinese- and English-language research, Nancy Yunhwa Rao tells the story of iconic theater companies and the networks and migrations that made Chinese opera a part of North American cultures. Rao unmasks a backstage world of performers, performance, and repertoire and sets readers in the spellbound audiences beyond the footlights. But she also braids a captivating and complex history from elements outside the opera house walls: the impact of government immigration policy; how a theater influenced a Chinatown's sense of cultural self; the dissemination of Chinese opera music via recording and print materials; and the role of Chinese American business in sustaining theatrical institutions. The result is a work that strips the veneer of exoticism from Chinese opera, placing it firmly within the bounds of American music and a profoundly American experience.

Colonialism China and the Chinese

29 Table of KMT membership in Sydney and Melbourne indicating counties of origin in China. ... 30 Chinese Australian Herald, 11 September 1920, Supplement; Tung Wah Times, 11 September 1920, 7; Chinese Republican News, 11 September 1920 ...

Colonialism  China and the Chinese

This book explores the place of China and the Chinese during the age of imperialism. Focusing not only on the state but also on the vitality of Chinese culture and the Chinese diaspora, it examines the seeming contradictions of a period in which China came under immense pressure from imperial expansion while remaining a major political, cultural and demographic force in its own right. Where histories of China commonly highlight episodes of conflict and subjugation in China’s relations with the West, the contributions to this volume explore the complex spaces where empires and their peoples did not merely collide but also became entangled.

Media and the Chinese Diaspora

Nevertheless, he grew up reading the Chinese Times,the only paperthat his family subscribed to.Low subscribed tothe same newspaper after he married because hiswife, awarbride who came in 1947, was not able to read English.

Media and the Chinese Diaspora

The importance of the Chinese diaspora is widely recognized. Wanning Sun examines the key role of the media in the Chinese diaspora. She focuses especially on the media's role in communication, in fostering a sense of community, in defining different kinds of 'transnational Chineseness' - overseas Chinese communities are often very different from one country to another - and in showing how media communication is linked to commerce, which is often a key activity of the overseas Chinese. Revealing a great deal about the vibrancy and dynamism of the Chinese-language media, the book considers the Chinese diaspora in Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand and Australia, showing how it plays a crucial role in the changing nature of the Chinese diaspora.

A Research Guide to China Coast Newspapers 1822 1911

CHINA : OTHER CITIES Tientsin 7.1 Chinese Times , 1886-1891 T'ien - chin shih - pao . * ; # # Publisher and editor : Alexander Mi chie The Chinese Times was founded and edited by Alexander Michie and ceased publication when he retired ...

A Research Guide to China Coast Newspapers  1822   1911

A pioneering study of some 200 foreign language newspapers located in China published between 1822 and 1911. Includes information on editors, publishers, history, publishing purpose, and locations of existing copies.

Chinese America History and Perspectives 1988

The company opened for business in San Francisco on November 1, 1921, and changed its name to the Chinese Times Publishing Company in 1926. After a shaky beginning the membership decided to increase the company's capitalization so that ...

Chinese America  History and Perspectives 1988


Claiming America

The company opened for business in San Francisco on November 1 , 1921 , and changed its name to the Chinese Times Publishing Company in 1926. It had a shaky beginning until the membership decided to increase the company's capitalization ...

Claiming America

A fascinating collection of essays that recovers the lives and experiences of individuals who staked their claim to Chinese American identity. The first section of the book focuses on the in-coming immigrants. The second section looks at their children, who deeply felt the contradictions between Chinese and American culture, but attempted to find a balance between the two.

Global Media Spectacle

Punctuated with witty and incisive examples, the book provides a useful description of contestation and alliance, themes and variations, and convergence and divergence between and within various blocs of nations.

Global Media Spectacle

Uses Hong Kong’s transfer from Britain to China to explore how media coverage is guided by ideological struggle. Focusing on the global media coverage of Hong Kong’s transfer from Britain to China, Global Media Spectacle explores how the world media plan, operate, compete, and produce a historical record during significant global events. The authors interviewed seventy-six print and television reporters from the United States, Britain, the People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Canada, and Japan to delve into the revealing world of writing first drafts of history from reporters’ vantage points. Punctuated with witty and incisive examples, the book provides a useful description of contestation and alliance, themes and variations, and convergence and divergence between and within various blocs of nations. Chin-Chuan Lee is Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota and Director of the China Times Center for Media and Social Studies. In the School of Journalism and Communication, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Joseph Man Chan is Professor and Clement Y. K. So is Associate Professor. Zhongdang Pan is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Arts, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

The Poison of Polygamy

... stocked with revolutionary periodicals and books,17and the Chinese Times also held public lectures on patriotism ... a number which grew over time.18 e Chinese Times developed a more colloquial written style to attract readers to ...

The Poison of Polygamy

Serialised in 1909–10, The Poison of Polygamy is a rare gem of Australian literature. The first novel of the Chinese Australian experience, it is a roller-coaster tale of blackmail, murder, betrayal and even thylacine attack, partly based on real people, places and events. Revealing the human face of migration between imperial China and colonial Australia, it recounts the story of a man from southern China who tries his luck on the Victorian goldfields, the wife he leaves behind, and their eventual fraught reunion. In this bilingual parallel edition, Australia’s and possibly the West’s earliest Chinese-language novel is presented in English translation for the first time. Illuminating introductions explore the work’s historical, cultural and linguistic context, and establish its unique significance in Australia’s literary and social history. “A shiny little nugget has been disinterred from the tailings of our literary past … The Poison of Polygamy is an exciting addition to our literary history that deserves to be widely discussed and analysed in both China and Australia.” David Walker, Emeritus Professor, Deakin University and author of Anxious Nation “The discovery of The Poison of Polygamy and its publication in this highly informative bilingual edition is a double happiness. It gives readers a highly entertaining new novel, replete with drama, emotion and intrigue. At the same time it documents Chinese Australian life in a key period of history.” Nicholas Jose, author of Avenue of Eternal Peace

Between Mao and McCarthy

William Hoy, The Chinese Six Companies (San Francisco: Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, 1940), 16b. John Yehall Chin was actually a paper son who naturalized in 1957. Chinese Times, “Minzhong zhi lingxiu” (The people's ...

Between Mao and McCarthy

During the Cold War, Chinese Americans struggled to gain political influence in the United States. Considered potentially sympathetic to communism, their communities attracted substantial public and government scrutiny, particularly in San Francisco and New York. Between Mao and McCarthy looks at the divergent ways that Chinese Americans in these two cities balanced domestic and international pressures during the tense Cold War era. On both coasts, Chinese Americans sought to gain political power and defend their civil rights, yet only the San Franciscans succeeded. Forging multiracial coalitions and encouraging voting and moderate activism, they avoided the deep divisions and factionalism that consumed their counterparts in New York. Drawing on extensive research in both Chinese- and English-language sources, Charlotte Brooks uncovers the complex, diverse, and surprisingly vibrant politics of an ethnic group trying to find its voice and flex its political muscle in Cold War America.

The Chinese in Europe

Different terms are used to distinguish between Chinese citizens residing abroad (huaqiao); Chinese with overseas citizenship (waiji huaren); and Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan compatriots ... Siyu Chinese Times, 83 (April 1996), p. 18.

The Chinese in Europe

The Chinese are among Europe's oldest immigrant communities, and are now, in several countries, among the biggest and, economically, the most powerful, drawing increasing interest from other ethnic minorities, governments, and researchers. This volume opens up and delineates this new field of European overseas Chinese studies, reporting on pioneering research on the Chinese in Britain, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, and exploring the networks, self-organizations, and migration patterns that are the fabric of the Chinese community in Europe, together with the issues of identity, language, integration, and community building that Chinese throughout the continent face.

Celebrating Canada

From the time of the Diamond Jubilee onwards, the pattern of competitive coordination remained, with place given in the press and among the population to both Chinese Humiliation Day and Dominion Day. This can be seen both through the ...

Celebrating Canada

In Celebrating Canada, Matthew Hayday and Raymond Blake situate Canada in an international context as they examine the history and evolution of our national and provincial holidays and annual celebrations

Schooling in Transition

72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 tant letter], Chinese Times, Oct. 3, 1922, 3. Such activities led to fears among the whites of Victoria that a boycott of Canadian goods would be effected in China; see, ...

Schooling in Transition

An exploration of two centuries of formal education in Canada in which the accomodation of minority needs and local versus central control are recurring themes.