The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga

Shinch?-K? ki<, the work translated here into English under the title “The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga,” is the most important source on the career of one of the best known figures in all of Japanese history—Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582), ...

The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga

Shinch?-K? ki<, the work translated here into English under the title “The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga,” is the most important source on the career of one of the best known figures in all of Japanese history—Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582), the first of the “Three Heroes” who unified Japan after a century of fragmentation and internecine bloodshed. The other two of the triad, Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1537-1598) and Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543-1616), also make frequent appearances in this chronicle, playing prominent although clearly subordinate roles. So the chronicle also is an important source on their early careers, as it is on a constellation of other actors in Japan’s sixteenth-century drama. The chronicle’s author, ?ta Gy?ichi, was Nobunaga’s former retainer and an eyewitness of some of the events he describes. He completed his work about the year 1610.

The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga

The first of these “Three Heroes” who unified Japan—the prime mover of unification—is the hero of Shinchō-Kō ki, the work translated here into English under the title “The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga.” It is the most important source on ...

The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga

Shinchō-Kō ki, the work translated here into English under the title “The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga,” is the most important source on the career of one of the best known figures in all of Japanese history—Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582), the first of the “Three Heroes” who unified Japan after a century of fragmentation and internecine bloodshed.

Sources of East Asian Tradition Premodern Asia

ODA NOBUNAGA THE ASSAULT ON MOUNT HIEI AND THE BLESSINGS OF NOBUNAGA As this extract from The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga ( Shincho - Kõ ki ) seeks to demonstrate , Nobunaga's assault on the Enryakuji was not so much a wanton act of ...

Sources of East Asian Tradition  Premodern Asia

In Sources of East Asian Tradition, Wm. Theodore de Bary offers a selection of essential readings from his immensely popular anthologies Sources of Chinese Tradition, Sources of Korean Tradition, and Sources of Japanese Tradition so readers can experience a concise but no less comprehensive portrait of the social, intellectual, and religious traditions of East Asia. Volume 1 samples writings from the earliest times to 1600, illuminating life in early China and the first imperial age, as well as the profound impact of Daoism, Buddhism, the Confucian revival, and Neo-Confucianism; the origins of Korean culture and political structures, up through the Choson dynasty; and major developments in early and medieval Japan. De Bary maintains his trademark balance of source materials, including seminal readings in the areas of history, society, politics, education, philosophy, and religion, thereby continuing his own tradition of providing an exceptional resource for teachers, scholars, students, and the general reader.

Yasuke

The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga. Leiden, NL: Brill, 2011. Sadler, A. L. Shogun: The Life of Tokugawa Ieyasu. Tokyo and Vermont: Tuttle Publishing, 2009. Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai: A Military History. London: Routledge, 1977.

Yasuke

WARRIOR. SAMURAI. LEGEND. The remarkable life of history's first foreign-born samurai, and his astonishing journey from Northeast Africa to the heights of Japanese society. The man who came to be known as Yasuke arrived in Japan in the 16th century, an indentured mercenary arriving upon one of the Portuguese ships carrying a new language, a new religion and an introduction to the slave trade. Curiously tall, bald, massively built and black skinned, he was known as a steadfast bodyguard of immense strength and stature, and swiftly captured the interest, and thence the trust, of the most powerful family in all of Japan. Two years later, he vanished. Yasuke is the story of a legend that still captures the imagination of people across the world. It brings to life a little known side of Japan - a gripping narrative about an extraordinary figure in a fascinating time and place.

Legends of the Samurai

Godaigo takes his court to Yoshino (Southern Court). my Ron (On the Plums and Pines), a chronicle of the early ... Oda Nobunaga defeats Imagawa Yoshimoto in the battle of Okehazama. ... Ota Gy Ki (Biography of Lord Nobunaga), dies.

Legends of the Samurai

In Legends of the Samurai, Hiroaki Sato confronts both the history and the legend of the samurai, untangling the two to present an authentic picture of these legendary warriors. Through his masterful translations of original samurai tales, laws, dicta, reports, and arguments accompanied by insightful commentary, Sato chronicles the changing ethos of the Japanese warrior from the samurai's historical origins to his rise to political power. A fascinating look at Japanese history as seen through the evolution of the samurai, Legends of the Samurai stands as the ultimate authority on its subject.

The Martyrs of Japan

The episode is narrated in Ota Gyuichi's Shincho- Ko ki; see Ota Gyuichi, The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga, trans. J.S.A. Elisonas and J.P. Lamers (Leiden: Brill, 2011), 469–470. Stephen Turnbull, The Samurai: A Military History (Oxford: ...

The Martyrs of Japan

An examinination of the role that Catholic missionary orders played in the dissemination of accounts of Christian martyrdom in Japan. The author offers an overarching portrayal of the writing, printing, and circulation of books of “Japano-martyrology.”

Sources of Japanese Tradition

It has come to my attention that the lords of your entourage care nothing for such accomplishments as wielding arms or ... 340; JSAE] the assault on mount hiei and the blessings of nobunaga As this extract from The Chronicle of Lord ...

Sources of Japanese Tradition

Sources of Japanese Tradition is a best-selling classic, unrivaled for its wide selection of source readings on history, society, politics, education, philosophy, and religion in the Land of the Rising Sun. In this long-awaited second edition, the editors have revised or retranslated most of the texts in the original 1958 edition, and added a great many selections not included or translated before. They have also restructured volume 1 to span the period from the early Japanese chronicles to the end of the sixteenth century. New additions include: * readings on early and medieval Shinto and on the tea ceremony, * readings on state Buddhism and Chinese political thought influential in Japan, and * sections on women's education, medieval innovations in the uses of history, and laws and precepts of the medieval warrior houses. Together, the selections shed light on the development of Japanese civilization in its own terms, without reference to Western parallels, and will continue to assist generations of students and lay readers in understanding Japanese culture.

Lords of the Sea

Ōta Gyūichi, Nobunaga's biographer, gives a detailed account of this battle: “On 11.6, some six hundred ships from ... Yoshitaka also probably outnumbered the anti-Nobunaga coalition fleet. ... 249; The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga, pp.

Lords of the Sea

"Lords of the Sea revises our understanding of the epochal political, economic, and cultural transformations of Japan's late medieval period (1300-1600) by shifting the conventional land-based analytical framework to one centered on the perspectives of seafarers usually dismissed as 'pirates'"--Provided by publisher.

Kicho Nobunaga 2Nd Edition

This novel explores Lady Nobunaga's involvement in her warlord husband's triumph and tragedy in his endeavor to end the social upheaval of Sengoku period in 16c Japan. Following the incidents of the Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga and ...

Kicho   Nobunaga 2Nd Edition

Exploring Lady Nobunaga’s involvement in her warlord husband’s triumph and tragedy during the social upheval of 16c Japan, Rumi presents her theory to the most debated mystery in the Japaese history.

Samurai A Very Short Introduction

The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga. Edited by J. S. A. Elisonas and Jeroen Pieter Lamers. Leiden: Brill, 2011. Shapinsky, Peter D. Lords of the Sea: Pirates, Violence, and Commerce in Late Medieval Japan. Ann Arbor: Center for Japanese ...

Samurai  A Very Short Introduction

The idea of the sword-wielding samurai, beholden to a strict ethical code and trained in deadly martial arts, dominates popular conceptions of the samurai. As early as the late seventeenth century, they were heavily featured in literature, art, theater, and even comedy, from the Tale of the Heike to the kabuki retellings of the 47 Ronin. This legacy remains with us today in the legendary Akira Kurosawa films, the shoguns of HBO's Westworld, and countless renditions of samurai history in anime, manga, and video games. Acknowledging these common depictions, this book gives readers access to the real samurai as they lived, fought, and served. Much as they capture the modern imagination, the samurai commanded influence over the politics, arts, philosophy and religion of their own time, and ultimately controlled Japan from the fourteenth century until their demise in the mid-nineteenth century. On and off the battlefield, whether charging an enemy on horseback or currying favor at the imperial court, their story is one of adventures and intrigues, heroics and misdeeds, unlikely victories and devastating defeats. This book traces the samurai throughout this history, exploring their roles in watershed events such as Japan's invasions of Korea at the close of the sixteenth century and the Satsuma Rebellion of 1877. Coming alive in these accounts are the samurai, both famed and ordinary, who shaped Japanese history.

Uncharted Waters Intellectual Life in the Edo Period

His most recent work, written jointly with Jurgis Elisonas, is an annotated English translation of Ōta Gyūichi's Shinchō-Kō ki, published by brill as The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga in 2011. Kate Wildman nakai is professor emerita at ...

Uncharted Waters  Intellectual Life in the Edo Period

Intellectual life in Edo-period Japan was sometimes harmoniously productive, sometimes destructively vicious, but never stagnant. This volume, compiled in honour of Prof. W.J. Boot, offers eleven essays that explore the intellectual scene of Edo-period Japan from a variety of perspectives.

An Imperial Concubine s Tale

Gyūichi's biography of Nobunaga is entitled Shinchō-kō ki (The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga, ca. 1610); his biography of Hideyoshi is Taikōsama gunki no uchi (From the Military Record of His Lordship the Retired Imperial Regent, ...

An Imperial Concubine s Tale

Japan in the early seventeenth century was a wild place. Serial killers stalked the streets of Kyoto at night, while noblemen and women mingled freely at the imperial palace, drinking saké and watching kabuki dancing in the presence of the emperor's principal consort. Among these noblewomen was an imperial concubine named Nakanoin Nakako, who in 1609 became embroiled in a sex scandal involving both courtiers and young women in the emperor's service. As punishment, Nakako was banished to an island in the Pacific Ocean, but she never reached her destination. Instead, she was shipwrecked and spent fourteen years in a remote village on the Izu Peninsula before she was finally allowed to return to Kyoto. In 1641, Nakako began a new adventure: she entered a convent and became a Buddhist nun. Recounting the remarkable story of this resilient woman and her war-torn world, G. G. Rowley investigates aristocratic family archives, village storehouses, and the records of imperial convents. She follows the banished concubine as she endures rural exile, receives an unexpected reprieve, and rediscovers herself as the abbess of a nunnery. While unraveling Nakako's unusual tale, Rowley also reveals the little-known lives of samurai women who sacrificed themselves on the fringes of the great battles that brought an end to more than a century of civil war. Written with keen insight and genuine affection, An Imperial Concubine's Tale tells the true story of a woman's extraordinary life in seventeenth-century Japan.

Sources of Japanese Tradition

It has come to my attention that the lords ofyour entourage care nothing for such accomplishments as wielding arms or ... 340; JSAE] the assault on mount hiei and the blessings of nobunaga As this extract from The Chronicle of Lord ...

Sources of Japanese Tradition


Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture

... 561 Nigeria, Nigerians, 639 Nihongi, history of Japan, 127, 163 Nihon Shoki, Japanese chronicle, 163 Niigata, 144, ... Italian Jesuit missionary, 344 Nobunaga, see Oda Nobunaga Nogi Maresuke, Japanese general, 149 Noguchi Hideyo, ...

Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture

Containing more information on Asian culture than any other English-language reference work, Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture is the first of its kind: a set of more than thirty chronologies for all the countries of Asia—East, South, Southeast, and Central—from the Paleolithic era through 1998. Each entry is clearly dated and, unlike most chronologies found in standard history texts, the entries are complete and detailed enough to provide virtually a sequential history of the vast and rich span of Asian cultures. The contributing writers and editors have ensured the book's usefulness to general readers by identifying individuals and groups, locating places and regions, explaining events and movements, and defining unfamiliar words and concepts. The thirty-two chronologies on individual countries, in conjunction with a detailed index, allow readers to find specific information quickly and efficiently, whether they seek the date for the invention of the iron plow or gunpowder, the fall of the Han Dynasty in China, or Ho Chi Minh's declarations of Vietnamese independence. This invaluable reference culminates with three appendices: "National/Independence Days," "Scientific-Technological Achievements in Asia," and "Asia: A Chronological Overview," which provides an accessible summary of key events and developments in various fields of activity throughout the continent. The Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture features: three discrete chronologies on (1) Politics/History, (2) Art/Culture/Religion, and (3) Science/Economics/Everyday Life for each of Asia's three major cultures—China, India, and Japan—as well as a combined chronology for each of the other nations; detailed entries of thousands of historical events as well as important milestones in religion, philosophy, literature, and the arts; entries on technological developments and natural events (famines, floods, etc.) affecting the lives of ordinary people; and authoritative and accessibly written entries by a team of Asian scholars from Columbia, Harvard, and other major research universities. Beyond its detailed accounting of Asia's political history, Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture also gives full recognition to religious, intellectual, artistic, and general cultural achievements, as well as to scientific, technological, industrial, agricultural, and economic developments. Concise yet complete, it will stand as an indispensable reference work in the field of Asian studies.

Spectacular Accumulation

167–168; see also Ōta, Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga, 206–207. 13. Lamers and Elisonas translate the title of this painting as Myriad Miles of Rivers and Mountains in a previous entry in Ōta, Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga, 170, that records ...

Spectacular Accumulation

In Spectacular Accumulation, Morgan Pitelka investigates the significance of material culture and sociability in late sixteenth-century Japan, focusing in particular on the career and afterlife of Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543–1616), the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate. The story of Ieyasu illustrates the close ties between people, things, and politics and offers us insight into the role of material culture in the shift from medieval to early modern Japan and in shaping our knowledge of history. This innovative and eloquent history of a transitional age in Japan reframes the relationship between culture and politics. Like the collection of meibutsu, or "famous objects," exchanging hostages, collecting heads, and commanding massive armies were part of a strategy Pitelka calls "spectacular accumulation," which profoundly affected the creation and character of Japan's early modern polity. Pitelka uses the notion of spectacular accumulation to contextualize the acquisition of "art" within a larger complex of practices aimed at establishing governmental authority, demonstrating military dominance, reifying hierarchy, and advertising wealth. He avoids the artificial distinction between cultural history and political history, arguing that the famed cultural efflorescence of these years was not subsidiary to the landscape of political conflict, but constitutive of it. Employing a wide range of thoroughly researched visual and material evidence, including letters, diaries, historical chronicles, and art, Pitelka links the increasing violence of civil and international war to the increasing importance of samurai social rituals and cultural practices. Moving from the Ashikaga palaces of Kyoto to the tea utensil collections of Ieyasu, from the exchange of military hostages to the gift-giving rituals of Oda Nobunaga and Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Spectacular Accumulation traces Japanese military rulers' power plays over famous artworks as well as objectified human bodies.

The Last Tosa

It recounts how Araki lost his castle to Oda Nobunaga in 1579, when Matabei was two years old. ... It says that he served Oda Nobuo, also called Nobukatsu, and that, upon this lord's death, he moved to Kita no shô (now Fukui city) in ...

The Last Tosa

Iwasa Katsumochi Matabei (1578-1650) is one of the most controversial figures in Japanese art history. For more than half a century, historians have argued over Matabei's role in Japanese art: Was he, as he asserted, "The Last Tosa" (the school of painters who specialized in Yamato-e, a kind of classical courtly painting) or, as others characterized him, "The Founder of Ukiyo-e," the style of painting associated with the urban commoner class. In this highly original and convincing study, Matabei emerges as both--an artist in whose work can be seen elements of both Yamato-e and Ukiyo-e. Extending its analysis beyond the individual artist, The Last Tosa examines the trends and artistic developments of a transitional period and makes heretofore unexamined connections between the world of the aristocrat and the merchant as well as the two artistic schools that reflected their tastes. It addresses these larger issues by identifying Matabei as a member of a social group known as machishu. Excerpts from noblemen's diaries, an investigation of the etymology of machishu, and an analysis of art by its members, indicate that machishu included both commoners and gentry, thus revealing a rich tradition of egalitarianism--an important departure from the conventionally held belief that seventeenth-century Japan's urban society was rigidly stratified. The Last Tosa provides an exhaustive study of Matabei's paintings, including all his important works and key attributions. Translations of all documents available on Matabei are given, in particular his travel diary, a unique source, the only known example of such a text by a seventeeth-century classical painter. With its fusion of cultural history with political, social, and economic history, this sophisticated study will appeal to not only art historians, but also to students of history, anthropology, and culture studies interested in questions of group identity and the political uses of culture.

Buddhism and the State in Sixteenth Century Japan

Among the tremendous variety of documents contained in Oda Nobunaga Monjo no Kenkyū are personal letters, affidavits, ... The second primary source material that has been used is the Shinchö-kó Ki (“Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga”), ...

Buddhism and the State in Sixteenth Century Japan

The author reassesses the reasons for Nobunaga's attacks on the Buddhist temples and explores the long-term effects of his activities on the temples and on the relation between Buddhism and the state. Originally published in 1985. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Ninja

The chronicle of this obscure and bloody war, translated ages ago into French, provides insight into another dimension of the skill ... The Seishū Heiran-ki (ਖ਼ ूฏཚه), records the facts as follows: The lord Nobunaga sent Chasen-maru, ...

Ninja

Ninjutsu is the most renowned and misunderstood of all martial arts. The long history of ninjutstu is often murky; surrounded by mystery and legend. Here, for the first time, is an in-depth, factual look at the entire art of ninjutsu, including emergence of the ninja warriors and philosophy in feudal Japan; detailed historical events; its context in the development of other schools of martial arts; and the philosophies and exercises of the school today. Based on more than ten years of study and translation of authentic Japanese texts, including many that have never before been translated, this is the most comprehensive and accurate study on the art of ninjutsu ever written outside of Japan. This ninja book includes studies of ninjutsu history, philosophy, wisdom, and presents a wide range of information from authors, historians, chronicles and scrolls in order to foster a deep understanding of this "shadowy" art. For those who train in ninjutsu, for other martial art practitioners, for historians, and for anyone with an interest in Japanese feudal history or Japanese martial arts, The Ninja: Ancient Shadow Warriors of Japan shines a light on this enigmatic subject.

Samurai

The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga. Edited by J. S. A. Elisonas and Jeroen Pieter Lamers. Leiden: Brill, 2011. Shapinsky, Peter D. Lords of the Sea: Pirates, Violence, and Commerce in Late Medieval Japan. Ann Arbor: Center for Japanese ...

Samurai

The idea of the sword-wielding samurai, beholden to a strict ethical code and trained in deadly martial arts, dominates popular conceptions of the samurai. As early as the late seventeenth century, they were heavily featured in literature, art, theater, and even comedy, from the Tale of the Heike to the kabuki retellings of the 47 Ronin. This legacy remains with us today in the legendary Akira Kurosawa films, the shoguns of HBO's Westworld, and countless renditions of samurai history in anime, manga, and video games. Acknowledging these common depictions, this book gives readers access to the real samurai as they lived, fought, and served. Much as they capture the modern imagination, the samurai commanded influence over the politics, arts, philosophy and religion of their own time, and ultimately controlled Japan from the fourteenth century until their demise in the mid-nineteenth century. On and off the battlefield, whether charging an enemy on horseback or currying favor at the imperial court, their story is one of adventures and intrigues, heroics and misdeeds, unlikely victories and devastating defeats. This book traces the samurai throughout this history, exploring their roles in watershed events such as Japan's invasions of Korea at the close of the sixteenth century and the Satsuma Rebellion of 1877. Coming alive in these accounts are the samurai, both famed and ordinary, who shaped Japanese history.

Ninja

83; Elisonas, J.S.A. & Lamers, J.P. (Trans. and Ed.) (2011) The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga by Öta Gyūichi. (Leiden, Brill), p. 117. Kuwata, Tadachika. (Ed.) (1965). Shinchö-Kö ki. (Tokyo: Jinbutsu Öraisha), p.

Ninja

The ninja is a well-known phenomenon in Japanese military culture, a fighter who is widely regarded as the worlds greatest exponent of secret warfare. He infiltrates castles, gathers vital intelligence and wields a deadly knife in the dark. His easily recognizable image is that of a secret agent or assassin who dresses all in black, possesses almost magical martial powers, and is capable of extraordinary feats of daring. He sells his skills on a mercenary basis and when in action his unique abilities include confusing his enemies by making mystical hand gestures or by sending sharp iron stars spinning towards them.That is the popular view, but it is much exaggerated, as this exciting new book explains. Ninja: Unmasking the Myth is a revealing, fascinating and authoritative study of Japans famous secret warriors. Unlike all previous books on the subject the author, who is an expert in the subject, does not take the ninja for granted. Instead he examines the entire phenomenon in a critical manner, ranging from accounts of undercover operations during the age of Japans civil wars to the modern emergence of the superman ninja as a comic book character. The popular ninja image is shown to be the result of several influences that were combined to create the worlds greatest secret warrior.Many well-known features of the ninja tradition such as the black clothes and the iron stars are shown to be complete inventions. One important feature of the book is the use of original Japanese sources, many of which have never been translated before. As well as unknown accounts of castle attacks, assassinations and espionage they include the last great ninja manual, which reveals the spiritual and religious ideals that were believed to lie behind the ninjas arts. The book concludes with a detailed investigation of the ninja in popular culture up to the present day including movies, cartoons and theme parks.