The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas

Guest forewords by Robert Ginsberg and Roberta Kevelson, set the book in the contexts of philosophy, semiotics, and Icelandic studies to which it contributes.

The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas

The world's longest lasting republic between ancient Rome and modern Switzerland, medieval Iceland (c. 870-1262) centered its national literature, the great family sagas, around the problem of can a republic survive and do justice to its inhabitants. The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas takes a semiotic approach to six of the major sagas which depict a nation of free men, abetted by formidable women, testing conflicting legal codes and principles - pagan v. Christian, vengeance v. compromise, monarchy v. republicanism, courts v. arbitration. The sagas emerge as a body of great literature embodying profound reflections on political and legal philosophy because they do not offer simple solutions, but demonstrate the tragic choices facing legal thinkers (Njal), warriors (Gunnar), outlaws (Grettir), women (Gudrun of Laxdaela Saga), priests (Snorri of Eyrbyggja Saga), and the Icelandic community in its quest for stability and a good society. Guest forewords by Robert Ginsberg and Roberta Kevelson, set the book in the contexts of philosophy, semiotics, and Icelandic studies to which it contributes.

The Philosophy of Law

Eyrbyggja Saga—the story of the people of the Eyr Peninsula in western Iceland—presents virtually every legal problem which caused feuds during the republic. ... The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas.

The Philosophy of Law

From articles centering on the detailed and doctrinal exposition of the law to those which reside almost wholly within the realm of philosophical ethics, this volume affords comprehensive treatment to both sides of the philosophico-legal equation. Systematic and sustained coverage of the many dimensions of legal thought gives ample expression to the true breadth and depth of the philosophy of law, with coverage of: The modes of knowing and the kinds of normativity used in the law; Studies in international, constitutional, criminal, administrative, persons and property, contracts and tort law-including their historical origins and worldwide ramifications; Current legal cultures such as common law and civilian, European, and Aboriginal; Influential jurisprudents and their biographies; All influential schools and methods

Flesh and Word

A Study of the Beardless Njál in Brennu-Njáls saga Old Norse-Icelandic literature also features a very prominent beardless figure and ... 321 WILLIAM PENCAK, The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas (Amsterdam, 1995), p.

Flesh and Word

Bodies and their role in cultural discourse have been a constant focus in the humanities and social sciences in recent years, but comparatively few studies exist about Old Norse-Icelandic or early Irish literature. This study aims to redress this imbalance and presents carefully contextualised close readings of medieval texts. The chapters focus on the role of bodies in mediality discourse in various contexts: that of identity in relation to ideas about self and other, of inscribed and marked skin and of natural bodily matters such as defecation, urination and menstruation. By carefully discussing the sources in their cultural contexts, it becomes apparent that medieval Scandinavian and early Irish texts present their very own ideas about bodies and their role in structuring the narrated worlds of the texts. The study presents one of the first systematic examinations of bodies in these two literary traditions in terms of body criticism and emphasises the ingenuity and complexity of medieval texts.

The History of Medical Education in Britain

WILLIAM PENCAK The Conflict of Law and in the Icelandic Sagas Justice Amsterdam / Atlanta , GA 1995. XXI , 178 pp . with illustrations ( Value Inquiry Book Series 21 ) ISBN : 90-5183-835-2 Hfl . 60 , - / US- $ 37.50 The world's longest ...

The History of Medical Education in Britain

This volume presents new research and original synthesis on key aspects of medical instruction, theoretical and practical, from early medieval times into the present century. Academic and practical aspects are equally examined, and balanced attention is given to different sites of instruction, be it the university or the hospital.

The Philosophy of Law

Eyrbyggja Saga—the story of the people of the Eyr Peninsula in western Iceland—presents virtually every legal problem which caused feuds during the republic. ... The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas.

The Philosophy of Law

From articles centering on the detailed and doctrinal exposition of the law to those which reside almost wholly within the realm of philosophical ethics, this volume affords comprehensive treatment to both sides of the philosophico-legal equation. Systematic and sustained coverage of the many dimensions of legal thought gives ample expression to the true breadth and depth of the philosophy of law, with coverage of: The modes of knowing and the kinds of normativity used in the law; Studies in international, constitutional, criminal, administrative, persons and property, contracts and tort law-including their historical origins and worldwide ramifications; Current legal cultures such as common law and civilian, European, and Aboriginal; Influential jurisprudents and their biographies; All influential schools and methods

Old Norse Icelandic Literature

A very serviceable history for English readers is Jónas Kristjánsson's Eddas and Sagas : Iceland's Medieval Literature , trans . ... The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas ( Amsterdam and Atlanta , GA : Rodopi , 1995 ) .

Old Norse Icelandic Literature

"In the past few decades, interest in the rich and varied literature of early Scandinavia has prompted a corresponding interest in its background: its origins, social and historical context, and relationship to other medieval literatures. Until the 1980s, however, there was a distinct lack of scholarship in English that synthesized the critical trends and thinking in the field, so in 1985 Carol J. Clover and John Lindow brought together several of the most distinguished Old Norse scholars to contribute essays for a collection that would finally provide a comprehensive guide to the major genres of Old Norse-Icelandic literature." "The contributors summarize and comment on scholarly work in the major branches of the field: eddic and skaldic poetry, family and kings' sagas, courtly writing, and mythology. Their essays, each with a full bibliography, make up this vital survey of Old Norse literature in English - a basic reference work that has stimulated much research and helped to open up the field to a wider academic readership." "This volume has become an essential text for instructors, and now, twenty years after its first appearance, it is being republished as part of the Medieval Academy Reprints for Teaching (MART) series with a new preface that discusses more recent contributions to the field."

The Far Traveler

the best introduction to the sagas is Gisli SigurSsson's The Medieval Icelandic Saga and Oral Tradition (2004). ... Iceland the Enchanted (1995) William Pencak, The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas (1995) Margaret ...

The Far Traveler

The remarkable story of Gudrid, the female explorer who sailed from Iceland to the New World a millennium ago. Five hundred years before Columbus, a Viking woman named Gudrid sailed off the edge of the known world. She landed in the New World and lived there for three years, giving birth to a baby before sailing home. Or so the Icelandic sagas say. Even after archaeologists found a Viking longhouse in Newfoundland, no one believed that the details of Gudrid’s story were true. Then, in 2001, a team of scientists discovered what may have been this pioneering woman’s last house, buried under a hay field in Iceland, just where the epic tales suggest it could be. Joining scientists experimenting with cutting-edge technology and the latest archaeological techniques, and tracing Gudrid’s steps on land and in the sagas, The Far Traveler reconstructs a life that spanned—and expanded—the bounds of the then-known world. It also sheds new light on the society that gave rise to a woman even more extraordinary than legend has painted her, and illuminates the reasons for its collapse.

Narrating Law and Laws of Narration in Medieval Scandinavia

A Reading of Njáls saga. Oxford. Pencak, William (1995): The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas. Amsterdam/Atlanta. Tirosh, Yoav (2014): Víga-Njáll: A New Approach Toward Njáls saga. In: Scandinavian Studies, 86, pp.

Narrating Law and Laws of Narration in Medieval Scandinavia

Disputes lie at the heart of the sagas. Consequently, literary texts have been treated as sources of legal practice – narrations of law – while the sagas themselves and the handling of legal matters by the figures adhere to ‘laws of narration’. The volume addresses this intricate relationship between literature and social practice from the perspective of historians as well as philologists. The contributions focus not only on disputes and their solution in saga literature, but also on the representation of law and its history in sagas and Latin historiography from Scandinavia as well as the representation of laws and norms in mythological texts. They demonstrate that narrations of law provide an indispensable insight into legal culture and its connection to a wider framework of social norms, adjusting the impression given by the laws. The philological approaches underline that the narrative texts also have an agenda of their own when it comes to their representation of law, providing a mirror of conduct, criticising inequity, reinforcing the political and juridical position of kings or negotiating norms in mythological texts. Altogether, the volume underlines the unifying force exerted by a common fiction of law beyond its letter.

The A to Z of Iceland

The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1995. See, Klaus von. Altordische Rechtswórter: Philologische Studien zur Rechtsauffassung und Rechtsgesinn und der Germanen. Tübingen, Germany: Niemeyer, 1964.

The A to Z of Iceland

The A to Z of Iceland traces Iceland's history and provides a compass for the direction the country is heading. This is done through its chronology, introductory essays, appendixes, map, bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on important persons, places, events, and institutions and significant political, economic, social, and cultural aspects.

Historical Dictionary of Iceland

The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1995. See, Klaus von. Altordische Rechtswo'rter: Philologische Studien zur Rechtsaujfassung und Rechtsgesinn und der Germanen. Tubingen, Germany: Niemeyer, 1964.

Historical Dictionary of Iceland

While Iceland is the second largest inhabited island in Europe, with only 313,000 inhabitants in 2007, the Icelanders form one of the smallest independent nations in the world. Around two-thirds of the population lives in the capital, Reykjav'k, and its suburbs, while the rest is spread around the inhabitable area of the country. Until fairly recently the Icelandic nation was unusually homogeneous, both in cultural and religious terms; in 1981, around 98 percent of the nation was born in Iceland and 96 percent belonged to the Lutheran state church or other Lutheran religious sects. In 2007, these numbers were down to 89 and 86 percent respectively, reflecting the rapidly growing multicultural nature of Icelandic society. The second edition of the Historical Dictionary of Iceland traces Iceland's history and provides a compass for the direction the country is heading. This is done through its chronology, introductory essays, appendixes, map, bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on important persons, places, events, and institutions and significant political, economic, social, and cultural aspects.

Historical Dictionary of Iceland

The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1995. See, Klaus von. Almordische Rechtsworter: Philologische Studien zur Rechtsauffassung and Rechtsgesinn und der Germanen. Tübingen: Niemeyer, 1964.

Historical Dictionary of Iceland

This third edition of Historical Dictionary of Iceland contains a chronology, an introduction, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 200 cross-referenced entries on important personalities, politics, economy, foreign relations, religion, and culture.

Images in Law

83, 3/4, 1991) and The American Journal of Semiotics (vol. 12, 1995 [98]), History, Signing In: Studies in History and Semiotics (Peter Lang, 1993), The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas (Rodopi ...

Images in Law

What does 'the law' look like? While numerous attempts have been made to examine law and legal action in terms of its language, little has yet been written that considers how visual images of the law influence its interpretation and execution in ways not discernible from written texts. This groundbreaking collection focuses on images in law, featuring contributions that show and discuss the perception of the legal universe on a theoretical basis or when dealing with visual semiotics (dress, ceremony, technology, etc.). It also examines 'language in action', analyzing jury instructions, police directives, and how imagery is used in conjunction with contentious social and political issues within a country, such as the image of family in Ireland or the image of racism in France.

Moral Conflicts of Organ Retrieval

A volume in Natural Law Studies 21. William Pencak, The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas 22. Samuel M. Natale and Brian M. Rothschild, Editors, Values, Work, Education: The Meanings of Work 23.

Moral Conflicts of Organ Retrieval

This book addresses ethical conflicts arising from saving the lives of patients who need a transplant while treating living and dead donors, organ sellers, animals, and embryos with proper moral regard. Our challenge is to develop a better world in the light of debatable values and uncertain consequences.

Amsterdamer Beitr ge Zur lteren Germanistik

WILLIAM PENCAK The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas Amsterdam / Atlanta , GA 1995. XXI , 178 pp . with illustrations ( Value Inquiry Book Series 21 ) ISBN : 90-5183-835-2 Hfl . 60 , - / US- $ 37.50 The world's longest ...

Amsterdamer Beitr  ge Zur   lteren Germanistik


Torture and Brutality in Medieval Literature

45 William Pencak, The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1995), p. 6. 46 John Frankis, 'From Saint's Life to Saga: The Fatal Walk of Alfred Ætheling, Saint Amphibalus and the Viking Broðir', ...

Torture and Brutality in Medieval Literature

A new look at the way in which medieval European literature depicts torture and brutality.

Confidential Relationships

A volume in Natural Law Studies 21 . William Pencak , The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas 22 . Samuel M. Natale and Brian M. Rothschild , Editors , Values , Work , Education : The Meanings of Work 23.

Confidential Relationships

This book focuses the collective attention of psychotherapists, the legal community, social scientists, and ethicists on the moral, legal, and clinical problems of confidentiality in psychotherapeutic practice. By providing timely and important interdisciplinary contributions, the book opens the way to understanding, if not resolving, the conflicting interests and values at stake in the debate on confidentiality.

The Reopening of the American Mind

A volume in Natural Law Studies . 21. William Pencak , The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas . 22. Samuel M. Natale and Brian M. Rothschild , Editors , Values , Work , Education : The Meanings of Work . 23.

The Reopening of the American Mind

The Reopening of the American Mind: On Skepticism and Constitutionalism explores the connection of moderate skepticism with attachment to constitutionalism through the thought of five writers. The features of this skepticism were concisely delineated by James Madison in the 37th Federalist as a recognition of the complexity of political matters, the limitations of human reason, and the shortcomings of language. The position was first articulated by Cicero who connected it with the idea of a mixed or republican constitution developed by trial and error over generations. Cicero was influential in the world of David Hume, Edmund Burke, and Madison. The skeptical/constitutional connection found its most articulate recent advocate in Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter and underlay his advocacy of judicial restraint. Current events have revived interest in the primacy of the legislative branch in balancing interests and rights, in the States as laboratories for democracy, and in an experimental approach to the solution of social problems in what might be called a reopening of the American mind. The five central chapters explore the skeptical/constitutional connection and the spirit of moderation in these political thinkers. Without an appreciation of this tradition of avoiding dogmatism, people will continue to demand simple answers to complex problems. The book is not, however, primarily a tract for the times but a reflection on the on-going search for a more civil world.

Values Violence and Our Future

A volume in Natural Law Studies . 21. William Pencak , The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas . 22. Samuel M. Natate and Brian M. Rothschild , Editors , Values , Work , Education : The Meanings of Work . 23.

Values  Violence  and Our Future

This book identifies the character of human predators who violate others or themselves. The contagion of violence infects values that affect behavior. But we may call upon the intrinsic values of love, compassion, and creativity to oppose such violence. The book boldly argues for a renewal of the spiritual energy that gave rise to civilization.

Genes and Morality

A volume in Natural Law Studies . 21. William Pencak , The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas . 22. Samuel M. Natale and Brian M. Rothschild , Editors , Values , Work , Education : The Meanings of Work . 23.

Genes and Morality

Most public discussion has focused on those effects of genetic research that are considered in some way unwanted or unpleasant. For example, there has been much debate concerning the risks and the ethical appropriateness of genetic screening, gene therapy, and agricultural applications based on genetic techniques. It often claimed that genetic research may cause new problems such as genetic discrimination, stigmatization, environmental risks, or mistreatment of animals. Genes and Morality: New Essays adopts a critical attitude toward genetic research, on both a theoretical and a practical level. It presents some of the most important problems in the ethics of genetic engineering, including the questions of genetic health and disease, genetic testing, responsibility for health, patenting non-human and human life, and problems related to the disclosure of genetic information. The aim of the book is to focus on real ethical and conceptual issues. Consider, for instance, the concept of genetic disease. As one of the contributors, Ingmar Pörn, writes, fear of genetic disease, or anxiety, is not itself a disease any more than fear of becoming unemployed is a disease. Alleviating such emotions is not a medical task to be discharged by drug therapy. The book also examines the philosophical foundations of these issues by discussing the most influential bioethical theories of today, including utilitarianism and principlism.

Collective Responsibility

A volume in Natural Law Studies . 21. William Pencak , The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas . 22. Samuel M. Natale and Brian M. Rothschild , Editors , Values , Work , Education : The Meanings of Work . 23.

Collective Responsibility

Groups of people are commonly said to be collectively responsible for what has happened. Sometimes the groups claimed to be responsible are vast in size, as when collective responsibility is ascribed to the class of all Americans or the class of all white males. In this book the concept of collective responsibility is analyzed. It is examined not only in the light of what philosophical proponents (such as Cooper, Held, Bates, French, Swinburne, and May) have said about it, but a genuine attempt is made to make sense of what ordinary people say about responsibility when it is ascribed to groups of people. Accordingly, it is distinguished from related concepts such as shared responsibility and moral taint. Parallels are examined between the actions of an individual and the actions of a group or collective, parallels which seem to make ascriptions of collective responsibility more plausible. Some philosophers oppose collective responsibility and argue for an individualist type of position; in this regard the positions of Lewis and Sverdlik are critically examined. The final chapter contains the author's own position, a position which affirms that collective responsibility is possible but which also preserves some of the central intuitions of the individualist.