The Constant Gardener

The Constant Gardener

'The book breathes life, anger and excitement' Observer Tessa Quayle, a brilliant and beautiful young social activist, has been found brutally murdered by Lake Turkana in Nairobi. The rumours are that she was faithless, careless, but her husband Justin, a reserved, garden-loving British diplomat, refuses to believe them. As he sets out to discover what really happened to Tessa, he unearths a conspiracy more disturbing, and more deadly, than he could ever have imagined. A blistering exposé of global corruption, The Constant Gardener is also the moving portrayal of a man searching for justice for the woman he has barely had time to love. 'A cracking thriller' Economist

The Constant Gardener by John le Carré (Book Analysis)

Detailed Summary, Analysis and Reading Guide

The Constant Gardener by John le Carré (Book Analysis)

Unlock the more straightforward side of The Constant Gardener with this concise and insightful summary and analysis! This engaging summary presents an analysis of The Constant Gardener by John le Carré, which follows a British diplomat in Kenya as he comes to terms with the shocking murder of his wife Tessa. Before her untimely death, Tessa was investigating the abuses of a large pharmaceutical company in the country, which was knowingly using African citizens as guinea pigs for a new drug. Her murder reveals not only the crimes perpetrated by big businesses in Africa, but also the complicity of Western governments, who are all too happy to turn a blind eye if it suits their own interests. John le Carré is an internationally renowned writer of spy novels. His best-known works include The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, The Night Manager and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. Find out everything you need to know about The Constant Gardener in a fraction of the time! This in-depth and informative reading guide brings you: • A complete plot summary • Character studies • Key themes and symbols • Questions for further reflection Why choose BrightSummaries.com? Available in print and digital format, our publications are designed to accompany you on your reading journey. The clear and concise style makes for easy understanding, providing the perfect opportunity to improve your literary knowledge in no time. See the very best of literature in a whole new light with BrightSummaries.com!

Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2009

Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2009

Nobody has been more important in telling Americans why we should love film than Roger Ebert. --Michael Shamberg, Editor and Publisher Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Roger Ebert presents more than 650 full-length critical movie reviews, along with interviews, essays, tributes, film festival reports, and Q and As from Questions for the Movie Answer Man. Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2009 collects more than two years' worth of his engaging film critiques. From Bee Movie to Darfur Now to No Country for Old Men, and from Juno to Persepolis to La Vie en Rose, Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2009 includes every review Ebert has written from January 2006 to June 2008. Also included in the Yearbook, which boasts 65 percent new content, are: * Interviews with newsmakers, such as Juno director Jason Reitman and Jerry Seinfeld, a touching tribute to Deborah Kerr, and an emotional letter of appreciation to Werner Herzog. * Essays on film issues, and tributes to actors and directors who died during the year. * Daily film festival reports from Cannes, Toronto, Sundance, and Telluride. * All-new questions and answers from his Questions for the Movie Answer Man columns.

Rumble and Crash

Crises of Capitalism in Contemporary Film

Rumble and Crash

Analyzes six films as allegories of capitalism’s precarious state in the early twenty-first century. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, as the contradictions of capitalism became more apparent than at any other time since the 1920s, numerous films gave allegorical form to the crises of contemporary capitalism. Some films were overtly political in nature, while others refracted the vicissitudes of capital in stories that were not, on the surface, explicitly political. Rumble and Crash examines six particularly rich and thought-provoking films in this vein. These films, Milo Sweedler argues, give narrative and audiovisual form to the increasingly pervasive sense that the economic system we have known and accepted as inevitable and ubiquitous is in fact riddled with self-destructive flaws. Analyzing four movies from before the global financial crisis of 2008 and two that allegorize the financial meltdown itself, Sweedler explores how cinema responded to one of the defining crises of our time. Films examined include Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men (2006), Stephen Gaghan’s Syriana(2005), Fernando Meirelles’s The Constant Gardener (2005), Spike Lee’s Inside Man (2006), Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street (2013), and Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine (2013). “Milo Sweedler has produced what are surely the most original, provocative, and downright dazzling readings of a handful of socially significant and potent films released during the tumultuous years from 2005 to 2013. This is a fine book.” — David Desser, former editor, Cinema Journal

The Looking Glass War

The Looking Glass War

The Department has faded since the war, effectively mothballed, without agents or resources. But now, with intelligence of a possible missile threat, it again has a mission. This is a chance to prove its influence to those at the Circus, like George Smiley, who think the Department's time has passed. The opportunity to reclaim former glory cannot be missed - even though it means putting men's lives at desperate risk on foreign soil. THE LOOKING GLASS WAR ia a gripping story of the amorality of espionage - unflinching in its depiction of the men involved, who are as much full of vanity and fear as of selflessness and courage.

How Novels Work

How Novels Work

Never has contemporary fiction been more widely discussed and passionately analysed; recent years have seen a huge growth in the number of reading groups and in the interest of a non-academic readership in the discussion of how novels work. Drawing on his weekly Guardian column, 'Elements of Fiction', John Mullan examines novels mostly of the last ten years, many of which have become firm favourites with reading groups. He reveals the rich resources of novelistic technique, setting recent fiction alongside classics of the past. Nick Hornby's adoption of a female narrator is compared to Daniel Defoe's; Ian McEwan's use of weather is set against Austen's and Hardy's; Carole Shield's chapter divisions are likened to Fanny Burney's. Each section shows how some basic element of fiction is used. Some topics (like plot, dialogue, or location) will appear familiar to most novel readers; others (metanarrative, prolepsis, amplification) will open readers' eyes to new ways of understanding and appreciating the writer's craft. How Novels Work explains how the pleasures of novel reading often come from the formal ingenuity of the novelist. It is an entertaining and stimulating exploration of that ingenuity. Addressed to anyone who is interested in the close reading of fiction, it makes visible techniques and effects we are often only half-aware of as we read. It shows that literary criticism is something that all fiction enthusiasts can do. Contemporary novels discussed include: Monica Ali's Brick Lane; Martin Amis's Money; Margaret Atwood's The Blind Assassin; A.S. Byatt's Possession; Jonathan Coe's The Rotters' Club; J.M. Coetzee's Disgrace; Michael Cunningham's The Hours; Don DeLillo's Underworld; Michel Faber's The Crimson Petal and the White; Ian Fleming's From Russia with Love; Jonathan Franzen's The Corrections; Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time; Patricia Highsmith's Ripley under Ground; Alan Hollinghurst's The Spell; Nick Hornby's How to Be Good; Ian McEwan's Atonement; John le Carré's The Constant Gardener; Andrea Levy's Small Island; David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas; Andrew O'Hagan's Personality; Orhan Pamuk's My Name Is Red; Ann Patchett's Bel Canto; Ruth Rendell's Adam and Eve and Pinch Me; Philip Roth's The Human Stain; Jonathan Safran Foer's Everything Is Illuminated; Carol Shields's Unless; Zadie Smith's White Teeth; Muriel Spark's Aiding and Abetting; Graham Swift's Last Orders; Donna Tartt's The Secret History; William Trevor's The Hill Bachelors; and Richard Yates's Revolutionary Road .

A Most Wanted Man

A Novel

A Most Wanted Man

Smuggled into Hamburg, Issa, a young Russian man, forms an alliance with Annabel, a civil rights lawyer, and Tommy Brue, scion of a failing British bank, as they become victims of rival intelligence operations in the War on Terror.

The Russia House

A Novel

The Russia House

World powers clash for dominance as a beautiful Russian woman carries out a staggering mission and a derelict English publisher becomes the unlikely recipient of the Soviet Union's top defense secret. Reprint. 12,500 first printing.

Call for the Dead

Call for the Dead

Featuring an introduction by the author, this is a paperback reissue of the debut novel that introduces one of the most popular characters in espionage fiction: George Smiley.