The Constant Gardener

The Constant Gardener

'The book breathes life, anger and excitement' Observer Tessa Quayle, a brilliant and beautiful young social activist, has been found brutally murdered by Lake Turkana in Nairobi. The rumours are that she was faithless, careless, but her husband Justin, a reserved, garden-loving British diplomat, refuses to believe them. As he sets out to discover what really happened to Tessa, he unearths a conspiracy more disturbing, and more deadly, than he could ever have imagined. A blistering exposé of global corruption, The Constant Gardener is also the moving portrayal of a man searching for justice for the woman he has barely had time to love. 'A cracking thriller' Economist

The Constant Gardener

The Constant Gardener

Covering an enormous range of subjects, this essential guide to your garden describes how to cultivate and care for your favourite plants; how to grow fruit trees, lay a lawn or design a 'potager'. The Constant Gardener reveals the fascinating history of the rose, discusses pruning techniques, tells you how to create nutrient-rich compost, pave a path or lay a hedge. It is packed with handy hints, recipes and stories.

The Constant Gardener by John le Carré (Book Analysis)

Detailed Summary, Analysis and Reading Guide

The Constant Gardener by John le Carré (Book Analysis)

Unlock the more straightforward side of The Constant Gardener with this concise and insightful summary and analysis! This engaging summary presents an analysis of The Constant Gardener by John le Carré, which follows a British diplomat in Kenya as he comes to terms with the shocking murder of his wife Tessa. Before her untimely death, Tessa was investigating the abuses of a large pharmaceutical company in the country, which was knowingly using African citizens as guinea pigs for a new drug. Her murder reveals not only the crimes perpetrated by big businesses in Africa, but also the complicity of Western governments, who are all too happy to turn a blind eye if it suits their own interests. John le Carré is an internationally renowned writer of spy novels. His best-known works include The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, The Night Manager and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. Find out everything you need to know about The Constant Gardener in a fraction of the time! This in-depth and informative reading guide brings you: • A complete plot summary • Character studies • Key themes and symbols • Questions for further reflection Why choose BrightSummaries.com? Available in print and digital format, our publications are designed to accompany you on your reading journey. The clear and concise style makes for easy understanding, providing the perfect opportunity to improve your literary knowledge in no time. See the very best of literature in a whole new light with BrightSummaries.com!

The Constant Gardner

The Shooting Script

The Constant Gardner

Exclusive to this Newmarket Shooting Script® book are the film's award-winning screenplay by Jeffrey Caine, a foreword by John le CarrÉ written specially for this official edition, along with a perceptive introduction by film critic Kenneth Turan, a color photo section, and in-depth notes on the production of the film, featuring behind-the-scenes comments from the actors, the writers, Oscar®-nominated director Fernando Meirelles (City of God), and his international filmmaking team, including observations about shooting in Kenya and the worldwide effects of the pharmaceutical industry. Two-time Academy Award® nominee Ralph Fiennes and Rachel Weisz head the cast of the highly acclaimed thriller filmed on location in Berlin, London, and Nairobi and numerous other parts of Kenya. In a remote area of northern Kenya, the region's most dedicated activist, the brilliant and passionate Tessa Quayle (Rachel Weisz), has been found brutally murdered. Haunted by remorse and jarred by rumors of his wife's infidelities, mild-mannered British diplomat and Tessa's widower, Justin Quayle (Ralph Fiennes), surprises himself by plunging headlong into a dangerous odyssey. His eyes are soon opened to a vast conspiracy at once deadly and commonplace, one that has claimed innocent lives—and is about to put his own at risk.

Out of Time

Desire in Atemporal Cinema

Out of Time

A new temporal aesthetic in films such as "Memento," "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind," "2046," and "The Hangover."

African Film and Literature

Adapting Violence to the Screen

African Film and Literature

Analyzing a range of South African and West African films inspired by African and non-African literature, Lindiwe Dovey identifies a specific trend in contemporary African filmmaking-one in which filmmakers are using the embodied audiovisual medium of film to offer a critique of physical and psychological violence. Against a detailed history of the medium's savage introduction and exploitation by colonial powers in two very different African contexts, Dovey examines the complex ways in which African filmmakers are preserving, mediating, and critiquing their own cultures while seeking a united vision of the future. More than merely representing socio-cultural realities in Africa, these films engage with issues of colonialism and postcolonialism, "updating" both the history and the literature they adapt to address contemporary audiences in Africa and elsewhere. Through this deliberate and radical re-historicization of texts and realities, Dovey argues that African filmmakers have developed a method of filmmaking that is altogether distinct from European and American forms of adaptation.

Hollywood’s Africa after 1994

Hollywood’s Africa after 1994

Hollywood’s Africa after 1994 investigates Hollywood’s colonial film legacy in the postapartheid era, and contemplates what has changed in the West’s representations of Africa. How do we read twenty-first-century projections of human rights issues—child soldiers, genocide, the exploitation of the poor by multinational corporations, dictatorial rule, truth and reconciliation—within the contexts of celebrity humanitarianism, “new” military humanitarianism, and Western support for regime change in Africa and beyond? A number of films after 1994, such as Black Hawk Down, Hotel Rwanda, Blood Diamond, The Last King of Scotland, The Constant Gardener, Shake Hands with the Devil, Tears of the Sun, and District 9, construct explicit and implicit arguments about the effects of Western intervention in Africa. Do the emphases on human rights in the films offer a poignant expression of our shared humanity? Do they echo the colonial tropes of former “civilizing missions?” Or do human rights violations operate as yet another mine of sensational images for Hollywood’s spectacular storytelling? The volume provides analyses by academics and activists in the fields of African studies, English, film and media studies, international relations, and sociology across continents. This thoughtful and highly engaging book is a valuable resource for those who seek new and varied approaches to films about Africa. Contributors Harry Garuba and Natasha Himmelman Margaret R. Higonnet, with Ethel R. Higgonet Joyce B. Ashuntantang Kenneth W. Harrow Christopher Odhiambo Ricardo Guthrie Clifford T. Manlove Earl Conteh-Morgan Bennetta Jules-Rosette, J. R. Osborn, and Lea Marie Ruiz-Ade Christopher Garland Kimberly Nichele Brown Jane Bryce Iyunolu Osagie Dayna Oscherwitz

We Are Joseph

How African-Americans Can Unlock Ultimate Success, Find True Fulfillment, and Bring Healing to Their People

We Are Joseph

We Are Joseph a powerful historic book written by Jean Louis Tailly seeks to fi nd a lasting solution to the ongoing crises in Africa. The book brings to life the hardships, humiliation, and expected triumphs of broken family relationships, poverty, hostility, and horrors associated with slavery. We Are Joseph explores the good that can come out of slavery. The story of Joseph forms the backdrop of this book highlighting Josephs painful separation from his family, his life as a slave in a foreign land, his eventual rise to power and reconciliation with his brothers. It describes the striking similarities between Josephs experience and the African-American experience in slavery. Tailly looks at slavery not from the human perspective but from a godly perspective. We Are Joseph is about the history, identity, and destiny of African- Americans. It is a history full of victories and defeats but more importantly, a history rich with lessons that can help build a brighter future for generations to come. The book also answers the question of why African-Americans were brought to America and gives compelling reasons why they are Gods chosen instrument to unify the Africans, bring them peace, stability, and prosperity, and repair the psychological, sociological, and economical damages caused by the Atlantic slave trade.

Framing Africa

Portrayals of a Continent in Contemporary Mainstream Cinema

Framing Africa

The first decade of the 21st century has seen a proliferation of North American and European films that focus on African politics and society. While once the continent was the setting for narratives of heroic ascendancy over self (The African Queen, 1951; The Snows of Kilimanjaro, 1952), military odds (Zulu, 1964; Khartoum, 1966) and nature (Mogambo, 1953; Hatari!,1962; Born Free, 1966; The Last Safari, 1967), this new wave of films portrays a continent blighted by transnational corruption (The Constant Gardener, 2005), genocide (Hotel Rwanda, 2004; Shooting Dogs, 2006), 'failed states' (Black Hawk Down, 2001), illicit transnational commerce (Blood Diamond, 2006) and the unfulfilled promises of decolonization (The Last King of Scotland, 2006). Conversely, where once Apartheid South Africa was a brutal foil for the romance of East Africa (Cry Freedom, 1987; A Dry White Season, 1989), South Africa now serves as a redeemed contrast to the rest of the continent (Red Dust, 2004; Invictus, 2009). Writing from the perspective of long-term engagement with the contexts in which the films are set, anthropologists and historians reflect on these films and assess the contemporary place Africa holds in the North American and European cinematic imagination.

A Spectacle of Dust

The Autobiography

A Spectacle of Dust

Vibrant and candid memoirs of the late, great British character actor, Pete Postlethwaite. After training as a teacher, Pete Postlethwaite started his acting career at the Liverpool Everyman Theatre where his colleagues included Bill Nighy, Jonathan Pryce, Antony Sher and Julie Walters. After routine early appearances in small parts for television programmes such as THE PROFESSIONALS, Postlethwaite's first success came with the acclaimed British film DISTANT VOICES, STILL LIVES in 1988. He then received an Academy Award nomination for his role in THE NAME OF THE FATHER in 1993. His performance as the mysterious lawyer "Kobayashi" in THE USUAL SUSPECTS is well-known, and he appeared in many successful films including ALIEN 3, BRASSED OFF, THE SHIPPING NEWS, THE CONSTANT GARDENER, as Friar Lawrence in Baz Luhrmann's ROMEO + JULIET, and in INCEPTION with Leonardo diCaprio. Pete Postlethwaite was one of the best-loved and widely admired performers on stage, TV (SHARPE, THE SINS) and in cinema. In THE ART OF DISCWORLD, Terry Pratchett said that he had always imagined Sam Vimes as 'a younger, slightly bulkier version of Pete Postlethwaite', while Steven Spielberg called him 'the best actor in the world', about which Postlethwaite said: 'I'm sure what Spielberg actually said was, "the thing about Pete is that he thinks he's the best actor in the world."' This is the story of a diverse and multi-talented actor's eventful life, told in his own candid and vibrant words.