The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World seventh fourth Centuries BCE

These papers demonstrate the importance of archaeological context in the study of Greek pottery.

The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World  seventh fourth Centuries BCE

These papers demonstrate the importance of archaeological context in the study of Greek pottery. Topics include the reception and consumption of Greek pottery in various Italic societies, the archaeological interpretation of Attic pottery in Greek contexts, questions of trade and commissions, and the birth of red-figured pottery in Sioily. Four papers in English, two in Italian.

Athens Etruria and the Many Lives of Greek Figured Pottery

“A Complex Approach to Etruscan Black Figure Vase Painting.” Mediterranea 8:33–82. ———, ed. 2012a. The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (SeventhFourth Centuries B.C.E.). Oxford: Archaeopress. ———. 2012b.

Athens  Etruria  and the Many Lives of Greek Figured Pottery

A lucrative trade in Athenian pottery flourished from the early sixth until the late fifth century B.C.E., finding an eager market in Etruria. Most studies of these painted vases focus on the artistry and worldview of the Greeks who made them, but Sheramy D. Bundrick shifts attention to their Etruscan customers, ancient trade networks, and archaeological contexts. Thousands of Greek painted vases have emerged from excavations of tombs, sanctuaries, and settlements throughout Etruria, from southern coastal centers to northern communities in the Po Valley. Using documented archaeological assemblages, especially from tombs in southern Etruria, Bundrick challenges the widely held assumption that Etruscans were hellenized through Greek imports. She marshals evidence to show that Etruscan consumers purposefully selected figured pottery that harmonized with their own local needs and customs, so much so that the vases are better described as etruscanized. Athenian ceramic workers, she contends, learned from traders which shapes and imagery sold best to the Etruscans and employed a variety of strategies to maximize artistry, output, and profit.

The Transformation of Athens

“Sex and the Athenian Woman: A Contextual Analysis of Erotic Vase-Paintings from Attic Graves of the 5th Century bc.” In The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (SeventhFourth Centuries bce), ...

The Transformation of Athens

How remarkable changes in ancient Greek pottery reveal the transformation of classical Greek culture Why did soldiers stop fighting, athletes stop competing, and lovers stop having graphic sex in classical Greek art? The scenes depicted on Athenian pottery of the mid-fifth century BC are very different from those of the late sixth century. Did Greek potters have a different world to see—or did they come to see the world differently? In this lavishly illustrated and engagingly written book, Robin Osborne argues that these remarkable changes are the best evidence for the shifting nature of classical Greek culture. Osborne examines the thousands of surviving Athenian red-figure pots painted between 520 and 440 BC and describes the changing depictions of soldiers and athletes, drinking parties and religious occasions, sexual relations, and scenes of daily life. He shows that it was not changes in each activity that determined how the world was shown, but changes in values and aesthetics. By demonstrating that changes in artistic style involve choices about what aspects of the world we decide to represent as well as how to represent them, this book rewrites the history of Greek art. By showing that Greeks came to see the world differently over the span of less than a century, it reassesses the history of classical Greece and of Athenian democracy. And by questioning whether art reflects or produces social and political change, it provokes a fresh examination of the role of images in an ever-evolving world.

Cycladic Archaeology and Research New Approaches and Discoveries

Red-Figure Pottery from Minoa on Amorgos, in D. Paleothodoros (ed) The Context of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World, (SeventhFourth Centuries BC): 41-79. Oxford: Archeopress. Marangou, L. 1982.

Cycladic Archaeology and Research  New Approaches and Discoveries

Recent excavations and new theoretical approaches are changing our view of the Cyclades. This volume aims to share these recent developments with a broader, international audience. Essays have been carefully selected as representing some of the most important recent work and include significant previously-unpublished material.

Peoples in the Black Sea Region from the Archaic to the Roman Period

Early Sixth-Century Directional Trade: The Evidence of Attic Black-Figured Pottery. In D. Paleothodoros (ed.), The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (Seventh-Fourth Centuries BCE), Oxford, 5-20.

Peoples in the Black Sea Region from the Archaic to the Roman Period

Contributions to this volume, covering all shores of the Black Sea, draw on a mix of archaeological evidence, epigraphy and written sources to explore the activities and characteristics of those that inhabited or colonised the Black Sea area, as well as those that visited, acted in, or influenced the region, from the archaic to Roman periods.

The Regional Production of Red Figure Pottery

The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (Seventh-Fourth Centuries BCE), Oxford, 21-39. Peacock, D. P. S. 1982 Pottery in the Roman World: An Ethnoarchaeological Approach, London/ New York.

The Regional Production of Red Figure Pottery

In the latter part of the fifth century BC, regional red-figure productions were established outside Attica in regional Greece and in the western Mediterranean, propelled by the impact of the art of Attic vase painting. This collection of papers addresses key issues posed by these production centres. Why did they emerge? To what degree was their inception prompted by the emigration of Attic craftsmen in the context of the weakened Attic pottery market at the onset of the Peloponnesian War? How did Attic vase painting influence already existing traditions, and what was selected, adopted or adapted at the receiving end? Who was using red-figure in mainland Greece and Italy, and what were its particular functions in the local cultures? These and more questions are addressed here with the presentation not only of syntheses, but also primary publication of much newly discovered material. Regional production centres covered include those of Euboea, Boeotia, Corinth, Laconia, Macedonia, Ambracia, Lucania, Apulia, Sicily, Locri and Etruria.

The Frame in Classical Art

(2012) The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (SeventhFourth Centuries BCE). Oxford. Pallas, D. (1977) Les monuments paléochrétiens de Gr`ece découverts de 1959 `a 1973. Sussidi allo Studio della Antichit`a ...

The Frame in Classical Art

This book reveals how 'marginal' aspects of Graeco-Roman art play a fundamental role in shaping and interrogating ancient and modern visual culture.

Children and Childhood in Classical Athens

“Sex and the Athenian Woman: A Contextual Analysis of Erotic VasePaintings from Attic Graves of the 5th Century BC.” In The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (SeventhFourth Centuries BCE), ...

Children and Childhood in Classical Athens

A thoroughly revised and updated edition of Mark Golden’s groundbreaking study of childhood in ancient Greece. First published in 1990, Children and Childhood in Classical Athens was the first book in English to explore the lives of children in ancient Athens. Drawing on literary, artistic, and archaeological sources as well as on comparative studies of family history, Mark Golden offers a vivid portrait of the public and private lives of children from about 500 to 300 B.C. Golden discusses how the Athenians viewed children and childhood, describes everyday activities of children at home and in the community, and explores the differences in the social lives of boys and girls. He details the complex bonds among children, parents, siblings, and household slaves, and he shows how a growing child’s changing roles often led to conflict between the demands of family and the demands of community. In this thoroughly revised edition, Golden places particular emphasis on the problem of identifying change over time and the relationship of children to adults. He also explores three dominant topics in the recent historiography of childhood: the agency of children, the archaeology of childhood, and representations of children in art. The book includes a completely new final chapter, text and notes rewritten throughout to incorporate evidence and scholarship that has appeared over the past twenty-five years, and an index of ancient sources.

Wonders Lost and Found A Celebration of the Archaeological Work of Professor Michael Vickers

Black and Plain Pottery of the 6th, 5th and the 4th Centuries B.C. Princeton. Šešelj, L. 2009. ... The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the ancient Mediterranean world (seventh-fourth centuries BCE): 93100. Oxford.

Wonders Lost and Found  A Celebration of the Archaeological Work of Professor Michael Vickers

Twenty-one contributions, written by friends and colleagues, reflect the wide interests of Professor Michael Vickers; from the Aegean Bronze Age to the use made of archaeology by dictators in the modern age. Seven contributions relate to Georgia, where the Professor has worked most recently, and made his home.

Athenian Potters and Painters III

The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (SeventhFourth Centuries BCE) (2012), esp. 73–76. 53 Supra n. 41. 27 The Attic Phiale in Context. The Late Archaic Redfigure.

Athenian Potters and Painters III

Athenian Potters and Painters III presents a rich mass of new material on Greek vases, including finds from excavations at the Kerameikos in Athens and Despotiko in the Cyclades. Some contributions focus on painters or workshops Ð Paseas, the Robinson Group, and the structure of the figured pottery industry in Athens; others on vase forms Ð plates, phialai, cups, and the change in shapes at the end of the sixth century BC. Context, trade, kalos inscriptions, reception, the fabrication of inscribed paintersÕ names to create a fictitious biography, and the reconstruction of the contents of an Etruscan tomb are also explored. The iconography and iconology of various types of figured scenes on Attic pottery serve as the subject of a wide range of papers Ð chariots, dogs, baskets, heads, departures, an Amazonomachy, Menelaus and Helen, red-figure komasts, symposia, and scenes of pursuit. Among the special vases presented are a black spotlight stamnos and a column krater by the Suessula Painter. Athenian Potters and Painters III, the proceedings of an international conference held at the College of William and Mary in Virginia in 2012, will, like the previous two volumes, become a standard reference work in the study of Greek pottery.

Burial and Social Change in First Millennium BC Italy

The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (Seventh-Fourth Centuries BCE) (BAR S2364). Oxford, Archaeopress. Paolucci, G. (2011) L'Etruria padana. In G. Paolucci and A. Minetti (eds) Gli Etruschi nelle Terre di ...

Burial and Social Change in First Millennium BC Italy

In the first millennium BC, communities in Italy underwent crucial transformations which scholars have often subsumed under the heading of ‘state formation’, namely increased social stratification, the centralization of political power and, in some cases, urbanisation. Most research has tended to approach the phenomenon of state formation and social change in relation to specific territorial dynamics of growth and expansion, changing modes of exploitation of food and other resources over time, and the adoption of selected socio-ritual practices by the ruling élites in order to construct and negotiate authority. In contrast, comparatively little attention has been paid to the question of how these key developments resonated across the broader social transect, and how social groups other than ruling élites both promoted these changes and experienced their effects. The chief aim of this collection of 14 papers is to harness innovative approaches to the exceptionally rich mortuary evidence of first millennium BC Italy, in order to investigate the roles and identities of social actors who either struggled for power and social recognition, or were manipulated and exploited by superior authorities in a phase of tumultuous socio-political change throughout the entire Mediterranean basin. Contributors provide a diverse range of approaches in order to examine how power operated in society, how it was exercised and resisted, and how this can be studied through mortuary evidence. Section 1 addresses the construction of identity by focusing mainly on the manipulation of age, ethnic and gender categories in society in regions and sites that reached notable power and splendor in first millennium BC Italy. These include Etruria, Latium, Campania and the rich settlement of Verucchio, in Emilia Romagna. Each paper in Section 2 offers a counterpoint to a contribution in Section 1 with an overall emphasis on scholarly multivocality, and the multiplicity of the theoretical approaches that can be used to read the archaeological evidence.

Approaching the Ancient Artifact

The World of Greek Vases, Rome, 45–62. Paleothodoros, Dimitrios (ed.) (2012), The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (Seventh-Fourth centuries BC), BAR International Series 2364, Oxford.

Approaching the Ancient Artifact

This volume consists consists of forty contributions written by an internationally renowned selection of scholars. The authors adopt an interdisciplinary methodology, examining both literary and archaeological sources, and a comparative perspective that transgresses national, chronological, and cultural boundaries, in order to investigate the nature of the links between text and image. This multifaceted approach to the study of ancient artifacts enables the authors to treat art and artistic production as activities that do not merely mirror social or cultural relationships but rather, and more significantly, as activities that create social and cultural relationships. The essays in this book are motivated by their authors' belief that there is no simple direct link between art and myths, art and text, or art and ritual, and that art should not be delegated to the role of a by-product of a literate culture. Instead, the contextual and symbolic analyses of artifacts and representations offered in this volume elucidate how art actively shaped myth, how it changed texts, how it transformed ritual, and how it altered the course of local, regional, and Mediterranean histories.

Kainua Marzabotto

AP 7: 7–42. Anzalone, R. M. 2019. “Il Museo Nazionale Etrusco Pompeo Aria.” In Kainua e Spina: Etruschi a confronto. ... In The Con- texts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (SeventhFourth Centuries BCE), ed.

Kainua  Marzabotto

Leading scholars examine Etruscan culture and society through recent archaeological findings in Kainua.

How to Do Things with History

“Sex and the Athenian Woman: A Contextual Analysis of Erotic Vase-Paintings from Attic Graves of the 5th Century BC.” In The Contexts of Painted Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (SeventhFourth Centuries BCE), ...

How to Do Things with History

How to Do Things with History is a collection of essays that explores current and future approaches to the study of ancient Greek cultural history. Rather than focus directly on methodology, the essays in this volume demonstrate how some of the most productive and significant methodologies for studying ancient Greece can be employed to illuminate a range of different kinds of subject matter. These essays, which bring together the work of some of the most talented scholars in the field, are based upon papers delivered at a conference held at Cambridge University in September of 2014 in honor of Paul Cartledge's retirement from the post of A. G. Leventis Professor of Ancient Greek Culture. For the better part of four decades, Paul Cartledge has spearheaded intellectual developments in the field of Greek culture in both scholarly and public contexts. His work has combined insightful historical accounts of particular places, periods, and thinkers with a willingness to explore comparative approaches and a keen focus on methodology. Cartledge has throughout his career emphasized the analysis of practice - the study not, for instance, of the history of thought but of thinking in action and through action. The assembled essays trace the broad horizons charted by Cartledge's work: from studies of political thinking to accounts of legal and cultural practices to politically astute approaches to historiography. The contributors to this volume all take the parameters and contours of Cartledge's work, which has profoundly influenced an entire generation of scholars, as starting points for their own historical and historiographical explorations. Those parameters and contours provide a common thread that runs through and connects all of the essays while also offering sufficient freedom for individual contributors to demonstrate an array of rich and varied approaches to the study of the past.

Interpreting the Seventh Century BC

Art and Identity in Dark Age Greece, 1100700 B.C.E. New York. Langlotz, E. 1927. ... Chryselephantine Statuary in the Ancient Mediterranean World. Oxford. ... Pottery from a Late Archaic House near the Athenian Agora (Hesperia supp.

Interpreting the Seventh Century BC

This book has its origin in a conference held at the British School at Athens in 2011 which aimed to explore the range of new archaeological information now available for the seventh century in Greek lands.

A History of Research Into Ancient Egyptian Culture in Southeast Europe

were traded by the Phoenician and Greek merchants at almost every region of the eastern Mediterranean coast.12 The ... 8th-7th centuries B.C.).15 The pre-colonial Apulian painted geometric pottery, dated during the early Iron Age, ...

A History of Research Into Ancient Egyptian Culture in Southeast Europe

This book will try to give a review of the history of the studies of Ancient Egypt done in Southeast Europe, and present some of the latest research. The book comprises a selection of papers in which scholars from various institutions of the region reviewed the different aspects of past studies along with recent research in the field.

Ceramics Cuisine and Culture

The archaeology and science of kitchen pottery in the ancient mediterranean world Michela Spataro, Alexandra Villing ... Lower PG deposit 8 17 9 4 1 0 4 39 Upper PG deposit 7 18 10 6 5 5 1 52 Total 15 35 19 10 6 5 5 91 Table 7.4.

Ceramics  Cuisine and Culture

The 23 papers presented here are the product of the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and approaches to the study of kitchen pottery between archaeologists, material scientists, historians and ethnoarchaeologists. They aim to set a vital but long-neglected category of evidence in its wider social, political and economic contexts. Structured around main themes concerning technical aspects of pottery production; cooking as socioeconomic practice; and changing tastes, culinary identities and cross-cultural encounters, a range of social economic and technological models are discussed on the basis of insights gained from the study of kitchen pottery production, use and evolution. Much discussion and work in the last decade has focussed on technical and social aspects of coarse ware and in particular kitchen ware. The chapters in this volume contribute to this debate, moving kitchen pottery beyond the Binfordian ‘technomic’ category and embracing a wider view, linking processualism, ceramic-ecology, behavioral schools, and ethnoarchaeology to research on historical developments and cultural transformations covering a broad geographical area of the Mediterranean region and spanning a long chronological sequence.

Housing in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Black-figured pottery. ... P. Guldager Bilde, J. Munk Højte, V. V. Krapivina and S. D. Kryžickij, eds., The Lower City of Olbia (Sector NGS) in the 6th Century BC to the 4th Century AD. ... Ragusa, 7 dicembre 2002/7–9 aprile 2003.

Housing in the Ancient Mediterranean World

One of the greatest benefits of studying the ancient Greek and Roman past is the ability to utilise different forms of evidence, in particular both written and archaeological sources. The contributors to this volume employ this evidence to examine ancient housing, and what might be learned of identities, families, and societies, but they also use it as a methodological locus from which to interrogate the complex relationship between different types of sources. Chapters range from the recreation of the house as it was conceived in Homeric poetry, to the decipherment of a painted Greek lekythos to build up a picture of household activities, to the conjuring of the sensorial experience of a house in Pompeii. Together, they present a rich tapestry which demonstrates what can be gained for our understanding of ancient housing from examining the interplay between the words of ancient texts and the walls of archaeological evidence.

Chryselephantine Statuary in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Painted and gilded , these korai , and no doubt their companion pieces , would have originally presented the viewer with a ... of thin gold foil in a seventh - century context near the altar and northern foundations of the Athenaion .

Chryselephantine Statuary in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Composite statues of gold (chrysos), ivory (elephas), and other precious materials were the most celebrated artworks of classical antiquity. Greek and Latin authors leave no doubt that such images provided a centrepiece for religious and civic life and that vast sums were spent to producethem. A number of these statues were the creations of antiquity's most highly acclaimed artists: Polykleitos, Alkamenes, Leochares, and, of course, Pheidias, whose magnificent Zeus Olympios came to be ranked among the Seven Wonders of the World. Although a few individual images such as Pheidias'Athena Parthenos have been the subject of detailed scholarly analysis, chryselephantine statuary as a class, from the exquisite statuettes of Minoan Crete to the majestic temple images constructed by classical Greek city-states and imitated by the Romans, has not received comprehensive study since1815. This book presents not only the ancient literary and epigraphical evidence for lost statues and examines representations of them in other media, but also assembles and analyses much-neglected physical survivals, elucidating throughout the innovative techniques, such as ivory-bending, employedin their production as well as the variety of social, religious, and political roles they played within the ancient societies that produced them.

Ancient Rome

Earth, water, and subterranean regions possessed a vast number of minor deities, spirits, and demons. ... Painted scenes in the early tombs generally express joy, but those from the fourth century BCE onward appear increasingly ...

Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome masterfully synthesizes the vast period from the second millennium BCE to the sixth century CE, carrying readers through the succession of fateful steps and agonizing crises that marked Roman evolution from an early village settlement to the capital of an extraordinary realm extending from northern Britain to the deserts of Arabia. A host of world-famous figures come to life in these pages, including Alexander the Great, Hannibal, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, Livia, Cicero, Nero, Hadrian, Diocletian, Constantine, Justinian, and Theodora. Filled with chilling narratives of violence, lust, and political expediency, this book not only describes empire-shaping political and military events but also treats social and cultural developments as integral to Roman history. William E. Dunstan highlights such key topics as the physical environment, women, law, the roles of slaves and freedmen, the plight of unprivileged free people, the composition and power of the ruling class, education, popular entertainment, food and clothing, marriage and divorce, sex, death and burial, finance and trade, scientific and medical achievements, religious institutions and practices, and artistic and literary masterpieces. All readers interested in the classical world will find this a fascinating and compelling history.