The Country House Murders A 1930s murder mystery

A 1930s Murder Mystery Kel Richards. THE COUNTRY HOUSE MURDERS A 1930s MURDER MYSTERY Kel Richards M Marylebone House Originally published in Australia in 2014 as C. S. Lewis.

The Country House Murders  A 1930s murder mystery

Dear Jack, I think I'm about to be arrested and charged with murder.' Tom Morris, busy cataloguing the library of Plumwood Hall, is in a fix. Three days before, a member of the family had keeled over at afternoon tea after eating a slice of fruit cake laced with poison. And Tom has been fingered by the weasel-like Inspector Hyde as chief suspect. The young scholar turns to the only person who can help: his old Oxford tutor, C. S. ('Jack') Lewis. As they investigate, mystery piles on mystery. Why did the victim's husband disappear twelve months before? Why is a strange tattooed foreigner living in a cottage on the moors? Who is the wild man of the woods? And most puzzling of all: how did a massive dose of cyanide get into just one slice of cake? This mind-twisting case has all the hallmarks of a classic Country House Mystery. Woven throughout the story is an engaging conversation about Lewis's Christian worldview.

The Floating Body

Kel Richards. Also by Kel Richards The Corpse in the Cellar The Country House Murders THE FLOATING BODY A 1930s MURDER MYSTERY Kel Richards M.

The Floating Body

The year is 1935. Clive Staples Lewis (known to his friends as ‘Jack’) and his brother Warren (‘Warnie’) are visiting their young friend Tom Morris at Nesfield Cathedral School. Jack is to be the guest speaker at the school’s speech night. They become eyewitnesses to a murder, an impossible murder. A man is stabbed to death by an unseen assailant, and Tom and Jack see his body fall from the rooftop . . . but the body doesn’t hit the ground until the following day! An entertaining homage to the beloved creator of Narnia – and a celebration of the hugely popular school stories of the early twentieth century – The Floating Body reveals how Jack’s nimble brain again proves invaluable to the police in their attempts to explain the seemingly impossible. Praise for The Corpse in the Cellar: ‘A satisfying, many-faceted piece of holiday reading.’ Methodist Recorder ‘Charming.’ The Tablet

The Sinister Student

Kel Richards. Also by Kel Richards The Corpse in the Cellar The Country House Murders The Floating Body THE SINISTER STUDENT A 1930s MURDER MYSTERY Kel Richards M Front Cover.

The Sinister Student

It’s a Thursday evening in 1936. Clive Staples Lewis (known to all his friends as “Jack”) is hosting a gathering of that well-known literary group, The Inklings. Among the regulars are his brother Warnie, J. R. R. Tolkien, Neville Coghill, Hugo Dyson and Adam Fox. Two visitors are also attending – Jack’s old pupil Tom Morris and an undergraduate named Auberon Willesden. The following morning Willesden is found murdered in his room in Magdalen, though both the door and the windows were locked from the inside. And not only has he been murdered: he has been beheaded – and the head is missing! Who killed the student? And why? And, more baffling still – how was it done? It’s a puzzle that will tax the brilliant ingenuity of Jack and his fellow Inklings to the limit. Praise for The Corpse in the Cellar: ‘A satisfying, many-faceted piece of holiday reading.’ Methodist Recorder ‘Charming.’ The Tablet

Murder at Ashgrove House

This is a classic country house murder mystery set during the golden age of crime and will appeal to fans of Agatha Christie and Downton Abbey.

Murder at Ashgrove House

"The first book in the Rose Simpson mysteries. When Sir William and Lady Withers invite friends and family to a weekend house party at their country home, Ashgrove House, they are faced with the arrival of both invited and uninvited guests, the consequence of which is murder. Set in 1930, "Murder at Ashgrove House" is full of intrigue, clues and red herrings, with nearly everyone having a motive for wishing the victim dead. This is a classic country house murder mystery set during the golden age of crime and will appeal to fans of Agatha Christie and Downton Abbey alike"--Back cover.

Murder Most Unladylike Ebook Bundle

He's been fascinating crime fans (including the Honourable Daisy Wells) for over one hundred years, because he's just so good at what he does. ... People in the 1930s read so many murder mysteries that the mystery business boomed.

Murder Most Unladylike Ebook Bundle

Discover the million-copy-bestselling and multi-award winning series with this ten-book-collection. Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are pupils at Deepdean School for Girls, best friends - and detectives. Or, at least, they would be, if they could find any interesting cases to solve. Then the body of their teacher, Miss Bell, is discovered in the school gym, and the girls must put their detective skills to the test at last . . . From a murder mystery in a London theatre to a mysterious death on the Orient Express, a dastardly kidnapping in Hong Kong to their most perilous case on the River Nile, Daisy and Hazel can crack any case. Includes: Murder Most Unladylike Arsenic For Tea First Class Murder Jolly Foul Play Mistletoe and Murder Death in the Spotlight A Spoonful of Murder Top Marks For Murder Death Sets Sail Cream Buns and Crime

Sequels

Secret ofChimneys, The (dodd, 1925) Battle is called in to inves- tigate the murder of Count Stanislas of herzoslovakia at the country estate of Chimneys. 2. Seven Dials Mystery, The (dodd, 1929) Chimneys is again the setting for this ...

Sequels

A guide to series fiction lists popular series, identifies novels by character, and offers guidance on the order in which to read unnumbered series.

Women Writers of Great Britain and Europe

tional claptrap (The Seven Dials Mystery, 1929, has been called “almost embarrassing” in its “bright young things, ... with the showing of Murder at Midnight in the village hall of St. Mary Mead, which all the world knows is the home of ...

Women Writers of Great Britain and Europe

First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Three Dahlias

Praise for The Three Dahlias 'An absolute treat of a read with all the ingredients of a vintage murder mystery: a country house, mysterious dead bodies and three actresses all keen to catch the killer. Perfect weekend reading!

The Three Dahlias

It wouldn't be a country house weekend without a little murder. . . Three rival actresses team up to solve a murder at the stately home of Lettice Davenport, the author whose sleuthing creation of the 1930s, Dahlia Lively, had made each of them famous to a new generation. A contemporary mystery with a Golden Age feel, perfect for fans of Agatha Christie and Jessica Fellowes - and Janice Hallett and Richard Osman, of course! In attendance at Aldermere: the VIP fans, staying at house; the fan club president turned convention organiser; the team behind the newest movie adaptation of Davenport's books; the Davenport family themselves; and the three actresses famous for portraying Dahlia Lively through the decades. There is national treasure Rosalind King, from the original movies, who's feeling sensitive that she's past her prime, TV Dahlia for thirteen seasons, Caro Hooper, who believes she really IS Dahlia Lively, and ex-child star Posy Starling, fresh out of the fame wilderness (and rehab) to take on the Dahlia mantle for the new movie - but feeling outclassed by her predecessors. Each actress has her own interpretation of the character and her own secrets to hide - but this English summer weekend they will have to put aside their differences as the crimes at Aldermere turn anything but cosy. When fictional death turns into real bodies, can the three Dahlias find the answers to the murders among the fans, the film crew and the family - or even in Lettice's books themselves? Praise for The Three Dahlias 'An absolute treat of a read with all the ingredients of a vintage murder mystery: a country house, mysterious dead bodies and three actresses all keen to catch the killer. Perfect weekend reading!' Janice Hallett, author of The Appeal 'A wonderful celebration of Golden Age crime. . . a read you can sink into, just like the perfect country house weekend. You will definitely love Dahlia in all her guises by the end' S.J. Bennett, author of The Windsor Knot 'I loved it - witty, engaging and hugely enjoyable. A must for fans of classic mysteries' Frances Brody 'An affectionate homage to the Golden Age of Detective Fiction and a wry nod to our continuing fascination with it. Great fun. Warm, ingenious and. . . lively!' L C Tyler

Mystery Movie Series of 1930s Hollywood

But when Vance tries to flee the country, the young boy, in an amusing moment, tells the inspecting officer that Vance is ... Nevertheless, his performance pales in comparison to William Powell's performance in The Kennel Murder Case— ...

Mystery Movie Series of 1930s Hollywood

"This companion volume to Mystery Movie Series of 1940s Hollywood focuses on 22 different series and 167 individual films. Each series is placed within its historical context, with emphasis on its source material and the changes or developments within the series. Also included are reviews of all the series' films, analyzing the quality and cohesiveness of the plotlines "--

Murder Will Speak

The nexttwo Connington detective novels, The Eyeinthe Museum (1929) and The Two Tickets Puzzle (1930), have a different ... triumphantlyreturned in1931 in The Boathouse Riddle, another wellconstructed criminous country house affair.

Murder Will Speak

Thief, criminal and probably a coward, would Hyson have had the courage to kill himself or did someone catch up with him? Did his death have anything to do with Mrs Telford, who committed suicide shortly before? The Inspector, anticipating a routine investigation, finds conflicting stories, poison pen letters, and damning information about Hyson. It takes Sir Clinton Driffield to untangle the case and prove that the cast-iron alibi is the one which should arouse suspicion.

Contemporary Popular Writers

Her novels recreate the classic country - house murder mysteries of the 1930s , setting each case in a modern example of a closed community . The first novel by Grimes , The Man with a Load of Mischief ( 1981 ) , introduces the reader ...

Contemporary Popular Writers

Contains brief entries for over three hundred contemporary authors

Twentieth Century Crime Mystery Writers

Plots, often complicated with multiple murders or with murders faked to look like suicide, gradually reveal the past, ... In the best of the novels, The Case of the Abominable Snowman, set in a country house, Minute for Murder, ...

Twentieth Century Crime   Mystery Writers


Quota Quickies

After making Neil Gordon's The Shakespeare Murders as The Third Clue in 1934 , Fox successfully recycled the story as The Claydon Treasure Mystery only four years later . Even by the early 1930s , the country - house mystery genre was ...

Quota Quickies

This book, the first of two volumes, will provide a major new history of the British B film, tracing the development of the low-budget supporting feature from the 1927 Films Act (which introduced a quota system for the distribution and exhibition of indigenous product) to the age of television, when B film producers channelled their energies into making TV programmes. Along the way, the authors will address leading producers and studios, B film stars, distributors, the genres and themes that tended to dominate B film production (comedy, horror, crime and fantasy). 'Quota Quickies' will include a case study of the B films of Michael Powell. The authors' argument is that the B film was hugely important in British cinema history in offering an opportunity for British actors and technicians to develop their careers, and that the films themselves provided an outlet for the exploration of peculiarly British cultural concerns in an industry traditionally dominated by Hollywood output. They also contend that some of the films stand up well to contemporary viewing and are deserving of critical re-evaluation.

Ezra Pound s and Olga Rudge s The Blue Spill

The rising popularity of English detective fiction in the 1920s saw the emergence of such subgenres as the country-house murder mystery – Agatha Christie's The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920) which introduced Hercule Poirot, ...

Ezra Pound s and Olga Rudge s The Blue Spill

Written during the Italian winter of 1930, The Blue Spill is an unfinished detective novel written by Ezra Pound – the leading figure of modernist poetry in the 20th century – and his long-time companion Olga Rudge. Published for the first time in this authoritative critical edition, the novel reflects both Rudge's and Pound's voracious reading of popular fiction as it echoes and parodies such writers as Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers and P.G. Wodehouse. Based on the original manuscripts of the novel, this critical edition includes annotation and textual commentary throughout. The book also includes critical essays exploring the contexts of the work, from the dynamics of artistic collaboration to the growing popularity of detective fiction at the beginning of the 20th century. Taken together, this unique publication sheds new light on the relationship between the literary avant-garde and popular culture in the modernist period.

Investigating Arthur Upfield

The landscape itself becomes the murder weapon. The ingredients are used just as they would be in an English country house mystery, even to the initial suspicion of the native settlement. (In country house murders, the servants or ...

Investigating Arthur Upfield

Arthur Upfield created Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte (Bony) who features in twenty-nine novels written from the 1920s to the the 1960s, mostly set in the Australian Outback. He was the first Australian professional writer of crime detection novels. Upfield arrived in Australia from England on 4 November 1911, and this collection of twenty-two critical essays by academics and scholars has been published to celebrate the centenary of his arrival. The essays were all written after Upfield’s death in 1964 and provide a wide range of responses to his fiction. The contributors, from Australia, Europe and the United States, include journalist Pamela Ruskin who was Upfield’s agent for fifteen years, anthropologists, literary scholars, pioneers in the academic study of popular culture such as John G. Cawelti and Ray B. Browne, and novelists Tony Hillerman and Mudrooroo whose own works have been inspired by Upfield’s. The collection sheds light on the extent and nature of critical responses to Upfield over time, demonstrates the type of recognition he has received and highlights the way in which different preoccupations and critical trends have dealt with his work. The essays provide the basis for an assessment of Upfield’s place not only in the international annals of crime fiction but also in the literary and cultural history of Australia.

Murder at the Mansions

Deeper research revealed that a case dubbed The Bungalow Murder, which occurred in 1924, also involved leaving ... And if you're interested in manor house ruins, an internet search will bring up plenty of homes that were abandoned.

Murder at the Mansions

South Regent Mansions has all the modern conveniences . . . including murder London, February, 1924. Discreet sleuth for the high society set, Olive Belgrave is delighted with her new flat at South Regent Mansions where she’s made several friends, including the modern career woman, Minerva, who draws a popular cartoon about a flapper for a London newspaper. But then Minerva comes to Olive for help after catching a glimpse of a disturbing sight—a dead body. At least, that’s what Minerva thought she saw, but there’s not a dead body anywhere in the posh building, and the residents are continuing with their lives as they normally do. Is Minerva seeing things? Is she barmy? Or is there a more sinister explanation? To help restore Minerva’s peace of mind, Olive investigates her neighbors. They include: society’s “it” girl of the moment, an accountant with a fondness for gadgets, a snooty society matron, and a school teacher turned bridge instructor. Olive uncovers rivalries, clandestine affairs, and hidden jealousies. With dashing Jasper at her side, Olive must discover whose secret is worth killing for. If you like sophisticated whodunits, charming characters, and novels with a lighthearted tone, you’ll enjoy the seventh installment of the High Society Lady Detective series, Murder at the Mansions, from USA Today bestselling author, Sara Rosett.

The Boathouse Riddle

The next two Connington detective novels, The Eye inthe Museum (1929) and The TwoTickets Puzzle (1930), have a different ... Laterin the yearcame The Sweepstake Murders,which boasts the perennially popular tontine multiplemurder plot, ...

The Boathouse Riddle

When Chief Constable Sir Clinton Driffield goes to stay with his friend Wendover, mysterious goings-on in the boathouse he owns soon attract the duo's attention. Lights go on and off, strangers come in and out, and a game warden is found murdered nearby. And as they work to solve the crime, a second body is dredged up from the lake ... 'Mr J. J. Connington is a name revered by all specialists on detective fiction' Spectator

Masters of the Humdrum Mystery

The Murders in Praed Street (1928) (a mass murderer is at work, with Priestley as an intended victim) 5. The House on Tollard Ridge (1929) (mechanically ingenious murder, with an unconventional heroine) 6. The Davidson Case (1929) ...

Masters of the  Humdrum  Mystery

In 1972, in an attempt to elevate the stature of the “crime novel,” influential crime writer and critic Julian Symons cast numerous Golden Age detective fiction writers into literary perdition as “Humdrums,” condemning their focus on puzzle plots over stylish writing and explorations of character, setting and theme. This volume explores the works of three prominent British “Humdrums”—Cecil John Charles Street, Freeman Wills Crofts, and Alfred Walter Stewart—revealing their work to be more complex, as puzzles and as social documents, than Symons allowed. By championing the intrinsic merit of these mystery writers, the study demonstrates that reintegrating the “Humdrums” into mystery genre studies provides a fuller understanding of the Golden Age of detective fiction and its aftermath.

Common Sense Is All You Need

The nexttwo Connington detective novels, The Eyeinthe Museum (1929) and The Two Tickets Puzzle (1930), have a different ... triumphantlyreturned in1931 in The Boathouse Riddle, another wellconstructed criminous country house affair.

Common Sense Is All You Need

When Pickford's body was found hanging from a beam in his garage, Inspector Loxton was sure that it was a case of suicide following a series of financial and domestic worries. Then came the criminologist with his slogan, 'Common sense is all you need', and in ten minutes he upset the inspector's hypothesis. Further evidence pointed so clearly in one direction that the arrest and the conviction of the criminal seemed almost a matter of form. But both the Inspector and the expert are way off course, and it is left to the Chief Constable to clear up the mystery ... 'Mr Connington has the art of writing delightful detective novels' Baltimore Evening Sun

The Four Defences

The nexttwo Connington detective novels, The Eyeinthe Museum (1929) and The Two Tickets Puzzle (1930), have a different ... triumphantlyreturned in1931 in The Boathouse Riddle, another wellconstructed criminous country house affair.

The Four Defences

An unidentified body is found in a blazing car. A man in the locality is missing. But the corpse in the car is not that of the missing man, though someone has made an uncommonly thorough job of faking it to seem so. And just because his unknown opponent had gone to such lengths to prevent an investigation going further, Detective Mark Brand aka The Counsellor's 'satiable curiosity' is up ... 'As a maker of watertight puzzles Mr Connington has no superior' Daily Mail