The Dao of the Military

Translation previously published in: The Huainanzi. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.

The Dao of the Military

Translation previously published in: The Huainanzi. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.

The Dao of the Military

using the military, one cannot completely understand the profit of using the military.31 The central irony of military affairs, from the new perspective of the Sunzi, is that the army consumed the very assets that it existed to defend ...

The Dao of the Military

Master Sun's The Art of War is by no means the only ancient Chinese treatise on military affairs. One chapter in the Huainanzi, an important compendium of philosophy and political theory written in the second century BCE, synthesizes the entire corpus of military literature inherited from the Chinese classical era. Drawing on all major, existing military writings, as well as other lost sources, it assesses tactics and strategy, logistics, organization, and political economy, as well as cosmology and the fundamental morality of warfare. This powerful work set out to become the last word on military matters, subsuming and replacing all preceding literature. Written under the sponsorship of Liu An, king of Huainan, the Huainanzi's "military methods" emphasize the preservation of peace as the ultimate value to be served by the military, insisting that the army can be effectively and rightly used only when defending the sacred hereditary position of the emperor and his vassals. This position stands in stark contrast to that of The Art of War, which prioritizes the enrichment and empowerment of the state. Liu An's philosophy also argues that military success depends on the personal cultivation of the commander and that deception is not enough to secure victory. Only a commander with the exceptional qualities of insight and cognition, developed through a program of meditative practice and yogic refinement, can effectively control and interpret the strategic situation. Andrew Seth Meyer offers both a full translation of this text and an extensive analysis of its historical context. His thorough treatment relates Liu An's teachings to issues in Chinese philosophy, culture, religion, and history, helping to interpret their uncommon message.

Military Thought of Asia

The Dao of the Military is arguing for a federal Chinese Empire in which the outlying provinces will enjoy autonomous privileges, especially with regard to their culture and traditional customary laws and regulations.

Military Thought of Asia

Military Thought of Asia challenges the assertion that the generation of rational secular ideas about the conduct of warfare is the preserve of the West, by analysing the history of ideas of warfare in Asia from the ancient period to the present. The volume takes a transcontinental and comparative approach to provide a broad overview of the evolution of military thought in Asia. The military traditions and theories which have emerged in different parts of Eurasia throughout history are products of geopolitics and unique to the different regions. The book considers the systematic and tight representation of ideas by famous figures including Kautlya and Sun Tzu. At the same time, it also highlights publications on military affairs by small men like mid-ranking officers and scattered ideas regarding the origin, nature and societal impact of organised violence present in miscellaneous sources like coins, inscriptions, paintings and fictional literature. In so doing, the book fills a historiographical gap in scholarship on military thought, which marginalises Asia to the part of cameo, and historicises the evolution of theory and the praxis of warfare. The volume shows that the ‘East’ has a long unbroken tradition of conceptualising war and its place in society from the Classical Era to the Information Age. It is essential reading for those interested in the evolution of military thought throughout history, particularly in Asia.

The Chinese Strategic Mind

Of all the classics, Sun Tzu's work has been most comprehensive and influential, but other thinkers and classics have also contributed to China's military literature. In the introduction to The Dao of the Military, Liu An's Art of War, ...

The Chinese Strategic Mind

This book addresses the fundamental issue: does the Chinese strategic mind have its own idiosyncrasies which differ considerably from those of the Western mind? It expounds and unravels the particular characteristics of the Chinese strategic mind: what they are, how they are evolved and what strategic implications they have. This book adopts a holistic approach to an analysis of Chinese strategic thinking, drawing upon the fields of literature (including the sources of both the Chinese and English languages), military studies, political science, history, sociology, psychology, philosophy, linguistics and business strategy. It combines a detailed consideration of these disciplines with a series of case studies to elucidate the formation, nature and crucial managerial implications of the idiosyncratic Chinese strategic mind.

Military Review

An Army - Unique Program : Job Assistance Centers Captain Thomas M. Hale , US Navy , Retired , Lieutenant Colonel ... being helped ) often operated Transition Assistance Office ( TAO ) , which wrongly think of the JAC as performing a ...

Military Review


Tao of Soldiering The Chinese Paradigm The Shift in Human Resources Development in PLA and Lessons for India

This book would enable readers to comprehend and grasp the nuances of the development of human potential in the military in general and PLA in specific.

Tao of Soldiering  The Chinese Paradigm  The Shift in Human Resources Development in PLA and Lessons for India

Soldiering is all about the growth and development of human potential in the military organization. The approach to soldiering in China is distinct as compared to any military in the world. This book would enable readers to comprehend and grasp the nuances of the development of human potential in the military in general and PLA in specific.

The Dao of World Politics

Both camps enhance their military capabilities toprepare forworst-case scenarios. Military expenditures increase, along with predictable socio-economicadjustments andsacrifices. Westphalia World«s eagerand intimate partner, ...

The Dao of World Politics

This book draws on Daoist yin/yang dialectics to move world politics from the current stasis of hegemony, hierarchy, and violence to a more balanced engagement with parity, fluidity, and ethics. The author theorizes that we may develop a richer, more representative approach towards sustainable and democratic governance by offering a non-Western alternative to hegemonic debates in IR. The book presents the story of world politics by integrating folk tales and popular culture with policy analysis. It does not exclude current models of liberal internationalism but rather brackets them for another day, another purpose. The deconstruction of IR as a singular unifying school of thought through the lens of a non-Westphalian analytic shows a unique perspective on the forces that drive and shape world politics. This book suggests new ways to articulate and act so that global politics is more inclusive and less coercive. Only then, the book claims, could IR realize what the dao has always stood for: a world of compassion and care. The Dao of World Politics bridges the humanities and social sciences, and will be of interest to scholars and students of the global/international, as well as policymakers and activists of the local/domestic.

The Royal Military Chronicle

Military Operations in Portugal . the valley of Mondego , he ordered the right wing of his army under GeneraHill to join ... He blew np the bridge of Marcella , that on the Alva , and also the bridge of Santal Comba - Dao , on the Dao .

The Royal Military Chronicle


Sun Pin Military Methods

21 Therefore, conscientious moral rulers can undertake punitive military actions only with great reluctance, in the full recognition that Heaven abhors such ... The army is an inauspicious implement, and the Tao of Heaven abhors it.

Sun Pin  Military Methods

A description of the awesome army commanded by Sun Pin, a direct descendent of the legendary Sun Tzu. This translation comments on Sun Pin's life and times. It analyzes in detail Sun Pin's tactics in battles, and compares his strategic thinking with that of Sun Tzu.

Cultural Realism

... by means of the dao” (daosheng ##), where the ruler or his general so understands the essence of military affairs, ... essence and life force, such that its army scatters before the victorious side has deployed its forces (14.1.1).

Cultural Realism

Cultural Realism is an in-depth study of premodern Chinese strategic thought that has important implications for contemporary international relations theory. In applying a Western theoretical debate to China, Iain Johnston advances rigorous procedures for testing for the existence and influence of "strategic culture." Johnston sets out to answer two empirical questions. Is there a substantively consistent and temporally persistent Chinese strategic culture? If so, to what extent has it influenced China's approaches to security? The focus of his study is the Ming dynasty's grand strategy against the Mongols (1368-1644). First Johnston examines ancient military texts as sources of Chinese strategic culture, using cognitive mapping, symbolic analysis and congruence tests to determine whether there is a consistent grand strategic preference ranking across texts that constitutes a single strategic culture. Then he applies similar techniques to determine the effect of the strategic culture on the strategic preferences of the Ming decision makers. Finally, he assesses the effect of these preferences on Ming policies towards the Mongol "threat." The findings of this book challenge dominant interpretations of traditional Chinese strategic thought. They suggest also that the roots of realpolitik are ideational and not predominantly structural. The results lead to the surprising conclusion that there may be, in fact, fewer cross-national differences in strategic culture than proponents of the "strategic culture" approach think.

New Interpretations in Naval History

sought to put the best face on the political and military situation and insisted that his subordinates do likewise . ... Some preparatory measures for a helicopter evacuation were taken , notably by military officers of the DAO staff in ...

New Interpretations in Naval History


The Political History in Wei Jin Southern and Northern Dynasty

At this time, Tao Xun was also killed by Su Jun because of his son, Jiang Taishou Tao Zhan, and he promised to go ... He went out to the town of Wuhu as the general of Pingxi, the military of the Xuancheng Jiangxi, and the history of ...

The Political History in Wei  Jin  Southern and Northern Dynasty

The book is the volume of “The Political History in Wei, Jin, Southern and Northern Dynasty ” among a series of books of “Deep into China Histories”. The earliest known written records of the history of China date from as early as 1250 BC, from the Shang dynasty (c. 1600–1046 BC) and the Bamboo Annals (296 BC) describe a Xia dynasty (c. 2070–1600 BC) before the Shang, but no writing is known from the period The Shang ruled in the Yellow River valley, which is commonly held to be the cradle of Chinese civilization. However, Neolithic civilizations originated at various cultural centers along both the Yellow River and Yangtze River. These Yellow River and Yangtze civilizations arose millennia before the Shang. With thousands of years of continuous history, China is one of the world's oldest civilizations, and is regarded as one of the cradles of civilization.The Zhou dynasty (1046–256 BC) supplanted the Shang and introduced the concept of the Mandate of Heaven to justify their rule. The central Zhou government began to weaken due to external and internal pressures in the 8th century BC, and the country eventually splintered into smaller states during the Spring and Autumn period. These states became independent and warred with one another in the following Warring States period. Much of traditional Chinese culture, literature and philosophy first developed during those troubled times.In 221 BC Qin Shi Huang conquered the various warring states and created for himself the title of Huangdi or "emperor" of the Qin, marking the beginning of imperial China. However, the oppressive government fell soon after his death, and was supplanted by the longer-lived Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD). Successive dynasties developed bureaucratic systems that enabled the emperor to control vast territories directly. In the 21 centuries from 206 BC until AD 1912, routine administrative tasks were handled by a special elite of scholar-officials. Young men, well-versed in calligraphy, history, literature, and philosophy, were carefully selected through difficult government examinations. China's last dynasty was the Qing (1644–1912), which was replaced by the Republic of China in 1912, and in the mainland by the People's Republic of China in 1949.Chinese history has alternated between periods of political unity and peace, and periods of war and failed statehood – the most recent being the Chinese Civil War (1927–1949). China was occasionally dominated by steppe peoples, most of whom were eventually assimilated into the Han Chinese culture and population. Between eras of multiple kingdoms and warlordism, Chinese dynasties have ruled parts or all of China; in some eras control stretched as far as Xinjiang and Tibet, as at present. Traditional culture, and influences from other parts of Asia and the Western world (carried by waves of immigration, cultural assimilation, expansion, and foreign contact), form the basis of the modern culture of China.

Selected Military Writings of Mao Tse tung

To save his critical military situation, Chiang Kai-shek went to the front, took personal command and mustered 3 armies under Chiu Ching-chuan, Ou Shou-nien and Huang Po-tao to start an attack on Kaifeng from several directions.

Selected Military Writings of Mao Tse tung


Designing Boundaries in Early China

12 Liu An, Huainanzi jishi 1:15.1058; see also Andrew Seth Meyer, The Dao of the Military: Liu AnVs Art of War (New York: Columbia University Press, 2012), 104.掌九州之圖,以周知其山林、川澤之阻,而達其道路。設國之五溝五涂,而樹之林以為阻 ...

Designing Boundaries in Early China

Explores how sovereign space in early China was imagined and negotiated in the ancient world.

The Revival of China with Pictures

In late April, XU's Army Group advanced to the Pengwen area of Xi County, via Damaijiao and Shuangzhi Town, ... Before the rendezvous, ZHANG Guo-tao had sent the Red 32nd Army to coordinate with the HE Long's troops advancing northward.

The Revival of China    with Pictures

The book is about the revival of China in the 20th century and the first decade of the 21st century. It has eight parts: (1) The civil revolution in China, (2) The countryside bases, (3) The Long Match of the Red Army, (4) The Anti Japanese War, (5) Decisive civil battles before the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, (6) The Mao Era before the Great Cultural Revolution, (7) The Great Cultural Revolution, and (8) The Reform and opening up. This version of the book is with pictures.

AR 621 1 08 28 2007 TRAINING OF MILITARY PERSONNEL AT CIVILIAN INSTITUTIONS Survival Ebooks

... attached to an Army overseas command for command and control when the school is located within its area. For areas where there is no major overseas command, students will be attached for command and control purposes only to the DAO.

AR 621 1 08 28 2007 TRAINING OF MILITARY PERSONNEL AT CIVILIAN INSTITUTIONS   Survival Ebooks

AR 621-1 08/28/2007 TRAINING OF MILITARY PERSONNEL AT CIVILIAN INSTITUTIONS , Survival Ebooks

Department of Defense Appropriations for

The Navy is being authorized 7,780 new positions of which 1,840 is being transferred as a result of its assuming responsibility as executive agent for the DAO office in Thailand from the Army . When does the Navy assume this ...

Department of Defense Appropriations for


The Tao Of Spycraft

36. " Planning for the Army . " 37. " Preparation of Strategic Power . " 38. " Initial Estimations , " Art of War . 39. " The Tao of the Military , " Six Secret Teachings . 40. A famous quote from " Initial Estimations , ” Art of War .

The Tao Of Spycraft

But The Tao of Spycraft is more than an examination of military tactics; it also provides a thorough overview of the history of spies in China, emphasizing their early development, ruthless employment, and dramatic success in subverting famous generals, dooming states to extinction, and facilitating the rise of the first imperial dynasty known as the Ch'in.

The Military History in Sui Tang and Five Dynasties

Shah Luo, and Su Dingfang led the army back. ... Li Dide and others to ship 400 ships in Hongzhou, Raozhou and Jiangzhou to transport military food. ... Li Ji and Dao Zong conquered the city of Gaiyu (now northeast of Shenyang).

The Military History in Sui  Tang and Five Dynasties

The book is the volume of “The Military History in Sui, Tang and Five Dynasties” among a series of books of “Deep into China Histories”. The earliest known written records of the history of China date from as early as 1250 BC, from the Shang dynasty (c. 1600–1046 BC) and the Bamboo Annals (296 BC) describe a Xia dynasty (c. 2070–1600 BC) before the Shang, but no writing is known from the period The Shang ruled in the Yellow River valley, which is commonly held to be the cradle of Chinese civilization. However, Neolithic civilizations originated at various cultural centers along both the Yellow River and Yangtze River. These Yellow River and Yangtze civilizations arose millennia before the Shang. With thousands of years of continuous history, China is one of the world's oldest civilizations, and is regarded as one of the cradles of civilization.The Zhou dynasty (1046–256 BC) supplanted the Shang and introduced the concept of the Mandate of Heaven to justify their rule. The central Zhou government began to weaken due to external and internal pressures in the 8th century BC, and the country eventually splintered into smaller states during the Spring and Autumn period. These states became independent and warred with one another in the following Warring States period. Much of traditional Chinese culture, literature and philosophy first developed during those troubled times.In 221 BC Qin Shi Huang conquered the various warring states and created for himself the title of Huangdi or "emperor" of the Qin, marking the beginning of imperial China. However, the oppressive government fell soon after his death, and was supplanted by the longer-lived Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD). Successive dynasties developed bureaucratic systems that enabled the emperor to control vast territories directly. In the 21 centuries from 206 BC until AD 1912, routine administrative tasks were handled by a special elite of scholar-officials. Young men, well-versed in calligraphy, history, literature, and philosophy, were carefully selected through difficult government examinations. China's last dynasty was the Qing (1644–1912), which was replaced by the Republic of China in 1912, and in the mainland by the People's Republic of China in 1949.Chinese history has alternated between periods of political unity and peace, and periods of war and failed statehood – the most recent being the Chinese Civil War (1927–1949). China was occasionally dominated by steppe peoples, most of whom were eventually assimilated into the Han Chinese culture and population. Between eras of multiple kingdoms and warlordism, Chinese dynasties have ruled parts or all of China; in some eras control stretched as far as Xinjiang and Tibet, as at present. Traditional culture, and influences from other parts of Asia and the Western world (carried by waves of immigration, cultural assimilation, expansion, and foreign contact), form the basis of the modern culture of China.

Black April

... U.S. Defense Attaché Office (DAO), the residual American military presence in South Vietnam, was growing increasingly concerned. Beginningin April 1973 and continuing until the end,the DAO intelligence chief, Colonel WilliamLe Gro, ...

Black April

The defeat of South Vietnam was arguably America’s worst foreign policy disaster of the 20th Century. Yet a complete understanding of the endgame—from the 27 January 1973 signing of the Paris Peace Accords to South Vietnam’s surrender on 30 April 1975—has eluded us. Black April addresses that deficit. A culmination of exhaustive research in three distinct areas: primary source documents from American archives, North Vietnamese publications containing primary and secondary source material, and dozens of articles and numerous interviews with key South Vietnamese participants, this book represents one of the largest Vietnamese translation projects ever accomplished, including almost one hundred rarely or never seen before North Vietnamese unit histories, battle studies, and memoirs. Most important, to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of South Vietnam’s conquest, the leaders in Hanoi released several compendiums of formerly highly classified cables and memorandum between the Politburo and its military commanders in the south. This treasure trove of primary source materials provides the most complete insight into North Vietnamese decision-making ever complied. While South Vietnamese deliberations remain less clear, enough material exists to provide a decent overview. Ultimately, whatever errors occurred on the American and South Vietnamese side, the simple fact remains that the country was conquered by a North Vietnamese military invasion despite written pledges by Hanoi’s leadership against such action. Hanoi’s momentous choice to destroy the Paris Peace Accords and militarily end the war sent a generation of South Vietnamese into exile, and exacerbated a societal trauma in America over our long Vietnam involvement that reverberates to this day. How that transpired deserves deeper scrutiny.