The Death of Jesus

This is not to say that the crucifixion of Jesus has at all times and all places been subjected to a single interpretation by Christian believers.

The Death of Jesus

Proclamation of the crucified Messiah is always close at hand when one attempts even the most cursory articulation of the Christian faith. Viewed simultaneously as scandal and eschatological turning-point the cross of Christ is the cornerstone of Christian faith and praxis. This is not to say that the crucifixion of Jesus has at all times and all places been subjected to a single interpretation by Christian believers. Already in the dawning years of the Christian movement Jesus' disciples understood his death in numerous ways, utilizing a variety of images. This study takes as its primary points of departure the prominence of the cross-event for Christians and the variety of it interpretations. Here we seek a partial answer to the question how earliest Christianity understood the death of Jesus. Originally, this study took the form of a 1985 University of Aberdeen dissertation.

The Characters of the Crucifixion

The Characters of the Crucifixion retells, from a personal point of view, the gospel versions of the Passion narrative. The accounts are updated for us by "Reflection-prayers", so that we can take them to heart.

The Characters of the Crucifixion

Fichtner offers a striking retelling of the passion narrative that enables anyone to participate in the crucifixion today as a Peter, Mary Magdalene or Mary, Mother of Jesus, not only in suffering but also in the triumph. He vividly retells 38 of Jesus' stories by characterizing 15 people who are somehow involved in the crucifixion of Christ. Each presentation concludes with a reflection-prayer which updates the event of the crucifixion and shows its personal and social implications.

The Death of Jesus

J.M. Coetzee continues to explore the meaning of a world empty of memory but brimming with questions in this final book in the trilogy following "The Childhood of Jesus" and "The Schooldays of Jesus."

The Death of Jesus

A masterful new novel completes an incomparable trilogy from J. M. Coetzee, Nobel laureate and two-times winner of the Booker Prize In The Childhood of Jesus, Simòn found a boy, David, and they began life in a new land, together with a woman named Inès. In The Schooldays of Jesus, the small family searched for a home in which David could thrive. In The Death of Jesus, David, now a tall ten-year-old, is spotted by Julio Fabricante, the director of a local orphanage, playing football with his friends in the street. He shows unusual talent. When David announces that he wants to go and live with Julio and the children in his care, Simòn and Inès are stunned. David is leaving them, and they can only love him and bear witness. With almost unbearable poignancy J. M. Coetzee explores the meaning of a world empty of memory but brimming with questions.

The Death of Jesus

manifested after their experiences of the risen Jesus . More plausible , then , is Wolgang Schrage's verdict , that " Jesus ' crucifixion must have from the very first shattered the traditional expectations and concepts of believers and ...

The Death of Jesus

The death of Jesus and its interpretation present both exegetes and theologians with a puzzle. For Jesus himself seems to have left his followers few clues, and the story of his passion is ambivalent, embracing both his reluctant self-surrender in Gethsemane and his reproachful cry on Golgatha. Some of the various motifs and images used by his followers to explain this event were taken over by Paul despite the opposition he saw between the message of the cross and any human wisdom. Yet what meaning do two of the central themes of his soteriology, the corporate, representative role of Christ and the language of "righteousness" and "justification" hold for us today? Or does Paul offer just as little help here as Jesus himself did?

The Death of Jesus in Matthew

At Jesus' death the soldiers keep watch over “this man” (ου ̔͂τος, 27:54, 27:37) whom they have crucified and mocked; the women watch from afar over the one they have followed and served.83 The holy ones at Jesus' crucifixion (and ...

The Death of Jesus in Matthew

In this book, Catherine Sider Hamilton introduces a new lens through which to view the death of Jesus in Matthew. Using the concept of 'innocent blood', she situates the death of Jesus within a paradigm of purity and pollution, one that was central in the Hebrew Scriptures and early Judaism from the Second Temple to the rabbis. Hamilton traces the theme of innocent blood in Matthew's narrative in relation to two Jewish traditions of interpretation, one (in Second Temple literature) reflecting on the story of Cain and Abel; the other (chiefly in rabbinic literature) on the blood of Zechariah. 'Innocent blood' yields a vision that resists the dichotomies (intra muros vs extra muros, rejection vs redemption) that have characterized the debate, a vision in which both judgment and redemption - an end of exile - may be true. 'Innocent blood' offers a new approach not only to the meaning of Jesus' death in Matthew but also to the vexed question of the Gospel's attitude toward contemporary Judaism.

The Torn Veil

In this 2006 text, Daniel M. Gurtner examines the meaning of the rending of the veil at the death of Jesus in Matthew 27:51a by considering the functions of the veil in the Old Testament and its symbolism in Second Temple and Rabbinic ...

The Torn Veil

In this 2006 text, Daniel M. Gurtner examines the meaning of the rending of the veil at the death of Jesus in Matthew 27:51a by considering the functions of the veil in the Old Testament and its symbolism in Second Temple and Rabbinic Judaism. Gurtner incorporates these elements into a compositional exegesis of the rending text in Matthew. He concludes that the rending of the veil is an apocalyptic assertion like the opening of heaven revealing, in part, end-time images drawn from Ezekiel 37. Moreover, when the veil is torn Matthew depicts the cessation of its function, articulating the atoning role of Christ's death which gives access to God not simply in the sense of entering the Holy of Holies (as in Hebrews), but in trademark Matthean Emmanuel Christology: 'God with us'. This underscores the significance of Jesus' atoning death in the first gospel.

The Passion and the Death of Jesus Christ

Oh, how great is the debt we owe to Jesus Christ! If a criminal condemned to death were already standing at the gibbet with the rope around his neck, and a friend were to come and take the rope, and bind it round himself, ...

The Passion and the Death of Jesus Christ

The lover of souls, our most loving Redeemer, declared that he had no other motive in coming down upon earth to become man than to enkindle in the hearts of men the fire of his holy love: I am come to cast fire on earth; and what will I but that it be kindled? And, oh, what beautiful flames of love has he not enkindled in so many souls, especially by the pains that he chose to suffer in his death, in order to prove to us the immeasurable love which he still bears to us! Aeterna Press

The Death of Jesus and the Politics of Place in the Gospel of John

Jesus' activities continue to construct spaces even at his death. Jesus at the cross does not abide by simple rules of proximity and distance, or of death and life. He is firstspatially absent through death on the cross but maintains a ...

The Death of Jesus and the Politics of Place in the Gospel of John

This book's findings are rich and intriguing: In his death, Jesus--the chief architect in the production of space in the Christian realm--founds an alternative community that reorders space and creates a new reality for believers. This new community, which dwells in this radical new space, successfully resists the domination of oppressive regimes and mindsets, such as the Roman Empire. Suffering is transformed here. Many recent biblical studies have utilized various methodologies and historical-critical viewpoints, which have been helpful. However, drawing on theories of space and postcolonial approaches, Dr. Ajer breaks new ground in Johannine studies, a new terrain that will yield much fruit. The new understandings of "space" provide a key with which we may unlock more of the mysteries of the Fourth Gospel, as Ajer here demonstrates with powerful new discoveries and insights into John's Passion narrative.

Jewish Responsibility for the Death of Jesus in Luke Acts

The actions of the recent past bear out this interpretation in Stephen's view: in keeping with earlier murders of prophets, the Jews killed Jesus, just as they finally kill Stephen.4 Again a variety of details within the text suggest ...

Jewish Responsibility for the Death of Jesus in Luke Acts

For over a century New Testament scholars have explored the issue of possible antisemitism in Luke-Acts, especially because the author apparently blames the Jews for the death of Jesus. This monograph offers a fresh analysis of this question revealing a different emphasis: that among the Jews only those associated with Jerusalem, especially the Sanhedrin, are responsible for Jesus' death. Luke's Israel is in fact divided in response to Jesus, not monolithically opposed to him. Furthermore, the ascription of responsibility to the people of Jerusalem in Acts, widely regarded as a Lukan creation, in fact is more likely to have been based on sources independent of the synoptics. A consideration of ancient literature concerned with the deaths of innocent victims further suggests a likely "Sitz im Leben" for the transmission of material ascribing responsibility for Jesus' death.

A Theology of the Cross

In Paul's epistles the crucifixion story reveals a God who is free and in no way bound by human categories or expectations.

A Theology of the Cross

In Paul's epistles the crucifixion story reveals a God who is free and in no way bound by human categories or expectations. Yet God in Christ chooses to be engaged in the very depths of the human predicament. The message of the crucifixion is that God's power is manifested in weakness, not in strength. The author believes that this "weakness as strength" should be the focal point of the church's identity. However, a celebration of weakness is in complete opposition to traditional American beliefs in personal strength and a powerful church.

The Trial and Death of Jesus Christ

The Trial and Death of Jesus Christ - A Devotional History of our Lord's Passion by James Stalker.

The Trial and Death of Jesus Christ

The Trial and Death of Jesus Christ - A Devotional History of our Lord's Passion by James Stalker. According to the accounts in the New Testament, Jesus, whom Christians believe to be the Son of God as well as the Messiah, was arrested, tried, and sentenced by Pontius Pilate to be scourged, and finally crucified. Collectively referred to as the Passion, Jesus' suffering and redemptive death by crucifixion are the central aspects of Christian theology concerning the doctrines of salvation and atonement.Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament Epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is firmly established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources, though there is no consensus on the precise details of what exactly occurred.In modern scholarship, the baptism of Jesus and his crucifixion are considered to be two historically certain facts about Jesus. For example, James Dunn states that these "two facts in the life of Jesus command almost universal assent" and "rank so high on the 'almost impossible to doubt or deny' scale of historical facts" that they are often the starting points for the study of the historical Jesus. Bart Ehrman states that the crucifixion of Jesus on the orders of Pontius Pilate is the most certain element about him. John Dominic Crossan states that the crucifixion of Jesus is as certain as any historical fact can be. Eddy and Boyd state that it is now "firmly established" that there is non-Christian confirmation of the crucifixion of Jesus. Craig Blomberg states that most scholars in the third quest for the historical Jesus consider the crucifixion indisputable. Christopher M. Tuckett states that, although the exact reasons for the death of Jesus are hard to determine, one of the indisputable facts about him is that he was crucified

The Mission and Death of Jesus in Islam and Christianity

of their enemies, Jesus was vindicated by his resurrection from the dead (Mark 8:31; 9:31; 10:33-34). God had promised that he “would not let his holy one experience corruption” (Psalm 16:10, as quoted in Acts 13:35).

The Mission and Death of Jesus in Islam and Christianity

The common wisdom is that Christians and Muslims should dialogue only about what they agree on. This book takes a different approach. As the author observes, “If we focus only on our common ground, we will miss some of the motivating force of our traditions, because that force derives not only from what we hold in common, but also from those convictions that keep us apart.”

The Gospel Accounts of the Death of Jesus

The four gospel are similar in that each evengelist describes the very same event but each in a slightly different way with various characters, actions, dialogues, symbols and vocabulary.

The Gospel Accounts of the Death of Jesus

The four gospel are similar in that each evengelist describes the very same event but each in a slightly different way with various characters, actions, dialogues, symbols and vocabulary. The present study seeks to understand what each of the four Evangelists has written in depicting the death of Jesus in his specially way.

The Day Christ Died As Our Passover

This is a fresh study which will have some surprises for most students of the subject, due to the controversy surrounding the chronology.

The Day Christ Died As Our Passover

The subject of which day Christ died began to be hotly debated a few hundred years after His death. In the council of AD 325, the leaders of the Roman ?Imperial Church? thought it to be in the best interest of the Church to disassociate their ritual celebration of the death and resurrection of Christ, which they now called ?Easter,? away from the annual Jewish Passover event. They actually wanted to divert attention from the Jewishness of Jesus. In doing so, these ?fathers? guided Christendom away from the biblical reality as expressed by Paul??Christ our Passover was sacrificed for us? (1 Corinthians 5:7). This error has been locked into the celebration for over 1,600 years, not only by the Roman Catholics, but also by most of Protestantism. This is a fresh study which will have some surprises for most students of the subject, due to the controversy surrounding the chronology. It will re-align the death of Jesus Christ squarely upon the biblical setting of the Passover theme as presented in the gospels. Above all, it will demonstrate beyond any shadow of a doubt that the four gospels harmonize perfectly on the subject. It also establishes that Christ died precisely on the eve of Passover, when the lambs were being sacrificed in the Temple services. This Bible study will ? Enrich our appreciation of the Divine arrangement in redemption. Demonstrate the flawless consistency of the biblical record. Correct Christendom?s traditional day celebrating Christ?s death. Strengthen the Christian?s new freedom in Christ.

The Mission and Death of Jesus in Islam and Christianity

The common wisdom is that Christians and Muslims should dialogue only about what they agree on. This book takes a different approach.

The Mission and Death of Jesus in Islam and Christianity

The common wisdom is that Christians and Muslims should dialogue only about what they agree on. This book takes a different approach. As the author observes, "If we focus only on our common ground, we will miss some of the motivating force of our traditions, because that force derives not only from what we hold in common, but also from those convictions that keep us apart."

The Spiritual Death of Jesus

The timing of a possible separation As stated in 2.4, JDS teachers believe that Jesus was separated from God the whole time that his body lay in the grave, as well as for the hours on the cross. For this, as indicated in 3.2, ...

The  Spiritual Death  of Jesus

Winner of the Award of Excellence of the Foundation for Pentecostal Scholarship 2010. The teaching of Kenyon, Hagin and Copeland that Jesus ‘died spiritually’ (JDS) is important because of the influence of these men, not least on Pentecostalism. JDS originated with Kenyon, and has been taught in the Word-faith movement by Hagin and Copeland, despite much criticism. It incorporates three elements: in this death, Jesus was separated from God; partook of a satanic nature; and was Satan’s prey. This theological appraisal takes research far further than previous works, both in method and in scope. It concludes that adoption of JDS by Pentecostalism would be damaging in several respects, and thus draw the latter away from its moorings in traditional Christianity. Pentecostals and others are advised to reject the bulk of this teaching.

Reliving the Passion

In vivid images and richly personal detail, Wangerin helps us recognize our own faces on the streets of Jerusalem; breathe the dark and heavy air of Golgotha; and experience, as Mary and Peter did, the bewilderment, the challenge, and the ...

Reliving the Passion

No story has more significance than this: the death and resurrection of Jesus. But somehow the oft-repeated tale of Christ’s passion can become too familiar, too formalized, for us to experience its incredible immediacy. The meditations in Reliving the Passion, which received a Gold Medallion Award in 1993, follow the story as given in the gospel of Mark—from the moment when the chief priests plot to kill Jesus to the Resurrection. But these readings are more than a recounting of events; they are an imaginary reenactment, leading the reader to re-experience the Passion or perhaps see it fully for the very first time. As only a great storyteller can, Walter Wangerin enables the reader to see the story from the inside, to discover the strangeness and wonder of the events as they unfold. It’s like being there. In vivid images and richly personal detail, Wangerin helps us recognize our own faces on the streets of Jerusalem; breathe the dark and heavy air of Golgotha; and experience, as Mary and Peter did, the bewilderment, the challenge, and the ultimate revelation of knowing the man called Jesus. “The story gets personal for every reader,” writes Wangerin, “for this is indeed our story, the story whereby we personally have been saved from such a death as Jesus died. “No, there is not another tale in the world more meaningful than this—here is where we all take our stands against sin and death and Satan, upon this historical, historic event. I consider it a holy privilege to participate in it retelling. “Read this book slowly. Read it with a seeing faith. Walk the way with Jesus. We, his followers of later centuries, do follow even now. Read, walk, come, sigh, live. Live! Rise again!”