The Diary of Hamman Yaji

Chronicle of a West African Muslim Ruler Hamman Yaji James H. Vaughan, Anthony H.M. Kirk-Greene. with his son Haliru as a gift for the Germans at Garua , the warning proved accurate : the Germans beat the boy and sent him back to ...

The Diary of Hamman Yaji

In August 1927, British colonial authorities arrested Hamman Yaji, Emir of Madagali, an infamous slave trader who had terrorized the neighboring montagnard populations of the Northern Cameroons and bedeviled the colonial administrations of three nations. His diary was seized and soon became a fabled document in northern Nigerian history. Written in Arabic and translated into English by a British colonial official, the diary chronicles Hamman Yaji's daily activities between 1912 and 1927. He recorded his daily routine - where he traveled, his slaving raids and slave-trading activities, visitors and gifts received, his relations with friends and family and with the British administration, and his practice of Islam. This rare and remarkable document, made accessible to scholars for the first time since its composition more than seventy-five years ago, is enhanced by a substantial introduction that places Hamman Yaji in historical and cultural perspective and describes the diary's discovery and translation, and its significance for British colonial and West African history.

Slavery in the History of Muslim Black Africa

At the opposite end of the spectrum , far away from these legal niceties , Hamman Yaji's diary provides some examples of grass - roots , day - to - day experience . In April 1921 , a female slave belonging to one of Hamman Yaji's sons ...

Slavery in the History of Muslim Black Africa

"Fisher's account explains how slaves came to serve as currency, goods, eunuchs, soldiers, and in some cases as statesmen."--Jacket.

Veils Turbans and Islamic Reform in Northern Nigeria

—Hamman Yaji, quoted in James Vaughan and Anthony Kirk-Greene, The Diary of Hamman Yaji. It. is intriguing to imagine what the “24 veils for women” received by Hamman Yaji, the emir of Madagali (fig. 5.1), consisted of, where they came ...

Veils  Turbans  and Islamic Reform in Northern Nigeria

Veils, Turbans, and Islamic Reform in Northern Nigeria tells the story of Islamic reform from the perspective of dress, textile production, trade, and pilgrimage over the past 200 years. As Islamic reformers have sought to address societal problems such as poverty, inequality, ignorance, unemployment, extravagance, and corruption, they have used textiles as a means to express their religious positions on these concerns. Home first to the early indigo trade and later to a thriving textile industry, northern Nigeria has been a center for Islamic practice as well as a place where everything from women's hijabs to turbans, buttons, zippers, short pants, and military uniforms offers a statement on Islam. Elisha P. Renne argues that awareness of material distinctions, religious ideology, and the political and economic contexts from which successive Islamic reform groups have emerged is important for understanding how people in northern Nigeria continue to seek a proper Islamic way of being in the world and how they imagine their futures—spiritually, economically, politically, and environmentally.

Searching for Boko Haram

The Diary of Hamman Yaji JUST A CENTURY AGO, an illiterate Fulani warlord living in Madagali was investing some of his time in dictating his diary to a scribe. Madagali is located just west of the Mandara Mountains in what is now ...

Searching for Boko Haram

For the past decade, Boko Haram has relentlessly terrorized northeastern Nigeria. Few if any explanations for the rise of this violent insurgent group look beyond its roots in worldwide jihadism and recent political conflicts in central Africa. Searching for Boko Haram is the first book to examine the insurgency within the context of centuries, millennia even, of cultural change in the region. The book surveys the deep history of the lands south of Lake Chad, richly documented in archaeology and texts, to show how ancient natural and cultural events can aid in our understanding of Boko Haram's present agenda. The land's historical narrative stretches back five centuries, with cultural origins that plunge even deeper into the past. One important feature of this past is the phenomenon of frontiers and borderlands. In striking ways, Boko Haram resembles the frontier slave raiders and warlords who figure in precolonial and colonial writings on the southern Lake Chad Basin. Presently, these accounts are paralleled by the activity of smugglers, bandits (coupeurs de route--"road cutters"), and tax evaders. The borderlands of these countries are today places where the state often refuses to exercise its full authority because of the profits and opportunities illicit relationships afford state officials and bureaucrats. For the local community, Boko Haram's actions are readily understandable in terms of slave raids and borderlands. They are not mysterious and unprecedented eruptions of violence and savagery, but--as the book argues--recognizable phenomena within the contexts of local politics and history. Written from the perspective of an author who has worked in this part of Africa for more than thirty years, Searching for Boko Haram provides vital historical context to the recent rise of this terroristic force, and counters misperceptions of their activities and of the region as a whole.

Dictionary of African Biography

However, among Shaikh SaȾid's effects, correspon- dence with Hamman Yaji was discovered indicat- ing that he was a member of the sect. The diary confirms this relationship, and there are three other references to Mahdism, ...

Dictionary of African Biography

From the Pharaohs to Fanon, Dictionary of African Biography provides a comprehensive overview of the lives of the men and women who shaped Africa's history. Unprecedented in scale, DAB covers the whole continent from Tunisia to South Africa, from Sierra Leone to Somalia. It also encompasses the full scope of history from Queen Hatsheput of Egypt (1490-1468 BC) and Hannibal, the military commander and strategist of Carthage (243-183 BC), to Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana (1909-1972), Miriam Makeba and Nelson Mandela of South Africa (1918 -).

The Anthropology of Texts Persons and Publics

And the remarkable diaries of Hamman Yaji, the Muslim ruler of a small emirate in an area that is now in north-eastern Nigeria, ... the diary was written by Hamman Yaji's scribes, mainly in Arabic, with many Fulfulde words mixed in.

The Anthropology of Texts  Persons and Publics

What can texts - both written and oral - tell us about the societies that produce them? How are texts constituted in different cultures, and how do they shape societies and individuals? How can we understand the people who compose them? Drawing on examples from Africa and other countries, this original study sets out to answer these questions, by exploring textuality from a variety of angles. Topics covered include the importance of genre, the ways in which oral genres transcend the here-and-now, and the complex relationship between texts and the material world. Barber considers the ways in which personhood is evoked, both in oral poetry and in written diaries and letters, discusses the audience's role in creating the meaning of texts, and shows textual creativity to be a universal human capacity expressed in myriad forms. Engaging and thought-provoking, this book will be welcomed by anyone interested in anthropology, literature and cultural studies.

Landscapes Sources and Intellectual Projects of the West African Past

to the Diary he was keeping (Vaughan and Kirk-Greene, The Diary of Hamman Yaji: Chronicle of a West African Muslim ... In some ways his record does recall the journal – keeping of Muḥammad Bello's Infāq al – maisūr, with plunder a major ...

Landscapes  Sources and Intellectual Projects of the West African Past

Landscapes, Sources and Intellectual Projects of the West African Past outlines new directions in the historiography of West Africa. Its chapters explore new trends across regional and disciplinary fields with a focus on how political conjunctures influence source production and circulation.

The Dancing Dead

The Diary of Hamman Yaji. Chronicle of an African Ruler (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995), 9. Kirk-Greene, Adamawa, 4. Dominik, Atlantik, 208–210. Dominik spells his name as “Hamandjadji.” “Nach Fullahart war der Yerima ...

The Dancing Dead

Walter E. A. van Beek draws on over four decades of extensive fieldwork to offer an in-depth study of the religion of the Kapsiki/Higi, who live in the Mandara Mountains on the border between North Cameroon and Northeast Nigeria. Concentrating on ritual as the core of traditional religion, van Beek shows how Kapsiki/Higi practices have endured through the long and turbulent history of the region.

A History of Borno

Hamman Yaji even recorded his own actions in a diary published in 1995.46 Unfortunately, there is no primary source as rich as the diary of Hamman Yaji for Borno. Under these circumstances, the remote town of Dikwa did not attract much ...

A History of Borno

Borno (in northeast Nigeria) is notorious today as the home of an Islamist terrorist group, Boko Haram, whose insurgency is a major security threat, but it was once the heartland of the Kanuri-speaking royal empire of Kanem-Borno, renowned throughout Africa and beyond, which in its later incarnation, the Bornu Empire, lasted from 1380 to 1893. This book offers the reader the first modern history of Borno, drawing upon sources in London, Berlin, Paris, Kaduna and Maiduguri and recently released 'migrated archives'. As its longevity suggests, what is particularly remarkable about Borno is the permanence of its boundaries-its territorial integrity-which dates back centuries, and the political and social identities that such borders framed in the minds of its inhabitants.

Africa

The Diary of Hamman Yaji . Bloomington IN : Indiana University Press . Wheare , Joan . 1950. The Nigerian Legislative Council . London : Faber & Faber . Zachernuk , Philip . 2000. Colonial Subjects : an African intelligentsia and ...

Africa

Includes Proceedings of the Executive council and List of members, also section "Review of books".

Jih d in West Africa during the Age of Revolutions

J. H. Vaughan and A. H. M. KirkGreene, eds., The Diary of Hamman Yaji: Chronicle of a West African Ruler (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995); and Nicholas David, “A Close Reading of Hamman Yaji's Diary: Slave Raiding and ...

Jih  d in West Africa during the Age of Revolutions

In Jihād in West Africa during the Age of Revolutions, a preeminent historian of Africa argues that scholars of the Americas and the Atlantic world have not given Africa its due consideration as part of either the Atlantic world or the age of revolutions. The book examines the jihād movement in the context of the age of revolutions—commonly associated with the American and French revolutions and the erosion of European imperialist powers—and shows how West Africa, too, experienced a period of profound political change in the late eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries. Paul E. Lovejoy argues that West Africa was a vital actor in the Atlantic world and has wrongly been excluded from analyses of the period. Among its chief contributions, the book reconceptualizes slavery. Lovejoy shows that during the decades in question, slavery expanded extensively not only in the southern United States, Cuba, and Brazil but also in the jihād states of West Africa. In particular, this expansion occurred in the Muslim states of the Sokoto Caliphate, Fuuta Jalon, and Fuuta Toro. At the same time, he offers new information on the role antislavery activity in West Africa played in the Atlantic slave trade and the African diaspora. Finally, Jihād in West Africa during the Age of Revolutions provides unprecedented context for the political and cultural role of Islam in Africa—and of the concept of jihād in particular—from the eighteenth century into the present. Understanding that there is a long tradition of jihād in West Africa, Lovejoy argues, helps correct the current distortion in understanding the contemporary jihād movement in the Middle East, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Africa.

Honour in African History

Hamman Yaji , emir of Madagali on the south - eastern frontier of the Sokoto Caliphate , kept a diary recording not only the capture of 2,016 slaves in raids between 1912 and 1920 but his brutality towards them .

Honour in African History

This is the first published account of the role played by ideas of honour in African history from the fourteenth century to the present day. It argues that appreciation of these ideas is essential to an understanding of past and present African behaviour. Before European conquest, many African men cultivated heroic honour, others admired the civic virtues of the patriarchal householder, and women honoured one another for industry, endurance, and devotion to their families. These values both conflicted and blended with Islamic and Christian teachings. Colonial conquest fragmented heroic cultures, but inherited ideas of honour found new expression in regimental loyalty, respectability, professionalism, working-class masculinity, the changing gender relationships of the colonial order, and the nationalist movements which overthrew that order. Today, the same inherited notions obstruct democracy, inspire resistance to tyranny, and motivate the defence of dignity in the face of AIDS.

Biographies Between Spheres of Empire

The Diary of Hamman Yaji: Chronicle of a West African Muslim Ruler. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995. Watson, Ruth. ““What is Our Intelligence, Our School Going and Our Reading of Books without Getting Money?

Biographies Between Spheres of Empire

Biographical research can illuminate imperial and colonial history. This is particularly true of Africa, where empires competed with one another and colonial society was characterised by rigid divisions. In this book, five biographical studies explore how, in the course of their lives, interpreters, landowners, students and traders navigated the boundaries between the various spaces of the colonial world. With a focus on African life worlds, the authors show the disruptions and constraints as well as the new options and forms of mobility that resulted from colonial rule. This book was originally published as a special issue of The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth Studies.

Africa s Hidden Histories

The Diary of Hamman Yaji: ... “Diary.” London Review of Books, November 16, 32–33. Westermann, D. 1943. Autobiographies d'Africains. Trans. L. Homburger. ... PART ONE Diaries,Letters, and the Constitution of the Self “MY 24 ...

Africa s Hidden Histories

'Africa's Hidden Histories' takes a private and personal look into the world of everyday Africans, as they put pen to paper. As it explores the innovative, intense, and sociable interest in reading and writing, the text opens new avenues for understanding a rich and hidden history of Africa's creative expression.

West African Narratives of Slavery

The Diary of Hamman Yaji: Chronicle of a West African Muslim Ruler. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995. “Völlingen Zerstörung unsrer Station Wegbe.” Monatsblatt der Norddeutschen Missions-Gesellschaft 19, no. 225 (1869): 1006.

West African Narratives of Slavery

Slavery in Africa existed for hundreds of years before it was abolished in the late 19th century. Yet, we know little about how enslaved individuals, especially those who never left Africa, talked about their experiences. Collecting never before published or translated narratives of Africans from southeastern Ghana, Sandra E. Greene explores how these writings reveal the thoughts, emotions, and memories of those who experienced slavery and the slave trade. Greene considers how local norms and the circumstances behind the recording of the narratives influenced their content and impact. This unprecedented study affords unique insights into how ordinary West Africans understood and talked about their lives during a time of change and upheaval.

Telling Stories Making Histories

The Journal of African History. 27, 2 (1986): 203–13. ———. Narrating Our Pasts. The Social Construction of Oral History ... The Diary of Hamman Yaji, Chronicle of a West African Muslim Ruler. Bloomington. Indiana University Press. 1995.

Telling Stories  Making Histories


Slavery and Colonial Rule in Africa

The Diary of Hamman Yaji. Chronicle of a West African Ruler (Bloomington, Indiana, 1995). Richard Goodridge, 'Slavery, Abolition and Political Reform in Northern Cameroons to 1937', in IdentifYing Enslaved Africans.

Slavery and Colonial Rule in Africa

This book brings together a series of new case studies, some by young scholars, others by widely published authors. All are based on original research and designed to enhance our understanding of the process of the abolition of slavery in Africa at the grass-roots level. Part of the studies are on new areas of interest such as the German colonies and the Algerian Sahara. Others throw new light on questions already debated, such as emancipation of the Gold Coast. Some focus on the impact of abolition on particular groups of slaves, such as the royal slaves in Nigeria and concubines in Morocco. Among the themes considered is the role of slaves in their own emancipation, the short and long-term results of abolition, the role of the League of Nations, and the vestiges of slavery in Africa today.

What Is a Slave Society

The Diary of Hamman Yaji: Chronicle of a West African Ruler. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Vera, D. 1995. “Dalla 'villa perfecta' alla villa di Palladio: sulle trasformazioni del sistema agrario in Italia fra principato e ...

What Is a Slave Society

The practice of slavery has been common across a variety of cultures around the globe and throughout history. Despite the multiplicity of slavery's manifestations, many scholars have used a simple binary to categorize slave-holding groups as either 'genuine slave societies' or 'societies with slaves'. This dichotomy, as originally proposed by ancient historian Moses Finley, assumes that there were just five 'genuine slave societies' in all of human history: ancient Greece and Rome, and the colonial Caribbean, Brazil, and the American South. This book interrogates this bedrock of comparative slave studies and tests its worth. Assembling contributions from top specialists, it demonstrates that the catalogue of five must be expanded and that the model may need to be replaced with a more flexible system that emphasizes the notion of intensification. The issue is approached as a question, allowing for debate between the seventeen contributors about how best to conceptualize the comparative study of human bondage.

Collective Mobilisations in Africa Mobilisations collectives en Afrique

The Diary of Hamman Yaji: Chronicle of a West African Muslim Ruler. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995. Yusuf, Muhammad. Hādhihi ʾAqīdatunā wa-Manhaj Daʾwatinā. Maiduguri, no pub., 2009.[Unpublished English translation by Sally ...

Collective Mobilisations in Africa   Mobilisations collectives en Afrique

Collective Mobilisation In Africa. Enough Is Enough! is a collection of empirical studies describing the range of protests modes in Africa. Mobilisations collectives en Afrique. Ça suffit! est un ouvrage qui s’appuie sur des études de cas empiriques pour décrire la pluralité des modes de contestation en Afrique.

Transformations in Slavery

The Diary of Hamman Yaji : Chronicle of a West African Muslim Ruler . Bloomington Vellut , Jean - Luc . 1972. Notes sur le Lunda et la frontière luso - africaine . Études d'his- toire africaine , 3 : 61-166 1975.

Transformations in Slavery

This book examines how indigenous African slavery developed within an international context.