The Doctor s Monsters

The book also contains a comprehensive glossary of the creatures seen in Doctor Who. It is a must for any fan of the series.

The Doctor s Monsters

Doctor Who has been on global television screens for nearly fifty years, and many of its most memorable protagonists have been its monsters, The Daleks, Cybermen, Slitheen, the Sonterans, Ood, Wiirrn, and others. Entertainingly and provocatively written, and introduced by Who scriptwriter Paul Cornell, The Doctor's Monsters takes a new look at these and many other creatures, and asks what inspired them and what lies behind them. If the Daleks are based on ideas of genetic purity, and the Cybermen on fears of transplant surgery, what about the Autons, the Zarbi, or the Weeping Angels? Science fiction critic Graham Sleight examines stories from the whole of Doctor Who's history to give this unique perspective on the series. Why are we so scared of monsters? Why do they look and act the way they do? How do they reflect the time and place that the series is broadcast in? Along the way, the book provides a history - from an unusual angle - of how this most enduring of TV science fiction series has created and recreated itself. The book also contains a comprehensive glossary of the creatures seen in Doctor Who. It is a must for any fan of the series.

The Monster Doctor

A blob with a cold? A yeti with a sore foot? Then book an appointment with the MONSTER DOCTOR. No THING too small, no creature too big! Ozzy is just an ordinary human boy – until he gets a job at the monster doctor's surgery!

The Monster Doctor

Are you . . . A dragon with indigestion? A blob with a cold? A yeti with a sore foot? Then book an appointment with the MONSTER DOCTOR. No THING too small, no creature too big! Ozzy is just an ordinary human boy – until he gets a job at the monster doctor's surgery! He's now spending his summer helping the doctor cure her strange and wonderful monster-patients, and he has to find a way to help her save the surgery . . . The first in a howlingly hilarious series of monster adventures written and illustrated by John Kelly that will have you laughing your head off . . . literally. Don't miss Ozzy's next adventure in The Monster Doctor: Revolting Rescue!

Doctor Who and the Cave Monsters

The Doctor Gets a Message Liz Shaw crossed the UNIT headquarters
quadrangle as she came from the Communications Office, the scribbled note in
her hand. She saw Corporal Grover making for the Armament Room. She called: '
Corporal ...

Doctor Who and the Cave Monsters

UNIT is called in to investigate security at a secret research centre buried under Wenley Moor. Unknown to the Doctor and his colleagues, the work at the centre has woken a group of Silurians - intelligent reptiles that used to be the dominant life form on Earth in prehistoric times. Now they have woken, the Silurians are appalled to find 'their' planet populated by upstart apes. The Doctor hopes to negotiate a peace deal, but there are those on both sides who cannot bear the thought of humans and Silurians living together. As UNIT soldiers enter the cave systems, and the Silurians unleash a deadly plague that could wipe out the human race, the battle for planet Earth begins. This novel is based on 'The Silurians', a Doctor Who story which was originally broadcast from 31 January-14 March 1970. Featuring the Third Doctor as played by Jon Pertwee, his companion Liz Shaw and the UNIT organisation commanded by Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart.

Love and Monsters

Love and Monsters is also the story of how the ambitious producer, John Nathan-Turner, assigned to the programme in 1979, produced a visually-excessive programme for a tele-literate fanbase, and how this style changed the ways in which ...

Love and Monsters

Much has been written about how fans relate to their favourite programmes, but there have been few historical accounts of how specific fandoms change over time. Scholar and Doctor Who fan Miles Booy has written the first historical account of the public interpretation of Doctor Who. Love and Monsters begins in 1979 with the publication of Doctor Who Weekly, the magazine that was to start a chain of events which would see creative fans taking control of the merchandise and even of the programme’s massively successful twenty-first-century reboot. From the twilight of Tom Baker’s years, up to the newest Doctor, Matt Smith, Miles Booy explores the shifting meaning of Doctor Who across the years. His account ranges from the Third Doctor’s suggestion that we should read the Bible, via costumed fans on television, to the 2010 general election in Britain. Love and Monsters is also the story of how the ambitious producer, John Nathan-Turner, assigned to the programme in 1979, produced a visually-excessive programme for a tele-literate fanbase, and how this style changed the ways in which Doctor Who can be read. The Doctor’s world has never been bigger, inside or out!

Doctor Who The Monster Vault

Doctor Who's biggest and most comprehensive monster guide yet, The Monster Vault takes you on the ultimate tour of the Whoniverse, discovering and cataloguing every wonderful and terrifying creature the Doctor has ever encountered.

Doctor Who  The Monster Vault

You're going to need a bigger sofa... Doctor Who's biggest and most comprehensive monster guide yet, The Monster Vault takes you on the ultimate tour of the Whoniverse, discovering and cataloguing every wonderful and terrifying creature the Doctor has ever encountered. From the notorious Daleks, to evil Stenza warrior Tzim-Sha and the ancient Thijarians, The Monster Vault features in-depth profiles on each monster, showing the Doctor's most dangerous enemies in their natural habitat and unveiling their secret histories. You will also discover how monsters were created and designed, behind-the-scenes secrets, unseen details from the original scripts, case studies and rare artwork. This lavish and visually stunning book provides an unrivalled wealth of information, allowing you to explore the rich history of Doctor Who and expand your knowledge and understanding of characters old and new.

Doctor Who and the Loch Ness Monster

The Doctor drove his borrowed land-rover out of the village, and headed for
Tulloch Moor. His plan was very simple. He would make the monster chase him
for as long as he could, to give the Brigadier and his men the best possible
chance of ...

Doctor Who and the Loch Ness Monster

Centuries ago, a Zygon spaceship crash landed in Loch Ness. Now, with their home planet destroyed, the alien creatures plan to take over Earth. Their most powerful weapon is a huge armoured dinosaur-like creature of terrifying power that they brought to earth as an embryo - the Loch Ness Monster. The Doctor, Sarah and Harry soon discover that the Zygons have another weapon. They can assume the identity of any human they capture. Who knows which of their friends might really be a Zygon? UNIT faces one of its toughest battles as Broton, Warlord of the Zygons, puts his plan into action and the Loch Ness Monster attacks. This novel is based on a Doctor Who story which was originally broadcast from 30 August to 20 September 1975. Featuring the Fourth Doctor as played by Tom Baker, with his companions Sarah Jane Smith and Harry Sullivan and the UNIT organisation commanded by Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart

Doctor Who

The Doctor Who: A Book of Monsters takes you behind the scenes of Doctor Who to meet the monsters and their makers.

Doctor Who

They lumbered through space, lurched from the sea, slimed along ventilator shafts and even visited St Paul's Cathedral. They were the scourge of the Doctor's many lives: they were the monsters. Sending millions of children scurrying behind the sofa each week, Doctor Who has been host to same of the mast weird and wonderful species to emerge from the imagination. Daleks, Ice Warriors, Sea Devils, Cybermen... whether they dreamed of intergalactic conquest or simply wanted to survive, the Doctor has met them all. The Doctor Who: A Book of Monsters takes you behind the scenes of Doctor Who to meet the monsters and their makers.

Doctor Who A British Alien

outlets for satire in the show.31 He argues, for instance, that the figure of the
monster is key, functioning allegorically to ... Such self-doubt is reflected by
Doctor Who sometimes portraying humans as being worse than monsters; for
instance, ...

Doctor Who  A British Alien

This book argues that Doctor Who, the world’s longest-running science fiction series often considered to be about distant planets and monsters, is in reality just as much about Britain and Britishness. Danny Nicol explores how the show, through science fiction allegory and metaphor, constructs national identity in an era in which identities are precarious, ambivalent, transient and elusive. It argues that Doctor Who’s projection of Britishness is not merely descriptive but normative—putting forward a vision of what the British ought to be. The book interrogates the substance of Doctor Who’s Britishness in terms of individualism, entrepreneurship, public service, class, gender, race and sexuality. It analyses the show’s response to the pressures on British identity wrought by devolution and separatist currents in Scotland and Wales, globalisation, foreign policy adventures and the unrelenting rise of the transnational corporation.

Who Travels with the Doctor

The Doctor's Monsters: Meanings of the Monstrous in Doctor Who. London: I. B.
Taurus, 2012. Smith, Donna Marie. “Why the Doctor and Rose Tyler Kant Be
Together.” In Doctor Who and Philosophy, edited by Courtland Lewis and Paula ...

Who Travels with the Doctor

Throughout the long-running BBC series Doctor Who, the Doctor has rarely been alone--his companions are essential. Male or (mostly) female, alien or (mostly) human, young or old (none as old as he), the dozens of companions who have travelled with him over the past 50 years have served as sympathetic proxies for the audience. Through their adventures the companions are perfected, facing danger and thus discovering their strengths and weaknesses. Yet they all pay a price, losing their innocence and sometimes their lives. This collection of new essays examines the role of the companion as an intermediate between viewers and the Doctor. The contributors discuss who travels with the Doctor and why, how they interact, how the companions influence the narrative and how their journeys change them.

Mad Doctors Monsters and Mummies

The Monster and the Girl 1940 Paramount Pictures Producer Jack Moss Director
Stuart Heisler Story from the silent screenplay Go and Get It by Marion Fairfax
Screenplay Stuart Anthony Camera Victor Milner Art Directors Hans Dreier ...

Mad Doctors  Monsters and Mummies


Monsters Under the Bed and Other Childhood Fears

EXPOSURE Now it is your child's turn to visit the doctor. Arrange a series of
experiences that will acquaint your child with the doctor and medical procedures
when she is well. Explain to the medical staff your purpose and discuss what will
 ...

Monsters Under the Bed and Other Childhood Fears

A step-by-step manual designed to help parents cope with children's fears; Monsters Under the Bed and Other Childhood Fears discusses common fears, how to respond to childhood anxieties, and other ways to deal with frightened children. “With the culture getting scarier and parents getting busier, there is a growing need to help parents understand and cope with childhood fears. This thoughtful and practical work fulfills that need extraordinarily well.”—Stan and Jan Berenstain, authors of The Berenstain Bears children's book series This book is about how to respond to your child's fears. Most children experience fears of the dark, strangers, unidentified noises, and numerous other things for a short time and then they pass. By supporting your child and filling in the gaps in her knowledge, you can minimize most of the normal childhood fears many children experience. By preparing your child in advance for the new situations she must meet, you may be able to avoid new fears.—From the Introduction Praise for Monsters Under the Bed “The authors of Monsters Under the Bed have created a great resource for parents to help their children. The fun parti s that some of the basic wisdom in this book may also apply when the occasional wayward monster slips under an adult bed.”—Sheryl Leach, president of The Lyons Group, creator of Barney “Fears often annoy, disturb, and sometimes even prevent a child from enjoying childhood. At no time are fears a laughing matter. This book offers parents a variety of clever suggestions on how to help their child 'slay' the ubiquitous monsters that lurk under the bed, in the hall, and outside the window. Today's concerned but busy parents will appreciate the straightforward yet family-oriented language of this book.”—Ted Ayllon, Ph.D., professor of psychology and special education, Georgia State University; author, with Mori Freed, of Stopping Baby's Colic

Doctor Who

GO FURTHER Books The Doctor's Monsters: Meanings of the Monstrous in
Doctor Who Graham Sleight (London and New York: l.B. Tauris, 2012) Love and
Monsters: The Doctor Who Experience, 1979 to the Present Miles Booy (London
and ...

Doctor Who

Since its premiere in November 1963, the classic British television program Doctor Who has been a cornerstone of popular culture for half a century. From the earliest “Exterminate!” to the recent “Allons-y!,” from the white-haired grandfather to the wide-grinned youth, the show has depicted the adventures of a time-traveling, dual-hearted, quick-witted, and multi-faced hero as he battles Daleks, Cybermen, Sontarans, and all manner of nasties. And, like its main character, who can regenerate his body and change his appearance, Doctor Who fandom has developed and changed significantly in the fifty years since its inception. In this engaging and insightful collection, fans and scholars from around the globe explore fan fiction, fan videos, and fan knitting, as well as the creation of new languages. As multifaceted as the character himself, Doctor Who fans come in many forms, and this book investigates thoroughly the multitude of fandoms, fan works, and fan discussions about this always-surprising and energetic program. Featuring full color images of fan work and discussions of both classic and New Who fandom, this book takes reader on a journey of discovery into one of the largest worldwide fan audiences that has ever existed. Thoughtful, insightful, and readable, this is one of only a few—and certainly one of the best—guides to Doctor Who fan culture and is certain to appeal to the show's many ardent fans across the globe.

Doctor Who One Doctor Two Hearts

Learn your 1, 2, 3 across the stars, with the help of the Doctor and friends! One Doctor. Two Hearts. Three Knocks. Four Daleks . . . A Doctor Who counting book with a timey-wimey twist on every page!

Doctor Who  One Doctor  Two Hearts

Learn your 1, 2, 3 across the stars, with the help of the Doctor and friends! One Doctor. Two Hearts. Three Knocks. Four Daleks . . . A Doctor Who counting book with a timey-wimey twist on every page! Featuring Doctors, companions and monsters both past and present, kids of all ages will love this Doctor Who numbers book. In the wonderful style of T is for Tardis, this includes stunning original illustrations, in a retro style, on every page

Doctor Who and Philosophy

Roman Altshuler addresses Davros's claim that the Doctor is “the destroyer of
worlds” (“Journey's End,” 2008). ... one of Rassilon's crown jewels, Michelle
Saint's and Peter A. French's essay “Blink: Monsters, Horror and the Carroll
Thesis.

Doctor Who and Philosophy

Not only is Doctor Who the longest-running science fiction TV show in history, but it has also been translated into numerous languages, broadcast around the world, and referred to as the “way of the future” by some British politicians. The Classic Doctor Who series built up a loyal American cult following, with regular conventions and other activities. The new series, relaunched in 2005, has emerged from culthood into mass awareness, with a steadily growing viewership and major sales of DVDs. The current series, featuring the Eleventh Doctor, Matt Smith, is breaking all earlier records, in both the UK and the US. Doctor Who is a continuing story about the adventures of a mysterious alien known as “the Doctor,” a traveller of both time and space whose spacecraft is the TARDIS (Time and Relative Dimensions in Space), which from the outside looks like a British police telephone box of the 1950s. The TARDIS is “bigger on the inside than on the outside”—actually the interior is immense. The Doctor looks human, but has two hearts, and a knowledge of all languages in the universe. Periodically, when the show changes the leading actor, the Doctor “regenerates.”

Extinct Monsters

However , the workmen in the quarry were stimulated by suitable rewards , and at
length the doctor's efforts resulted in the discovery of teeth which displayed the
curious serrated edges , and the entire form of the unused crown . Having ...

Extinct Monsters

List of British localities where remains of the mammoth have been discovered p. [258]-260.

The Me Monsters

... basement room underneath the typewriter repair shop where my grandfather
worked for fifty years i was a normal looking child with a shock of black hair and
toes that pointed inwards like a question mark the doctors bound them with
splints ...

The  Me   Monsters

Grizzliness is out there. Every child has the makings of mischievousness, and can be lured into committing dastardly deeds. The six stories in each of the Grizzly Tales books show the rise and hard fall of vile and villainous children. We have completely reinvented Grizzly Tales for today's readers - ingenious concepts to link the separate stories, new design and illustrations, new accessible formats, but still capturing Jamie Rix's legendary brilliance for creating stories that linger in the mind long after the lights go out at night! The third title in the all-new Grizzly Tales series captures the crimes of the 'ME!' monsters - those vain, selfish, greedy little children who want only the best for themselves, usually at the expense of everyone else. Hear the shrill explosion of breaking glass as all those mirrors shatter one by one!

Hideous Progeny

looking at his reflection, again aligns viewers with the doctor-monster and indicts
them in the visual production of monstrosity. But it is an earlier mirror scene that
first reaches out to spectators and insists on their participation in the production ...

Hideous Progeny

Twisted bodies, deformed faces, aberrant behavior, and abnormal desires characterized the hideous creatures of classic Hollywood horror, which thrilled audiences with their sheer grotesqueness. Most critics have interpreted these traits as symptoms of sexual repression or as metaphors for other kinds of marginalized identities, yet Angela M. Smith conducts a richer investigation into the period's social and cultural preoccupations. She finds instead a fascination with eugenics and physical and cognitive debility in the narrative and spectacle of classic 1930s horror, heightened by the viewer's desire for visions of vulnerability and transformation. Reading such films as Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), Freaks (1932), and Mad Love (1935) against early-twentieth-century disability discourse and propaganda on racial and biological purity, Smith showcases classic horror's dependence on the narratives of eugenics and physiognomics. She also notes the genre's conflicted and often contradictory visualizations. Smith ultimately locates an indictment of biological determinism in filmmakers' visceral treatments, which take the impossibility of racial improvement and bodily perfection to sensationalistic heights. Playing up the artifice and conventions of disabled monsters, filmmakers exploited the fears and yearnings of their audience, accentuating both the perversity of the medical and scientific gaze and the debilitating experience of watching horror. Classic horror films therefore encourage empathy with the disabled monster, offering captive viewers an unsettling encounter with their own impairment. Smith's work profoundly advances cinema and disability studies, in addition to general histories concerning the construction of social and political attitudes toward the Other.

Imagining Monsters

Rumors grew on rumors. For over a week after her arrival, London awaited the
birth of a new rabbit. None was forthcoming. On 7 December, Mary Toft,
threatened by several skeptical doctors and a menacing justice of the peace,
confessed ...

Imagining Monsters

In 1726, an illiterate woman from Surrey named Mary Toft announced that she had given birth to 17 rabbits. This study recreates the story of this incident and shows how it illuminates 18th-century beliefs about the power of imagination and the problems of personal identity.

Who Is the Doctor

Human Nature that we see the first true literary adaptation of Doctor Who from
another medium. ... In Series Two, “The Girl in the Fireplace” has an exchange
where the Doctor says that monsters have nightmares about him, which is a line
from ...

Who Is the Doctor

“A joyful celebration of fan love. Unofficial episode guides don’t come much more engaging than this.” —Benjamin Cook, co-author of Doctor Who: The Writer’s Tale Doctor Who was already the world’s longest-running science fiction series when it returned in 2005 to huge success. Enormously popular, the BBC show encompasses multiple other genres, from horror to comedy to action and historical adventure, and is loved for its uniquely British wit and clever scripting. Its hero, its monsters, and even its theme song have become pop culture icons. In this volume covering six seasons of the new series, two Doctor Who experts provide insights into everything from the history of the show, including Daleks, Cybermen, and the eight Classic Series Doctors, to a detailed episode guide. As Neil Gaiman complained to the authors, “I have just lost four hours to your blasted book. And I only meant to glance at it.” Allons-y!

Monsters Inc Monsters Get Scared of Doctors Too

Want to hear a secret?

Monsters  Inc  Monsters Get Scared of Doctors  Too

Want to hear a secret? Monsters get scared sometimes, too! Sulley has a bad cold and needs to get better quick so he can go back to work. But the big furry monster is afraid to go to the doctor! Will Sulley muster up the courage to get the help he needs?