The Echoes The Times The Poetry

The Echoes, The Times, The Poetry”, isa book of poems written and revised overthe past two years. They are poems of recovery from mental illness, addiction, some humorous, some sarcastic, and poemsof protest about the war, the system, ...

The Echoes The Times The Poetry

This book is recovery poetry for all people- drugs, emotional illness, war, the system. The author is determined to get her voice out in print to show you that there is therapy in poetry. She has experienced hardship, problems with the system, legal trouble, illness, and drugs. But all of these trials in her life are what really paved the road and gave her the degree to publish such a book. A very powerful, very real, book that needs to be shared with the public.

The Echoes the Times the Poetry

Over the last few years as the twilight of her life approaches Lydia related bits and pieces of the terrible events she experienced during WWII and of the beautiful life she had before.

The Echoes the Times the Poetry

Over the last few years as the twilight of her life approaches Lydia related bits and pieces of the terrible events she experienced during WWII and of the beautiful life she had before. I am proud to be the person she trusted enough to finally let her story be written. Lydia is not Jewish. She was a young Catholic teenager from Czechoslovakia, when she was brutally abducted from a private, parochial school for girls in Vienna, raped and forced into slave labor. After escaping her Nazi tormentors, she sought refuge with her aunt in Switzerland. Then not having heard from her family, she decided to make a dangerous journey home to Prague. During her travels she was befriended by a dog, a guardian angel, that helped her make the arduous trip back home, only to lose the dog near the journeys end and find that her family was devastated. Her family had been very wealthy and influential, friendly with the popular Czech President Mazaryk. Her terrible experiences left her vulnerable to men and she learned of the double standard facing a woman in her society. She was forced to leave Prague when the ruthless Stalinist communist came to liberate Prague (which was in actuality a takeover). Back in Switzerland her aunt tried to secure a future for her and she had a nervous breakdown. Finally, she married an American so she get could start fresh in the amazing land she had traversed in a train as a child.

Women Poetry and Politics in Seventeenth Century Britain

... it in her emblem poems), and her evocation of Hertfordshire rivers also echoes the poems of Spenser and Drayton, inaugurators of what Andrew McRae describes as 'the minor genre of Tudor river poetry'.24 Spenser's The Ruines of Time ...

Women  Poetry  and Politics in Seventeenth Century Britain

Women, Poetry, and Politics in Seventeenth-Century Britain offers a new account of women's engagement in the poetic and political cultures of seventeenth-century England and Scotland, based on poetry that was produced and circulated in manuscript. Katherine Philips is often regarded as the first in a cluster of women writers, including Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn, who were political, secular, literary, print-published, and renowned. Sarah C. E. Ross explores a new corpus of political poetry by women, offering detailed readings of Elizabeth Melville, Anne Southwell, Jane Cavendish, Hester Pulter, and Lucy Hutchinson, and making the compelling case that female political poetics emerge out of social and religious poetic modes and out of manuscript-based authorial practices. Situating each writer in her political and intellectual contexts, from early covenanting Scotland to Restoration England, this volume explores women's political articulation in the devotional lyric, biblical verse paraphrase, occasional verse, elegy, and emblem. For women, excluded from the public-political sphere, these rhetorically-modest genres and the figural language of poetry offered vital modes of political expression; and women of diverse affiliations use religious and social poetics, the tropes of family and household, and the genres of occasionality that proliferated in manuscript culture to imagine the state. Attending also to the transmission and reception of women's poetry in networks of varying reach, Sarah C. E. Ross reveals continuities and evolutions in women's relationship to politics and poetry, and identifies a female tradition of politicised poetry in manuscript spanning the decades before, during, and after the Civil Wars.

Poetry and Voice

totidemque remisit verba locus, dictoque vale, 'vale' inquit et Echo. ...as often as he said 'alas, you boy loved so pointlessly', the place ricocheted those same words back to him, and if he said 'goodbye,' 'goodbye' Echo would say.

Poetry and Voice

Poetry and Voice, with a foreword by Helen Dunmore, is a book of essays which fuses critical and creative treatments of poetic voice. Some contributors focus on critical explorations of voice in work by poets such as John Ashbery, Simon Armitage, Eavan Boland, Carol Ann Duffy, Arun Kolatkar, Don McKay and Dragica Rajčić, and on the musical voices of the lyric tradition and of poetry itself. Vicki Feaver, Jane Griffiths, Philip Gross, Waqas Khwaja, Lesley Saunders and David Swann reflect on their own poetic processes of composition, and the development of the voices of childhood, old age, migration, landscape, bilinguality, and imprisonment. Laurel Cohen-Pfister and Tatjana Bijelić examine the nature of poetic voice in exile, the need for fresh voices after war and new spaces in which poetic voices can be heard. In this international collection, the contributors give rare and generous insights into inner poetic processes and external effects. They engage with artistic debates about developing, losing and appropriating voice in poetry and approach the question of what is ‘finding a voice’ in poetry from multiple angles. The book will interest literary critics, poets, lecturers, and undergraduate and postgraduate students of literature, poetry and creative writing.

Louis MacNeice and the Irish Poetry of his Time

This site, this projective 'Here', is a place the poem makes, and which the stanza builds, and builds upon.82 'Coole Park, 1929' offers a less comforting relationship between place, poet, and posterity than MacNeice imagines for Thomas, ...

Louis MacNeice and the Irish Poetry of his Time

This study focuses on Louis MacNeice's creative and critical engagement with other Irish poets during his lifetime. It draws on extensive archival research to uncover the previously unrecognised extent of the poet's contact with Irish literary mores and networks. Poetic dialogues with contemporaries including F.R. Higgins, John Hewitt, W.R. Rodgers, Austin Clarke, Patrick Kavanagh, John Montague, and Richard Murphy are traced against the persistent rhetoric of cultural and geographical attachment at large in Irish poetry and criticism during the period. These comparative readings are framed by accounts of MacNeice's complex relationship with the oeuvre of W.B. Yeats, which forms a meta-narrative to MacNeice's broader engagement with Irish poetry. Yeats is shown to have been MacNeice's contemporary in the 1930s, reading and reacting to the younger poet's work, just as MacNeice read and reacted to the older poet's work. But the ongoing challenge of the intellectual and formal complexity of Yeats's poetry also provided a means through which MacNeice, across his whole career, dialectically developed various modes through which to confront modernity's cultural, political and philosophical challenges. This book offers new and revisionary perspectives on MacNeice's work and its relationship to Ireland's literary traditions, as well as making an innovative contribution to the history of Irish literature and anglophone poetry in the twentieth century.

Translating the Poetry of the Holocaust

speaker placing herself in a time when it had not ended and imagining a future time. Other poems by Celan use conceptual blending of a more complex nature. The poem 'Espenbaum' (Celan 1952: 15), 'Aspen Tree', mentioned briefly in ...

Translating the Poetry of the Holocaust

Taking a cognitive approach, this book asks what poetry, and in particular Holocaust poetry, does to the reader - and to what extent the translation of this poetry can have the same effects. It is informed by current theoretical discussion and features many practical examples. Holocaust poetry differs from other genres of writing about the Holocaust in that it is not so much concerned to document facts as to document feelings and the sense of an experience. It shares the potential of all poetry to have profound effects on the thoughts and feelings of the reader. This book examines how the openness to engagement that Holocaust poetry can engender, achieved through stylistic means, needs to be preserved in translation if the translated poem is to function as a Holocaust poem in any meaningful sense. This is especially true when historical and cultural distance intervenes. The first book of its kind and by a world-renowned scholar and translator, this is required reading.

Hearing Things

In this poem about poems and echoes, the actual echo of Yeats's “high horse riderless” is hard to ignore. Meanwhile, as metaphors for time and for the timing of poetry, both Stevens's and Plath's poems mix the rote of hoofs on a ...

Hearing Things

Hearing Things is a meditation on sound’s work in literature. Drawing on critical works and the commentaries of many poets and novelists who have paid close attention to the role of the ear in writing and reading, Angela Leighton offers a reconsideration of literature itself as an exercise in hearing. An established critic and poet, Leighton explains how we listen to the printed word, while showing how writers use the expressivity of sound on the silent page. Although her focus is largely on poets—Alfred Tennyson, W. B. Yeats, Robert Frost, Walter de la Mare, Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, Jorie Graham, and Alice Oswald—Leighton’s scope includes novels, letters, and philosophical writings as well. Her argument is grounded in the specificity of the text under discussion, but one important message emerges from the whole: literature by its very nature commands listening, and listening is a form of understanding that has often been overlooked. Hearing Things offers a renewed call for the kind of criticism that, avoiding the programmatic or purely ideological, remains alert to the work of sound in every literary text.

Yeats Eliot Pound and the Politics of Poetry

Ufe to the moment, I would bid them live As roses might, in magic amber laid, Red overwrought with orange and all made One substance and one colour Braving time. Tell her that goes With song upon her lips But sings not out the song, ...

Yeats  Eliot  Pound and the Politics of Poetry

It has long been recognised that there is an apparently paradoxical relationship between the revolutionary poetic style developed by Yeats, Eliot and Pound in the period during and after the First World War, and the reactionary politics with which they were associated in the 1920s and 1930s. Concentrating on their writings in the period up to the 1930s, this study, first published in 1982, helps to resolve the paradox and also provides a much needed reappraisal of the factors influencing their poetic and political development. The work of these poets has usually been seen as deriving from the tradition of continental symbolist poetics. Yeats, Eliot, Pound and the Politics of Poetry will be of interest to students of literature.

Texts and readers in the Age of Marvell

... traced the echoes of the political languages of the times in the poem: Lucan, the Engagement controversy, the voguish (in 1650) Machiavelli, Cromwell's letters to Parliament.14 For Worden, however, 'if not a Royalist poem, ...

Texts and readers in the Age of Marvell

Texts and Readers in the Age of Marvell offers fresh perspectives from leading and emerging scholars on seventeenth-century British literature, with a focus on the surprising ways that texts interacted with writers and readers at specific cultural moments.

The Poetry of Westminster Abbey

A Crowd so nauseous, so profusely lewd, With all the Vices of the Times endu'd, That Cowley's Marble wept to see the ... In tone and theme, it echoes the longer poem by his friend John Dart and was composed about the same time Dart was ...

The Poetry of Westminster Abbey

For centuries, Westminster Abbey has inspired and challenged poets to try to capture and contain the spirit of its haunting beauty and worship-full reverence. This anthology includes poems written between 1413 to the present day, poems which contribute to the greatest epic imaginable in English, Westminster Abbey.

A Companion to Romantic Poetry

In “Tintern Abbey" the novelties are as evident as the echoes. For example, the poem blends borrowings from Edward Young's Night Thoughts (vi. 426; “And half create the wondrous World they see”) with the scientific implications ...

A Companion to Romantic Poetry

Through a series of 34 essays by leading and emerging scholars, A Companion to Romantic Poetry reveals the rich diversity of Romantic poetry and shows why it continues to hold such a vital and indispensable place in the history of English literature. Breaking free from the boundaries of the traditionally-studied authors, the collection takes a revitalized approach to the field and brings together some of the most exciting work being done at the present time Emphasizes poetic form and technique rather than a biographical approach Features essays on production and distribution and the different schools and movements of Romantic Poetry Introduces contemporary contexts and perspectives, as well as the issues and debates that continue to drive scholarship in the field Presents the most comprehensive and compelling collection of essays on British Romantic poetry currently available

Chameleon Poet

supposed to be common among mankind'.71 It is an ideal which Thomas also evokes in one of the enigmatic prose sequences from The Echoes Return Slow, where he recalls how, during his time at Manafon, his faith was shaken by the blinkered ...

Chameleon Poet

Chameleon Poet book goes against the grain of previous readings of the Welsh poet and nationalist R.S. Thomas by revealing him as profoundly indebted to the modes, traditions, and personae of the English literary canon.

The English Poetic Epitaph

subjects by basing the major portion of the epitaph upon a Jonsonian poem concerning a supposedly influential public figure . Lines nine through nineteen echo the structure of Jonson's panegyric epigram to the composer Alfonso ...

The English Poetic Epitaph

In the first major study of the genre, Joshua Scodel shows how English poets have used the poetic epitaph to express their views concerning the power and limitations of poetry as a response to human mortality.

Echoes of Memory

Indeed, for a poet seeking to undo the destructions wreaked by time, the paradox becomes an article of faith. In the cultural sum total, “these wiry shadows of ours are also the shades of those / who spent their destiny for the ...

Echoes of Memory

Timeless lyric poetry by a contemporary European master.

W B Yeats Ezra Pound and the Poetry of Paradise

If language is mortal and earth-bound, a small but real island may be a better theme for the poetry of paradise than the ... its ritualistic tabulation of the elements and the times of day, and its religious echoes do suggest a magic ...

W B  Yeats  Ezra Pound  and the Poetry of Paradise

Emphasizing the interplay of aesthetic forms and religious modes, Sean Pryor's ambitious study takes up the endlessly reiterated longing for paradise that features throughout the works of W. B. Yeats and Ezra Pound. Yeats and Pound define poetry in terms of paradise and paradise in terms of poetry, Pryor suggests, and these complex interconnections fundamentally shape the development of their art. Even as he maps the shared influences and intellectual interests of Yeats and Pound, and highlights those moments when their poetic theories converge, Pryor's discussion of their poems' profound formal and conceptual differences uncovers the distinctive ways each writer imagines the divine, the good, the beautiful, or the satisfaction of desire. Throughout his study, Pryor argues that Yeats and Pound reconceive the quest for paradise as a quest for a new kind of poetry, a journey that Pryor traces by analysing unpublished manuscript drafts and newly published drafts that have received little attention. For Yeats and Pound, the journey towards a paradisal poetic becomes a never-ending quest, at once self-defeating and self-fulfilling - a formulation that has implications not only for the work of these two poets but for the study of modernist literature.

Irish Poetry Since 1950

I kiss the hem of thy garment . I drink to thy health and longevity . Give us war in our time , O Lord ! ' 62 As I have noted , Yeats echoes the same dubious appeal to assert that ' violence ' is required for even the ' wisest man ' to ...

Irish Poetry Since 1950

Irish Poetry since 1950 is a survey of poetry, from Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Britain, and the US, covering the 1950s, the 1960s, the early period of the Troubles up to 1976, the 1980s and the 1990s.

The Poets and Poetry of Scotland

From the Earliest to the Present Time, Comprising Characteristic Selections from the Works of the More Noteworthy Scottish Poets; with Biographical and Critical Notices James Grant Wilson. O the joy of that hour !

The Poets and Poetry of Scotland


Wonderlands of the Avant Garde

Gastev never seems to tire of repeating (which is perhaps ironic) the necessity of minimiz— ing the time and energy wasted on empty talk: “The most complex thought can be laid out in five minutes?84 The title of his final book of poetry ...

Wonderlands of the Avant Garde

In postrevolutionary Russia, as the Soviet government was initiating a program of rapid industrialization, avant-garde artists declared their intent to serve the nascent state and to transform life in accordance with their aesthetic designs. In spite of their professed utilitarianism, however, most avant-gardists created works that can hardly be regarded as practical instruments of societal transformation. Exploring this paradox, Vaingurt claims that the artists’ investment of technology with aesthetics prevented their creations from being fully conscripted into the arsenal of political hegemony. The purposes of avant-garde technologies, she contends, are contemplative rather than constructive. Looking at Meyerhold’s theater, Tatlin’s and Khlebnikov’s architectural designs, Mayakovsky’s writings, and other works from the period, Vaingurt offers an innovative reading of an exceptionally complex moment in the formation of Soviet culture.

Poetry Politics and Promises of Empire

2.5 Synopsis: The Prophetic Voice of 1613 and Millenarian Echoes The politico-cultural nexus of the poet-prophet results from a fusion of biblical, philosophical, ancient and almost scientific reflections on the manifold origins of ...

Poetry  Politics and Promises of Empire

Reihe Super alta perennis. Studien zur Wirkung der Klassischen Antike - Band 007.

T S Eliot The Poems

Time present and time past Are both perhaps present in time future And time future contained in time past . ... and the next lines begin a new sequence of feeling : Footfalls echo in the memory Down the passage which we did not take ...

T  S  Eliot  The Poems

Introduces the poetry of T.S. Eliot, examines his major works, and discusses his style, symbolism, and themes