The Triumph of the Embryo

"This is a clear and engagingly written book," declared Nature, "recommended certainly to nonspecialists, but also to developmental biologists.

The Triumph of the Embryo

"This is a clear and engagingly written book," declared Nature, "recommended certainly to nonspecialists, but also to developmental biologists." Its exploration of how single cells multiply and develop offers an accessible look at a difficult subject. Easy-to-understand descriptions of experimental studies offer fascinating insights into aging, cancer, regeneration, and evolution. 1993 edition.

The Embryo

A variety of new techniques that promise to revolutionize the clinical management of early pregnancy are fully detailed in this state-of-the-art book.

The Embryo

A variety of new techniques that promise to revolutionize the clinical management of early pregnancy are fully detailed in this state-of-the-art book. Leading international researchers describe fast-moving topics such as embryo manipulation and the diagnosis of congenital abnormalities. The technology of assisted reproduction has made it possible to study living embryonic material for the first time, which has led to rapid advances in our understanding of the human embryo's early development. For example, study of the embryo in the test tube has pointed to early pregnancy loss as a possible cause of later infertility. Even more important, diagnostic tests using sophisticated techniques of molecular biology can be run on single cells before the embryo is replaced in the uterus. Another area of advance is the diagnosis of congenital abnormalities in the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. Great improvements have been made in the techniques of chorion villus biopsy and ultrasound imaging. A spectrum of simple biochemical tests performed on the mother's blood can greatly improve the detection of Down syndrome and other chromosome defects. Together with other developments in the fields of molecular biology and endocrinology, these new diagnostic techniques are the beginning of a new age in clinical human genetics and embryology.

God and the Embryo

Short of a ban , why is this not the preferred route for those troubled by embryo research ? It is easy , of course , to see why this is the preferred option for those of us who wish to permit limited research .

God and the Embryo

Discussions and debates over the medical use of stem cells and cloning have always had a religious component. But there are many different religious voices. This anthology on how religious perspectives can inform the difficult issues of stem cell research and human cloning is essential to the discussion. Contributors reflect the spectrum of Christian responses, from liberal Protestant to evangelical to Roman Catholic. The noted moral philosopher, Laurie Zoloth, offers a Jewish approach to cloning, and Sondra Wheeler contributes her perspective on both Jewish and Christian understandings of embryonic stem cell research. In addition to the discussions found here, God and the Embryo includes a series of official statements on stem cell research and cloning from religious bodies, including the Roman Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church in America, the United Methodist Church, the Southern Baptist Convention, the United Church of Christ, the Presbyterian Church (USA), and the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America and the Rabbinical Council of America. "Human Cloning and Human Dignity: An Ethical Inquiry," from the statement of the President's Council on Bioethics, concludes the book. The debates and the discussions will continue, but for anyone interested in the nuances of religious perspectives that make their important contributions to these ethically challenging and important dialectics, God and the Embryo is an invaluable resource.

Soul of the Embryo

We are delighted to announce that this book has been short listed for the prestigious Michael Ramsey prize for the best in theological writing.

Soul of the Embryo

We are delighted to announce that this book has been short listed for the prestigious Michael Ramsey prize for the best in theological writing. For more information please visit: www.michaelramseyprize.org.uk A radical examination of the Christian tradition relating to the human embryo and how this relates to the debate today.In recent years, the moral status of the human embryo has come to the fore as a vital issue for a range of contemporary ethical debates: concerning the over-production, freezing and discarding of embryos in IVF; concerning the use of 'spare' embryos for scientific experimentation; and finally, concerning the prospect of producing clone embryos. These debates have involved not only general philosophical arguments, but also specifically religious arguments. Many participants have attempted to find precedent from the Christian tradition for the positions they wish to defend.It is therefore extraordinary that until The Soul of the Embryo there has been no significant work on the history of Christian reflection on the human embryo. Here, David Albert Jones seeks to tell the story of this unfolding tradition - a story that encompasses many different medical, moral, philosophical and theological themes. He starts by examining the understanding of the embryo in the Hebrew Scritpures, then moves through early Christianity and the Middle Ages to the Reformation and beyond. Finally, Albert Jones considers the application of this developed tradition to contemporary situation and questions which contemporary Christian view or views are best regarded as authentic developments of the tradition and which should be regarded as alien to the tradition.

The Changing Role of the Embryo in Evolutionary Thought

... and he approved Weismann's view that “ the theory of development included the theory of heredity ” ( Lillie 1927 : 361 ) . The lionization of Weismann for having separated heredity from development 154 The Changing Role of the Embryo.

The Changing Role of the Embryo in Evolutionary Thought

In this book Ron Amundson examines two hundred years of scientific views on the evolution-development relationship from the perspective of evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). This perspective challenges several popular views about the history of evolutionary thought by claiming that many earlier authors had made history come out right for the Evolutionary Synthesis. The book starts with a revised history of nineteenth-century evolutionary thought. It then investigates how development became irrelevant with the Evolutionary Synthesis. It concludes with an examination of the contrasts that persist between mainstream evolutionary theory and evo-devo. This book will appeal to students and professionals in the philosophy and history of science, and biology.

A Description of Two Examples of Double Monstrosity Occurring in the Embryo of Birds at a Very Early Period of Incubation

... or combined development which thus occurs must differ in some important respects from that which is natural in a single embryo ; more especially in those instances in which fusion of the combined organs exists to a great extent .

A Description of Two Examples of Double Monstrosity Occurring in the Embryo of Birds at a Very Early Period of Incubation


Developmental Pathology of the Embryo and Fetus

The second half focuses on systemic pathology. The book concludes by examining the autopsy of foetus and embryo and examination of the placenta.

Developmental Pathology of the Embryo and Fetus

An illustrated textbook which describes the developmental pathology of the embryonic, foetal and perinatal periods. The first half of the book discusses such topics as normal development, concepts of embryo-foetal disease and dysmorphology, metabolic, infectious, neoplastic and placental disorders, and the pathology of abortions and multiple gestation. The second half focuses on systemic pathology. The book concludes by examining the autopsy of foetus and embryo and examination of the placenta.

Life Before Birth

Life Before Birth


Conceiving the Embryo

This volume of essays, together with its companion "Creating the Child: " "The Ethics, Law and Practice of Assisted Procreation" (Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, 1996, ISBN 90-411-0207-8) is the result of a concerted action in the BIOMED ...

Conceiving the Embryo

This volume of essays, together with its companion "Creating the Child: " "The Ethics, Law and Practice of Assisted Procreation" (Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, 1996, ISBN 90-411-0207-8) is the result of a concerted action in the BIOMED programme of the European Commission, which was coordinated by the Editor. Clinicians, lawyers and philosophers explore the theoretical and practical problems presented by the new technologies in assisted human reproduction in Eastern, Central and Western Europe. The central question of the status of the human embryo is examined in the light of recent biological discoveries and cultural and legal dissonance within and between the various countries in Europe.

Development of the Avian Embryo

Oxidation ofl-[l4Clpalmitic acid " in the livers and hearts of embryos from 23-, 24-, 25-, and 33- week-old parents at days 15 and 19 of incubation Parental age (weeks) 23 24 25 33 •nmolelminlmg protein. oxidation were determined in ...

Development of the Avian Embryo


Radionuclide Exposure of the Embryo fetus

No. 128. Radionuclide exposure of the embryo/fetus (287 p.) -- no. 129. Recommended screening limits for contaminated surface soil and review of factors relevant to site-specific studies (353 p.) -- no. 130.

Radionuclide Exposure of the Embryo fetus

No. 128. Radionuclide exposure of the embryo/fetus (287 p.) -- no. 129. Recommended screening limits for contaminated surface soil and review of factors relevant to site-specific studies (353 p.) -- no. 130. Biological effects and exposure limits for "hot particles" (258 p.).

Glutathione Synthesis in the Rat Embryo and Visceral Yolk Sac

Diagram showing differential regulation of GSH synthesis in the embryo and the VYS. (1) Interaction of GSH with toxicants such as DEM and diamide. (2) Induction of GCS mRNA by altered thiol status and formation of GSH adducts.

Glutathione Synthesis in the Rat Embryo and Visceral Yolk Sac


Manual of Antenatal Pathology and Hygiene

Excerpt from Manual of Antenatal Pathology and Hygiene: The Embryo The companion volume to this, which appeared in 1902, dealt specially with the diseases of the fœtus; this is concerned with the pathology of the embryo, and, to a small ...

Manual of Antenatal Pathology and Hygiene

Excerpt from Manual of Antenatal Pathology and Hygiene: The Embryo The companion volume to this, which appeared in 1902, dealt specially with the diseases of the fœtus; this is concerned with the pathology of the embryo, and, to a small extent, with the morbid tendencies of the germ. The two volumes are intended to give the reader an idea of the whole extent and variety of the pathological processes of antenatal life. The pathology of the embryo is practically synonymous with the subject of Teratology, or at least with that part of it which deals with single as distinguished from double monsters. Now, Teratology may be studied in three different ways: a simple description may be given of the various monstrosities, with regard to their anatomy, physiology, social and economic results, and the like; or teratological phenomena may be used for the purpose of explaining embryological problems or as a means of clearing up difficulties in the domain of fœtal physiology; or, finally, the whole subject may be approached from the side of causation, and attention be focused upon the genetic aspects of abnormal formations. While not neglecting the first and second methods of study, I have endeavoured to specialise the third plan; for, after all, the most important matter is to reach a solution of the problem of causation, because, if that be reached, there begins to be hope that preventive treatment may be discovered. In my opinion, therefore, Chapters VII. to XII., which discuss teratogenesis on general principles, are the most important of all. The greater part of this volume, then, is given to the consideration of the pathology of the embryo, and only three chapters at the end are set aside for the pathology of the germinal period of life. This fact requires a word or two of explanation. I had originally intended to treat the pathology of the germ, which may, roughly speaking, be regarded as synonymous with double monsters and morbid heredity, on the same scale of completeness as that of the fœtus and embryo; but this, I soon found, would have entailed the writing of a third volume not much smaller in size than the present. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Imagining the Fetus

When the piece was excavated, a tiny fetus with crossed arms filled this cavity.11 By 1200 bce in the highland Basin of Mexico (the location of modern Mexico City, approximately three hundred miles away from Oaxaca), a stylized embryo ...

Imagining the Fetus

In contemporary Western culture, the word "fetus" introduces either a political subject or a literal, medicalized entity. Neither of these frameworks does justice to the vast array of religious literature and oral traditions from cultures around the world in which the fetus emerges as a powerful symbol or metaphor. This volume presents essays that explore the depiction of the fetus in the world's major religious traditions, finding some striking commonalities as well as intriguing differences. Among the themes that emerge is the tendency to conceive of the fetus as somehow independent of the mother's body — as in the case of the Buddha, who is described as inhabiting a palace while gestating in the womb. On the other hand, the fetus can also symbolically represent profound human needs and emotions, such as the universal experience of vulnerability. The authors note how the advent of the fetal sonogram has transformed how people everywhere imagine the unborn today, giving rise to a narrow range of decidedly literal questions about personhood, gender, and disability.