The Emergence of the Arab Movements

Published in the year 1993, The Emergence of the Arab Movements is a valuable contribution to the field of Middle Eastern Studies.

The Emergence of the Arab Movements

Published in the year 1993, The Emergence of the Arab Movements is a valuable contribution to the field of Middle Eastern Studies.

The Arab Movements in World War I

This study surveys the many revolutionary attempts carried out against the Ottoman Empire in the Fertile Cresecnt and the Arabian Peninsula during World War I. Special emphasis is laid upon the subversive activities of the Arab secret ...

The Arab Movements in World War I

This study surveys the many revolutionary attempts carried out against the Ottoman Empire in the Fertile Cresecnt and the Arabian Peninsula during World War I. Special emphasis is laid upon the subversive activities of the Arab secret societies which preceded the outbreak of Sharif Husayn's Arab revolt in 1916. The revolt is thoroughly examined and analyzed, regarding both its military operations and its human composition, which influenced its course.

The Emergence of the Arab Movements

To sum up, the Arab-movement societies did not enjoy support among the Arab population they were working for. In some cases this population was totally unaware of the existence of the societies and it did not hurry to back the societies ...

The Emergence of the Arab Movements

Published in the year 1993, The Emergence of the Arab Movements is a valuable contribution to the field of Middle Eastern Studies.

To Merge Or Not to Merge

The movement towards Arab unity is not a recent phenomenon.

To Merge Or Not to Merge

The movement towards Arab unity is not a recent phenomenon. The conditions and circumstances under which it has taken many of its modern forms change from day to day; nevertheless, the concept of Arab unity is based on a socio-historical rationale as old as the Arab people. Arab unity today reflects this rationale as a historical imperative and symbolically represents a desire to recreate the links to a past which many believe has never been broken. In the broadest sense, this study seeks to clarify the socio-historical rationale upon which the ideological superstructure of Arab unity rests and to show how its unifying thread runs through a seemingly unintelligible diversity of events. Insofar as recent happenings in the Middle East have contributed to the revival of the Arab unit movement, a discussion of its historical genesis cannot be avoided. Still, history itself does not provide the only answers because Arab unity is a response to the heartfelt psychological needs of a historic people. (Author).

Political Ascent

In this book, Emad Shahin offers a comparative analysis of the Islamic movements in Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco, exploring their formation and expansion in the late 1960s and the tenets of their ideology for social transformation. ...

Political Ascent

Islamic movements in North Africa have historically been distinguished from their counterparts in other parts of the Arab world because they have demonstrated a marked willingness to work within the political system and have at times even been officially recognized and allowed to participate in local and national elections. As a result, Islamic thinkers from the Maghrib have produced important writing about the role of Islam and the state, democracy, and nonviolent change. In this book, Emad Shahin offers a comparative analysis of the Islamic movements in Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco, exploring their formation and expansion in the late 1960s and the tenets of their ideology for social transformation. }Islamic movements in North Africa have historically been distinguished from their counterparts in other parts of the Arab world because they have demonstrated a marked willingness to work within the political system and have at times even been officially recognized and allowed to participate in local and national elections. As a result, Islamic thinkers from the Maghrib have produced important writing about the role of Islam and the state, democracy, and nonviolent change. In this book, Emad Shahin offers a comparative analysis of the Islamic movements in Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco, exploring the roots of their development, the nature of their dynamics, and the tenets of their ideology. He argues that the formation and expansion of Islamic movements since the late 1960s has come in response to the marginalization of Islam in state and society and to a perceived failure of imported models of development to resolve socioeconomic problems or to incorporate the Muslim belief system into a workable plan for social transformation. }

The People Want

"The people want .

The People Want

"The people want . . .": This first half of slogans chanted by millions of Arab protesters since 2011 revealed a long-repressed craving for democracy. But huge social and economic problems were also laid bare by the protestors’ demands. Simplistic interpretations of the uprising that has been shaking the Arab world since a young street vendor set himself on fire in Central Tunisia, on 17 December 2010, seek to portray it as purely political, or explain it by culture, age, religion, if not conspiracy theories. Instead, Gilbert Achcar locates the deep roots of the upheaval in the specific economic features that hamper the region’s development and lead to dramatic social consequences, including massive youth unemployment. Intertwined with despotism, nepotism, and corruption, these features, produced an explosive situation that was aggravated by post-9/11 U.S. policies. The sponsoring of the Muslim Brotherhood by the Emirate of Qatar and its influential satellite channel, Al Jazeera, contributed to shaping the prelude to the uprising. But the explosion’s deep roots, asserts Achcar, mean that what happened until now is but the beginning of a revolutionary process likely to extend for many more years to come. The author identifies the actors and dynamics of the revolutionary process: the role of various social and political movements, the emergence of young actors making intensive use of new information and communication technologies, and the nature of power elites and existing state apparatuses that determine different conditions for regime overthrow in each case. Drawing a balance-sheet of the uprising in the countries that have been most affected by it until now, i.e. Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain, Libya and Syria, Achcar sheds special light on the nature and role of the movements that use Islam as a political banner. He scrutinizes attempts at co-opting the uprising by these movements and by the oil monarchies that sponsor them, as well as by the protector of these same monarchies: the U.S. government. Underlining the limitations of the "Islamic Tsunami" that some have used as a pretext to denigrate the whole uprising, Gilbert Achcar points to the requirements for a lasting solution to the social crisis and the contours of a progressive political alternative.

Violent Radical Movements in the Arab World

Violent non-state actors have become almost endemic to political movements in the Middle East and the Horn of Africa. This book examines why they play such a key role and the different ways in which they have developed.

Violent Radical Movements in the Arab World

Violent non-state actors have become almost endemic to political movements in the Middle East and the Horn of Africa. This book examines why they play such a key role and the different ways in which they have developed. Placing them in the context of the region, separate chapters cover the organizations that are currently active, including: The Muslim Brotherhood, The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, Jabhat al-Nusra, Hamas, Hizbullah, the PKK, al-Shabab and the Huthis. The book shows that while these groups are a new phenomenon, they also relate to other key factors including the 'unfinished business' of the colonial and postcolonial eras and tacit encouragement of the Wahhabi/Salafi/jihadi da'wa by some regional powers. Their diversity means violent non-state actors elude simple classification, ranging from 'national' and 'transnational' to religious and political movements. However, by examining their origins, their supporters and their motivations, this book helps explain their ubiquity in the region.

Nation and Religion

This collection of essays addresses these timely issues by providing both a general analysis of the region and more focused country-by-country examples.

Nation and Religion

The Middle East is a complex region where religion, culture and politi are deeply intertwined in a powerful relationship. From the early days of the Arab nationalist experiment to the emergence of Islamic fundamentalism in the early part of this century and beyond, the region's political movements have become a salient feature of its modern history and continue to be the subject of much heated debate and speculation. This collection of essays addresses these timely issues by providing both a general analysis of the region and more focused country-by-country examples. Among the many themes, nationalism and Islamism are re-examined to demonstrate their ongoing relevance and relationship to the presentday Arab context and identity. This is followed by a closer look at Islamist movements in Turkey, Iran, and Tunisia and how these forces may either come to erode the secular state (in the case of Turkey and Tunisia) or bolster the Islamic one (in the case of Iran). The author also examines the fate of the eight remaining monarchies of the Arab world and the conditions of their emergence, consolidation and continuation. By means of a thorough analysis of these important themes, along with country-specific case studies, the author provides a wealth of information that helps towards a comprehensive understanding of the region. 'An absorbing collection of essays ... Halliday's range allows him to make many penetrating cross-cultural comparisons.' New Statesman 'Nation and Religion in the Middle East provides a wealth of information that helps towards a comprehensive understanding of the region.' The Middle East 'A formidable collection.' Times Literary Supplement 'Halliday has proven one of the most wide-ranging and sophisticated analysts of the Middle East, and this collection of essays shows both those traits.' CHOICE

Women s Movements in Post Arab Spring North Africa

From the pre-history of the revolutions to their aftermath, the far-reaching historical and national scope of this collection expands the study of women's movements in North Africa beyond national borders, while still paying close attention ...

Women   s Movements in Post    Arab Spring    North Africa

Centering on women's movements before, during, and after the revolutions, Women's Movements in Post-"Arab Spring" North Africa highlights the broader sources of authority that affected the emergence of new feminist actors and agents and their impact on the sociopolitical landscapes of the region.

Islamic Movements

This book consists of important studies by six leading specialists on Islamic movements, including Hasan Hanafi, Ahmad Moussalli and Radwan Al-Sayyid.

Islamic Movements

Islamic movements have maintained a strong presence in the political and social life of the Arab world since the last century, through the active pursuit of the Islamization of their particular state or society. The strength of the movements has led to clashes and prolonged confrontations with some Arab regimes, which have greatly affected political and social stability in these states. This book consists of important studies by six leading specialists on Islamic movements, including Hasan Hanafi, Ahmad Moussalli and Radwan Al-Sayyid. The analyses focus on the conditions that led to the emergence of the various Islamic movements and the relationships between their thinking and praxis in particular political and social contexts. The contributors also discuss the radical and moderate orientations of these movements, highlighting the reasons behind such approaches and their impact on the current situation in the Arab world.

Islamic Movements in the Arab World 1913 1966 1934 1948

While pan-Islamism is a separate historical theme from Arab nationalism, the goals of both movements were at times intertwined.--From publisher's description.

Islamic Movements in the Arab World  1913 1966  1934 1948

This set examines the progression of pan-Islamic organisations, movements and activists extant in the Arab states in the early 20th century, particularly in the Hijaz (Saudi Arabia), Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Yemen and most of the Maghreb states, together with the involvement of Islamic institutions in regularising and interceding in aspects of both religious and secular life. While pan-Islamism is a separate historical theme from Arab nationalism, the goals of both movements were at times intertwined.--From publisher's description.

Academic Research

Secret Societies and Resistance Movements in the Fertile Crescent I875- I920. Ramat-Gan: Bar-Ilan UP (in press). — The Emergence of the Arab Movements. London: Frank Cass (in press). Zucker, B. “Black Americans' Reaction to the ...

Academic Research


Women s Movements in Post Arab Spring North Africa

From the pre-history of the revolutions to their aftermath, the far-reaching historical and national scope of this collection expands the study of women's movements in North Africa beyond national borders, while still paying close attention ...

Women s Movements in Post  Arab Spring  North Africa

Unexpected and transformative revolutions broke off in North Africa and quickly spread to the Middle East and the rest of the world in 2010 and 2011. Spontaneous, leaderless, youth-driven, and backed by social media, these revolutions called for karamah (dignity) and democracy. Centering on women's movements before, during, and after the revolutions, Women's Movements in Post-"Arab Spring" North Africa highlights the broader sources of authority that affected the emergence of new feminist actors and agents and their impact on the sociopolitical landscapes of the region. Until recently, studies of North African women's movements have focused on aspects of women's achievements one at a time. By providing a comparative analysis, this book is the first to shed light not only on the role that these superstructures play in shaping women's experiences in North Africa, but also on the rich variety of women's responses to authority and their potential contributions to African and global feminist thought. From the pre-history of the revolutions to their aftermath, the far-reaching historical and national scope of this collection expands the study of women's movements in North Africa beyond national borders, while still paying close attention to local characteristics.

Shiism and Politics in the Middle East

Laurence Louër's timely study immediately precedes the outbreak of unrest in Bahrain that triggered the escalation of the so-called Arab Spring of 2011.

Shiism and Politics in the Middle East

Laurence Louër's timely study immediately precedes the outbreak of unrest in Bahrain that triggered the escalation of the so-called Arab Spring of 2011. In addition to issues relating to the role of Shiite Islamist movements in regional politics, she provides context for the Bahraini conflict and Shiism's wider implications as a political force in the Arab Middle East. Louër's study depicts Bahrain's troubles as a phenomenon rooted in local perceptions of injustice rather than in the fallout from Shiite Iran's foreign policies. She more generally argues that, although Iran's Islamic Revolution had an electrifying effect on Shiite movements in Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and the Gulf, local political imperatives ultimately have been the crucial driver of developments within Shiite movements -- though Lebanon's Hezbollah remains an exception. In addition, the rise of lay activists within Shiite movements across the Middle East and the emergence of Shiite anticlericalism have diminished the overwhelming influence of the Shiite clerical institution. Louër ultimately dispels the myth that Iran has determined the politics of Iraq, Bahrain, and other Arab states with significant Shiite populations. As revolution continues to spread across the Middle East, her analysis couldn't be more clarifying or necessary.

Economic Development of the Arab Countries

This volume, edited by Said El-Naggar, is the fifth in a series of seminars dealing with economic issues of particular importance to the Arab countries.

Economic Development of the Arab Countries

This volume, edited by Said El-Naggar, is the fifth in a series of seminars dealing with economic issues of particular importance to the Arab countries. Held in Manama, Bahrain, in February 1993, it covered topics pertaining to economic development of the Arab countries in the nineties. The seven papers that were presented comprised economic reform in the Arab countries, including particularly structural issues; investment policies and capital flows; inter-Arab labor movements; environment and development; development of human resources; and European economic integration. An overview of the topics is presented by the seminar moderator, Said El-Naggar.

When Victory Is Not an Option

And how might their increased involvement affect the political system? In When Victory Is Not an Option, Nathan J. Brown addresses these questions by focusing on Islamist movements in Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, and Palestine.

When Victory Is Not an Option

Throughout the Arab world, Islamist political movements are joining the electoral process. This change alarms some observers and excites other. In recent years, electoral opportunities have opened, and Islamist movements have seized them. But those opportunities, while real, have also been sharply circumscribed. Elections may be freer, but they are not fair. The opposition can run but it generally cannot win. Semiauthoritarian conditions prevail in much of the Arab world, even in the wake of the Arab Spring. How do Islamist movements change when they plunge into freer but unfair elections? How do their organizations (such as the Muslim Brotherhood) and structures evolve? What happens to their core ideological principles? And how might their increased involvement affect the political system? In When Victory Is Not an Option, Nathan J. Brown addresses these questions by focusing on Islamist movements in Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, and Palestine. He shows that uncertain benefits lead to uncertain changes. Islamists do adapt their organizations and their ideologies do bend—some. But leaders almost always preserve a line of retreat in case the political opening fizzles or fails to deliver what they wish. The result is a cat-and-mouse game between dominant regimes and wily movements. There are possibilities for more significant changes, but to date they remain only possibilities.

Terrorist Movements and the Recruitment of Arab Foreign Fighters

This book offers the first detailed, in-depth account of how and why some Arab foreign fighters subsequently became involved in Islamist terrorism.

Terrorist Movements and the Recruitment of Arab Foreign Fighters

This book offers the first detailed, in-depth account of how and why some Arab foreign fighters subsequently became involved in Islamist terrorism. Drawing on a personal dataset of 3,010 Arab foreign fighters compiled using biographies, martyrdom eulogies, and postings on 'jihadi' websites, Terrorist Movements and the Recruitment of Arab Foreign Fighters suggests that the subsequent involvement in Islamist terrorism by some Arab foreign fighters is primarily forged in the crucible of defensive jihad.

Arab Rebirth

An essay on Arab history, life and culture.

Arab Rebirth

An essay on Arab history, life and culture. It moves from pre-Islamic Arabia to 20th-century Morocco, from theology to linguistics, from desert oasis to urban slum, from poetry to the politics of oil, presenting a synoptic portrait of a civilization in the grip of change.

Terrorist Movements and the Recruitment of Arab Foreign Fighters

A History from 1980s Afghanistan to ISIS Roger Warren. jihad subsequently become involved in Islamist terrorist-related activities. Do the situational variables (inherent within a defensive jihad context) affect Western and Arab foreign ...

Terrorist Movements and the Recruitment of Arab Foreign Fighters

This book offers the first detailed, in-depth account of how and why some Arab foreign fighters subsequently became involved in Islamist terrorism. Drawing on a personal dataset of 3,010 Arab foreign fighters compiled using biographies, martyrdom eulogies, and postings on 'jihadi' websites, Terrorist Movements and the Recruitment of Arab Foreign Fighters suggests that the subsequent involvement in Islamist terrorism by some Arab foreign fighters is primarily forged in the crucible of defensive jihad.