The Encyclopedia of Country Music

But it's also an entertaining read for the music's true fans." --Houston Chronicle "This big, handsome volume spans the history of country music, listing not only artists and groups but also important individuals and institutions.

The Encyclopedia of Country Music

Immediately upon publication in 1998, the Encyclopedia of Country Music became a much-loved reference source, prized for the wealth of information it contained on that most American of musical genres. Countless fans have used it as the source for answers to questions about everything from country's first commercially successful recording, to the genre's pioneering music videos, to what conjunto music is. This thoroughly revised new edition includes more than 1,200 A-Z entries covering nine decades of history and artistry, from the Carter Family recordings of the 1920s to the reign of Taylor Swift in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Compiled by a team of experts at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, the encyclopedia has been brought completely up-to-date, with new entries on the artists who have profoundly influenced country music in recent years, such as the Dixie Chicks and Keith Urban. The new edition also explores the latest and most critical trends within the industry, shedding light on such topics as the digital revolution, the shifting politics of country music, and the impact of American Idol (reflected in the stardom of Carrie Underwood). Other essays cover the literature of country music, the importance of Nashville as a music center, and the colorful outfits that have long been a staple of the genre. The volume features hundreds of images, including a photo essay of album covers; a foreword by country music superstar Vince Gill (the winner of twenty Grammy Awards); and twelve fascinating appendices, ranging from lists of awards to the best-selling country albums of all time. Winner of the Best Reference Award from the Popular Culture Association "Any serious country music fan will treasure this authoritative book." --The Seattle Times "A long-awaited, major accomplishment, which educators, historians and students, broadcasters and music writers, artists and fans alike, will welcome and enjoy." --The Nashville Musician "Should prove a valuable resource to those who work in the country music business. But it's also an entertaining read for the music's true fans." --Houston Chronicle "This big, handsome volume spans the history of country music, listing not only artists and groups but also important individuals and institutions." --San Francisco Examiner "Promises to be the definitive historical and biographical work on the past eight decades of country music. Well written and heavily illustratedan unparalleled work, worth its price and highly recommended." --Library Journal

The Encyclopedia of Country Music

INTRODUCTION X ascribing to the music its own traditions and codes. By the time of Hank Williams, the genre was established enough that the great country songwriter felt he could state unequivocally what characterized the music (then ...

The Encyclopedia of Country Music

Immediately upon publication in 1998, the Encyclopedia of Country Music became a much-loved reference source, prized for the wealth of information it contained on that most American of musical genres. Countless fans have used it as the source for answers to questions about everything from country's first commercially successful recording, to the genre's pioneering music videos, to what conjunto music is. This thoroughly revised new edition includes more than 1,200 A-Z entries covering nine decades of history and artistry, from the Carter Family recordings of the 1920s to the reign of Taylor Swift in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Compiled by a team of experts at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, the encyclopedia has been brought completely up-to-date, with new entries on the artists who have profoundly influenced country music in recent years, such as the Dixie Chicks and Keith Urban. The new edition also explores the latest and most critical trends within the industry, shedding light on such topics as the digital revolution, the shifting politics of country music, and the impact of American Idol (reflected in the stardom of Carrie Underwood). Other essays cover the literature of country music, the importance of Nashville as a music center, and the colorful outfits that have long been a staple of the genre. The volume features hundreds of images, including a photo essay of album covers; a foreword by country music superstar Vince Gill (the winner of twenty Grammy Awards); and twelve fascinating appendices, ranging from lists of awards to the best-selling country albums of all time. Winner of the Best Reference Award from the Popular Culture Association "Any serious country music fan will treasure this authoritative book." --The Seattle Times "A long-awaited, major accomplishment, which educators, historians and students, broadcasters and music writers, artists and fans alike, will welcome and enjoy." --The Nashville Musician "Should prove a valuable resource to those who work in the country music business. But it's also an entertaining read for the music's true fans." --Houston Chronicle "This big, handsome volume spans the history of country music, listing not only artists and groups but also important individuals and institutions." --San Francisco Examiner "Promises to be the definitive historical and biographical work on the past eight decades of country music. Well written and heavily illustratedan unparalleled work, worth its price and highly recommended." --Library Journal

Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music

Portraits of performers and photographs of album covers illustrate more than six hundred entries on country stars including Roy Clark, Dolly Parton, and Waylon Jennings

Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music

Portraits of performers and photographs of album covers illustrate more than six hundred entries on country stars including Roy Clark, Dolly Parton, and Waylon Jennings

The Encyclopedia of Country Music

ascribing to the music its own traditions and codes. By the time of Hank Williams, the genre was established enough that the great country songwriter felt he could state unequivocally what characterized the music (then known as "folk").

The Encyclopedia of Country Music

An authoritative encyclopedia of American country music offers nearly 1,300 articles

The Harmony Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music

Profiles such stars as Hank Williams and Patsy Cline, as well as the new country acts

The Harmony Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music

Profiles such stars as Hank Williams and Patsy Cline, as well as the new country acts

The Oxford Handbook of Country Music

You Love it” slogan, 219–220 distributing companies, 502 Fan Fair, 486–487 International Country Music Day, ... 234, 485–486 Country Music Foundation (CMF), 25, 55–83, 77n6, 78n12, 80n51, 312 The Encyclopedia of Country Music, ...

The Oxford Handbook of Country Music

Now in its sixth decade, country music studies is a thriving field of inquiry involving scholars working in the fields of American history, folklore, sociology, anthropology, musicology, ethnomusicology, cultural studies, and geography, among many others. Covering issues of historiography and practice as well as the ways in which the genre interacts with media and social concerns such as class, gender, and sexuality, The Oxford Handbook of Country Music interrogates prevailing narratives, explores significant lacunae in the current literature, and provides guidance for future research. More than simply treating issues that have emerged within this subfield, The Oxford Handbook of Country Music works to connect to broader discourses within the various fields that inform country music studies in an effort to strengthen the area's interdisciplinarity. Drawing upon the expertise of leading and emerging scholars, this Handbook presents an introduction into the historiographical narratives and methodological issues that have emerged in country music studies' first half-century.

Country Music

The Encyclopedia of country Music. Second edition. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Kosser, Michael Acuff-Rose Publishing Nashville: SONY/ATV tree, 2005. (Booklet.) – How Nashville became Music city, usA.

Country Music

The rich and colorful story of America's most popular music and the singers and songwriters who captivated, entertained, and consoled listeners throughout the twentieth century--based on the upcoming eight-part film series to air on PBS in September 2019 This gorgeously illustrated and hugely entertaining history begins where country music itself emerged: the American South, where people sang to themselves and to their families at home and in church, and where they danced to fiddle tunes on Saturday nights. With the birth of radio in the 1920s, the songs moved from small towns, mountain hollers, and the wide-open West to become the music of an entire nation--a diverse range of sounds and styles from honky tonk to gospel to bluegrass to rockabilly, leading up through the decades to the music's massive commercial success today. But above all, Country Music is the story of the musicians. Here is Hank Williams's tragic honky tonk life, Dolly Parton rising to fame from a dirt-poor childhood, and Loretta Lynn turning her experiences into songs that spoke to women everywhere. Here too are interviews with the genre's biggest stars, including the likes of Merle Haggard to Garth Brooks to Rosanne Cash. Rife with rare photographs and endlessly fascinating anecdotes, the stories in this sweeping yet intimate history will captivate longtime country fans and introduce new listeners to an extraordinary body of music that lies at the very center of the American experience.

Country Music A Very Short Introduction

The Encyclopedia of Country Music. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. McCloud, Barry. Definitive Country: The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Country Music and Its Performers. New York: A Perigree Book, 1995. Nash, Alanna.

Country Music  A Very Short Introduction

Country Music: A Very Short Introduction presents a compelling overview of the music and its impact on American culture. Country music has long been a marker of American identity; from our popular culture to our politics, it has provided a soundtrack to our national life. While traditionally associated with the working class, country's appeal is far broader than any other popular music style. While this music rose from the people, it is also a product of the popular music industry, and the way the music has been marketed to its audience is a key part of its story. Key artists, songs, and musical styles are highlighted that are either touchstones for a particular social event (such as Tammy Wynette's "Stand By Your Man," which produced both a positive and negative backlash as a marker of women's roles in society at the beginning of the liberation movement) or that encompass broader trends in the industry (for example, Jimmie Rodgers' "T for Texas" was an early example of the appropriation of black musical forms by white artists to market them to a mainstream audience). While pursuing a basically chronological outline, the book is structured around certain recurring themes (such as rural vs. urban; tradition vs. innovation; male vs. female; white vs. black) that have been documented through the work of country artists from the minstrel era to today. Truly the voice of the people, country music expresses both deep patriotism as well as a healthy skepticism towards the powers that dominate American society. Country Music: A Very Short Introduction illuminates this rich tradition and assesses its legacy in American popular music culture.

Country Music

Definitive Country: The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Country Music and Its Performers. New York: Perigee, 1995. Milsap, Ronnie, and Tom Carter. Almost like a Song. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1990. Morton, David C., and Charles K. Wolfe.

Country Music

This illustrated A-Z guide covers more than 700 country music artists, groups, and bands. Articles also cover specific genres within country music as well as instruments used. Written in a lively, engaging style, the entries not only outline the careers of country music's greatest artists, they provide an understanding of the artist's importance or failings, and a feeling for his or her style. Select discographies are provided at the end of each entry, while a bibliography and indexes by instrument, musical style, genre, and song title round out the work. For a full list of entries, a generous selection of sample entries, and more, visit the Country Music: A Biographical Dictionary website.

Country Music Goes to War

Kingsbury, Paul, ed. The Encyclopedia of Country Music. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. Kingsbury, Paul, and Alan Axelrod, eds. Country: The Music and the Musicians. New York: Abbeville Press, 1988. Knauth, Percy.

Country Music Goes to War

"Listening to the Beat of the Bomb" UPK author Charles Wolfe discusses his work and his new book Country Music Goes to War in the NEW YORK TIMES. While Toby Keith suggests that Americans should unite in support of the president, the Dixie Chicks assert their right to criticize the current administration and its military pursuits. Country songs about war are nearly as old as the genre itself, and the first gold record in country music went to the 1942 war song "There's a Star Spangled Banner Waving Somewhere" by Elton Britt. The essays in Country Music Goes to War demonstrate that country musicians' engagement with significant political and military issues is not strictly a twenty-first-century phenomenon. The contributors examine the output of country musicians responding to America's large-scale confrontation in recent history: World War II, the Korean War, Vietnam, the cold war, September 11, and both conflicts in the Persian Gulf. They address the ways in which country songs and artists have energized public discourse, captured hearts, and inspired millions of minds. Charles K. Wolfe, professor of English and folklore at Middle Tennessee State University, is the author of numerous books and articles on music. James E. Akenson, professor of curriculum and instruction at Tennessee Technological University, is the founder of the International Country Music Conference. Together they have edited the collections The Women of Country Music, Country Music Annual 2000, Country Music Annual 2001, and Country Music Annual 2002.

Country Music s Most Wanted

The Country Music Book . New York : Charles Scribner's Sons , 1985 . McCloud , Barry , et al . Definitive Country : The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Country Music and Its Performers . New York : a Perigee Books , 1995 . McNeil , Alex .

Country Music s Most Wanted

Pick and grin with fun country music trivia

The Concise Encyclopedia of American Radio

Although the Barn Dance gave valuable exposure to country musicians and comics and, in general, helped to establish country music as a commercial force, the show was also important in preserving many of the pre-World War II elements of ...

The Concise Encyclopedia of American Radio

The average American listens to the radio three hours a day. In light of recent technological developments such as internet radio, some argue that the medium is facing a crisis, while others claim we are at the dawn of a new radio revolution. The Concise Encyclopedia of American Radio is an essential single-volume reference guide to this vital and evolving medium. It brings together the best and most important entries from the three-volume Museum of Broadcast Communications Encyclopedia of Radio, edited by Christopher Sterling. Comprised of more than 300 entries spanning the invention of radio to the Internet, The Concise Encyclopedia of American Radio addresses personalities, music genres, regulations, technology, programming and stations, the "golden age" of radio and other topics relating to radio broadcasting throughout its history. The entries are updated throughout and the volume includes nine new entries on topics ranging from podcasting to the decline of radio. The Concise Encyclopedia of American Radio include suggestions for further reading as complements to most of the articles, biographical details for all person-entries, production credits for programs, and a comprehensive index.

The History of Texas Music

399-400; Irwin Stambler and Grelun Landon, eds., Country Music: The Encyclopedia, pp. 504-506; Daniel Cooper, "Tanya Tucker," in Kingsbury, Encyclopedia ofCountry Music, pp. 549-50; Bufwack and Oermann, Finding Her Voice, pp.

The History of Texas Music

The richly diverse ethnic heritage of the Lone Star State has brought to the Southwest a remarkable array of rhythms, instruments, and musical styles that have blended here in unique ways and, in turn, have helped shape the music of the nation and the world. Historian Gary Hartman writes knowingly and lovingly of the Lone Star State’s musical traditions. In the first thorough survey of the vast and complex cultural mosaic that has produced what we know today as “Texas music,” he paints a broad, panoramic view, offers analysis of the origins of and influences on specific genres, profiles key musicians, and provides guidance to additional sources for further information. A musician himself, Hartman draws on both academic and non-academic sources to give a more complete understanding of the state’s remarkable musical history and ethnic community studies with his first-hand knowledge of how important music is as a cultural medium through which human beings communicate information, ideas, emotions, values, and beliefs, and bond together as friends, families, and communities. The History of Texas Music incorporates a selection of well-chosen photographs of both prominent and less-well-known artists and describes not only the ethnic origins of much of Texas music but also the cross-pollination among various genres. Today, the music of Texas—which includes Native American music, gospel, blues, ragtime, swing, jazz, rhythm and blues, conjunto, Tejano, Cajun, zydeco, western swing, honky tonk, polkas, schottsches, rock & roll, rap, hip hop and more—reflects the unique cultural dynamics of the Southwest.

Country

Country on Compact Disc: The Essential Guide to the Music. New York: Grove Press, 1993. ———. The Country Reader. Nashville: CMF/ Vanderbilt University Press, 1996. ———. Encyclopedia of Country Music. New York: Oxford, 1998. Lomax, John.

Country

American country music is a blend of musical traditions, from the balladry and dance tunes of the British Isles to African-American blues and gospel, to minstrel show and Tin Pan Alley commercial tunes, to the music of immigrant Acadian, German, and Hispanic groups, to the ballads of the coal miners and cowboys. Commercial recordings such as the landmark OC Little Old Log Cabin in the LaneOCO recorded by FiddlinOCO John Carson and the WLS National Barn Dance and WSMOCOs Grand Ole Opry helped bring the music of Appalachia, the South, and the West to the attention of the rest of the country. The 1930s and 1940s saw new artists develop new styles, including western swing and honky tonk. Despite several dry spells in country music history, mostly during the 1950s, real country music never died and made a comeback in the 1970s. American Popular Music: Country documents the evolution of this genre as it carved a place for itself in the music industry, one song at a time."

Discovering Country Music

Sing Your Heart Out, Country Boy: Classic Country Songs and Their Inside Stories by the People Who Wrote Them. New York: Dutton, 1975. Ivey, Bill. ... The Encyclopedia of Country Music: Compiled by the Staff of the Country Music ...

Discovering Country Music

Chronicles the evolution of country music in America, providing an account of the reasoning and motives that have determined its path