The End of the Poem

End. of. the. Poem. My plan, as you can see summarized before you in the title of this lecture, is to define a poetic institution that has until now remained unidentified: the end of the poem. To do this, I will have to begin with a ...

The End of the Poem

This book, by one of Italy's most important and original contemporary philosophers, represents a broad, general, and ambitious undertaking--nothing less than an attempt to rethink the nature of poetic language and to rearticulate relationships among theology, poetry, and philosophy in a tradition of literature initiated by Dante. The author presents "literature" as a set of formal or linguistic genres that discuss or develop theological issues at a certain distance from the discourse of theology. This distance begins to appear in Virgil and Ovid, but it becomes decisive in Dante and in his decision to write in the vernacular. His vernacular Italian reaches back through classical allusion to the Latin that was in his day the language of theology, but it does so with a difference. It is no accident that in the Commedia Virgil is Dante's guide. The book opens with a discussion of just how Dante's poem is a "comedy," and it concludes with a discussion of the "ends of poetry" in a variety of senses: enjambment at the ends of lines, the concluding lines of poems, and the end of poetry as a mode of writing this sort of literature. Of course, to have poetry "end" does not mean that people stop writing it, but that literature passes into a period in which it is concerned with its own ending, with its own bounds and limits, historical and otherwise. Though most of the essays make specific reference to various authors of the Italian literary tradition (including Dante, Polifilo, Pascoli, Delfini, and Caproni), they transcend the confines of Italian literature and engage several other literary and philosophical authors (Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, Boethius, the Provençal poets, Mallarmé, and Hölderlin, among others).

The End of the Poem

I'll be concentrating on section 10 of Marina Tsvetayeva's “Poem of the End,” a long, difficult poem of fourteen sections written in 1924 about the impacton her ofprivate strife—the terminationof an adulterous relationship.

The End of the Poem

The End of the Poem contains the fifteen lectures delivered by Paul Muldoon as Oxford Professor of Poetry, from 1999 to 2004. Rather than individual and discrete performances, these lectures form a dazzling set of variations around the sustained theme of 'the end of the poem'. Each lecture explores a different sense of an ending: whether a poem can ever be a free-standing structure, read and written in isolation from other poems; whether a poem's line-endings are forms of closure (and where this might leave the poem in prose); whether the poem is completed only with the reader's act of understanding; whether revision brings a poem nearer to its ideal ending (when does a poet know when a poem has come to an end?); what is the right true end of poetry, and is the end of the poem the beginning of criticism, including an Arnoldian 'criticism of life'?

Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century

The search for comprehension continues with questions about the inhabitants at the end of the poem: ... Theending also confronts us with awall: Fernando,mirando elmurode diorita: “Carajo, ...

Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century

Has poetry lost its relevance in the postmodern age, unable to keep pace with other forms of cultural production such as film, mass media, and the Internet? Quite the contrary, argues Jill Kuhnheim in this pathfinding book, which explores how recent Spanish American poetry participates in the fundamental cultural debates of its time. Using a variety of interdisciplinary approaches, Kuhnheim engages in close readings of numerous poetic works to show how contemporary Spanish American poetry struggles with the divisions between politics and aesthetics and between visual and written images; grapples with issues of ethnic, national, sexual, and urban identities; and incorporates rather than rejects technological innovations and elements from the mass media. Her analysis illuminates the ways in which contemporary issues such as indigenismo and Latin America's postcolonial legacy, modernization, immigration, globalization, economic shifts toward neoliberalism and informal economies, urbanization, and the technological revolution have been expressed in—and even changed the very form of—Spanish American poetry since the 1970s.

Contemporary American Poetry Not the End But the Beginning

Though Roethke did not always use endrhyme , this poem has an abab end - rhyme scheme . Roethke wanted this poem to sound like a child's nursery rhyme , since it is from a child's point of view . The title specifies the dance as a waltz ...

Contemporary American Poetry   Not the End  But the Beginning

"Discover some of the poetry of leading contemporary American poets, including: Roethke, Bishop, Stafford, Lowell, Brooks, Wilbur, Ginsberg, Merwin, Plath, Collins, and Gluck"--Provided by publisher.

Poetry Barthes

Here it is the poetic convention of rhyme, but often placed partway through lines rather than at the end, which brings the rhyming words closer together and gives the sing-song effect of a short-lined rhyming poem within a poem whose ...

Poetry   Barthes

What kinds of pleasure do we take from writing and reading? What authority has the writer over a text? What are the limits of language's ability to communicate ideas and emotions? Moreover, what are the political limitations of these questions? The work of the French cultural critic and theorist Roland Barthes (1915-80) poses these questions, and has become influential in doing so, but the precise nature of that influence is often taken for granted. This is nowhere more true than in poetry, where Barthes' concerns about pleasure and origin are assumed to be relevant, but this has seldom been closely examined. This innovative study traces the engagement with Barthes by poets writing in English, beginning in the early 1970s with one of Barthes' earliest Anglophone poet readers, Scottish poet-theorist Veronica Forrest-Thomson (194775). It goes on to examine the American poets who published in L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E and other small but influential journals of the period, and other writers who engaged with Barthes later, considering his writings' relevance to love and grief and their treatment in poetry. Finally, it surveys those writers who rejected Barthes' theory, and explores why this was. The first study to bring Barthes and poetry into such close contact, this important book illuminates both subjects with a deep contemplation of Barthes' work and a range of experimental poetries.

Paul Philosophy and the Theopolitical Vision

The recitation of the poem is in a sense a messianic gesture; it is a machine that strains towards its end, the time it takes to come to the end of the poem. But because of its structure, where the end words are repeated and ...

Paul  Philosophy  and the Theopolitical Vision

The apostle Paul was a man of many journeys. We are usually familiar with the geographical ones he made in his own time. This volume traces others--Paul's journeys in our time, as he is co-opted or invited to travel (sometimes as abused slave, sometimes as trusted guide) with modern and recent Continental philosophers and political theorists. Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Benjamin; Taubes, Badiou, Zizek, and Agamben--Paul journeys here among the philosophers. In these essays you are invited to travel with them into the regions of philosophy, hermeneutics, political theory, and theology. You will certainly hear the philosophers speak. But Paul will not remain silent. Above the sounds of the journey his voice comes through, loud and clear.

Poetry Photography Ekphrasis

As stated at the beginning of this discussion, Hardy's conflict is not one that ends in a stalemate; reason and desire, mourning and melancholia are not deadlocked at the end of the poem. Instead, the rational succumbs to the irrational ...

Poetry  Photography  Ekphrasis

A detailed study of the ekphrasis of photography in poetry since the 19th century. Unlike other critical studies of ekphrasis, Miller's study concentrates solely on the lyrical ekphrasis of photographs, setting out to define how the photographic image provides a unique form of poetic ekphrasis.

Arthurian Women

Morgan le Fay is marginalized within the narrative by being placed at the end of the poem. But the poem marginalizes and thereby rehabilitates Guenevere by displaying her at the beginning of its own story, as a token of Arthur, ...

Arthurian Women

Featuring three original and 14 classic essays, this volume examines literary representations of women in Arthuriana and how women artists have viewed them. The essays discuss the female characters in Arthurian legend, medieval and modern readers of the legend, modern critics and the modern women writers who have recast the Arthurian inheritance, and finally women visual artists who have used the material of the Arthurian story. All the essays concentrate interpretation on a female creator and the work. This collection contains a useful bibliography of material devoted to female characters in Arthurian literature.

Latin Lyric and Elegiac Poetry

IV 8 For some, this poem, the last to or about Cynthia, is the culmination of Propertius's art. ... The tavem is the tavem into which Cynthia will chase Propertius's lovers at the end of the poem — Propertius did not follow her and so ...

Latin Lyric and Elegiac Poetry

First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The End of the World

That was still too depressing, Voltaire's friends told him, and so when the poem was finally printed in Geneva in February of 1756, the last two lines had been chopped off, leaving the poem to end on a note of mysticism: "Au sein de ...

The End of the World

Accounts of the apocalyptic endings of previous civilizations, cultures, and peoples--from the sack of Rome to Auschwitz--form an inquiry into disaster, atrocity and resilience

Robert Browning s Rondures Brave

The repetitions in the other poems do not so strongly suggest the rise and fall of the curtain as do these , but they have the same effect of disclosing at the outset the poem ' s subject and then at the conclusion indicating to readers ...

Robert Browning s Rondures Brave

Browning's Fra Lippo Lippi says that we may pass things a hundred times and never see them. One thing that Browning's readers have passed without seeing, or at least without remarking upon, is the circular conclusion in so many of his poems. Some sixty poems (almost a third of them) have such conclusions. These sixty span his entire career and include both well-known and neglected poems. The circular conclusion is so called because it returns to the introduction -- circles back round to it -- by repeating something from the introduction. Although in principle this rhetorical device is quite simple, in practice Browning works many and complex variations on it. Also, by incorporating this repeated words or phrases within the body of the poems, he uses them to make structural divisions. And above all, by selecting for repetition key words or phrases, he indicates central themes in the poems. An analysis of repetition in the poems allows us to see more clearly their circularity, the divisions of the circles, and their themes. It also brings to light thematic dynamism of the poems, some of them concluding with a restatement of the theme set forth in the repetition to trend at a point beyond the original idea, some reversing in their conclusions the statement made in the introduction, and some restating at the end the introductory statement after two reversals. Finally, by focusing on the introductions and conclusions of the poems, we clarify the dramatic situations, which are ordinarily established in these two places, and come to see their relationships with the monologues they encircle. All this we see, not with the optics of modern literary theory, but simply by looking at Browning's work with the same careful attention Fra Lippo Lippi pays to God's creation.

Poetry and Philosophy from Homer to Rousseau

Marsile, the Saracen leader, does not even plan the ambush himself, but is told what to do by Ganelon, Roland's treacherous and traitorous stepfather. In the end he dies cravenly, of sheer misery. His overlord, Baligant, is indeed wise, ...

Poetry and Philosophy from Homer to Rousseau

This accessible and jargon-free book features readings of over 20 key texts and authors in Western poetry and philosophy, including Homer, Plato, Beowulf , Dante, Chaucer, Shakespeare and Rousseau. Simon Haines presents a thought-provoking and theoretically aware account of Western literature and philosophy, arguing that the history of both can be seen as a struggle between two different conceptions of the self: the 'romantic' (or dualist) vs the 'realist' or ('extended').

Concerning Poetry

Simpson's indictment of the American condition is the dominant theme of the second part of "Walt Whitman at Bear Mountain," that is, from line twenty-seven to the end of the poem. "American dreams" emerge as a deafness, the inability to ...

Concerning Poetry


A Sociological Approach to Poetry Translation

The imposing figure of François de Malherbe, the 'reformer of French poetry',108 composed, at the end of the 16th century, a French version of this poem, not without some changes, the most important being the metrical framework.

A Sociological Approach to Poetry Translation

This volume provides an in-depth comparative study of translation practices and the role of the poet-translator across different countries and in so doing, demonstrates the need for poetry translation to be extended beyond close reading and situated in context. Drawing on a corpus composed of data from national library catalogues and Worldcat, the book examines translation practices of English-language, French-language, and Italian-language poet-translators through the lens of a broad sociological approach. Chapters 2 through 5 look at national poetic movements, literary markets, and the historical and socio-political contexts of translations, with Chapter 6 offering case studies of prominent and representative poet-translators from each tradition. A comprehensive set of appendices offers readers an opportunity to explore this data in greater detail. Taken together, the volume advocates for the need to study translation data against broader aesthetic, historical, and political trends and will be of particular interest to students and scholars in translation studies and comparative literature.

The End of the Poem

A collection of fifteen lectures in which Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon explores a diverse group of poems and their literary merit.

The End of the Poem

This visually engaging workbook is designed to help you learn and the master the necessary Functional Skills in Maths. With examples and questions written specifically for Construction, you will understand the relevance of FS and be able to apply them in the workplace. Free answers available at www.planetvocational.co.

Seamus Heaney and East European Poetry in Translation

All subsequent quotations of this poem in this section are taken from this source. 73. ... I borrow these words from Heaney: see the excerpt from his own poem at the end of 'Extending the Alphabet', in Redress of Poetry, p. 37.

Seamus Heaney and East European Poetry in Translation

"Poetry born of historical upheaval bears witness both to actual historical events and considerations of poetics. Under the duress of history the poet, who is torn between lamentation and celebration, seeks to achieve distance from his troubled times. Add to this a deep love for and commitment to the Irish and English poetic traditions, and a strong desire to search for models outside his culture, and you have the poetry of the Irish Nobel laureate Seamus Heaney (1939-). In this study, Carmen Bugan looks at how the poetry of Seamus Heaney, born of the Troubles in Northern Ireland, has encountered the'historically-tested imaginations' of Czeslaw Milosz, Joseph Brodsky, Osip Mandelstam, and Zbigniew Herbert, as he aimed to fulfil a Horatian poetics, a poetry meant to both instruct and delight its readers. Carmen Bugan is the author of a collection of poems, Crossing the Carpathians, and a memoir, Burying the Typewriter."

and Jean Renart Le Lai de l ombre

poem and the different areas of language from which it is drawn , since it is this variety and the juxtaposition of ... in the crucial episodes at the end of part one and beginning of part two , and once again at the end of the poem .

and  Jean Renart  Le Lai de l ombre


A study guide for American Literature to 1900

Since poetry has always been close to music, much of a poem's beauty comes to life only when it is heard. Read the poem aloud in a natural voice rather than in an artificial manner. Do not stop at the end of every line where there is no ...

A study guide for American Literature to 1900

Esta guía esta pensada para utilizarse conjuntamente con el libro American literature to 1900 de la misma autora y editado por la misma editorial. Ofrece los siguientes recursos adicionales como un extenso material complementario que ayuda y guía al alumno a lo largo de las 24 unidades, una colección de veinte ejemplos de exámenes y un glosario con una lista de los términos más importantes de la literatura en general y de la literatura americana en particular.

Poetry and Truth

When I reach the end of the poem , I see that it is truly a unified whole , and that it becomes such at precisely that point where it ends the last line . We might say that there is a paradoxical relation between the poem as it first ...

Poetry and Truth


The Cambridge Companion to Latin American Poetry

included in Rafael Aráiz Lucca's anthology of twentieth-century Venezuelan poetry, his Antología: la poesía del siglo XX en Venezuela, ... Jill Kuhnheim's comprehensive Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century (2004), ...

The Cambridge Companion to Latin American Poetry

The Cambridge Companion to Latin American Poetry provides historical context on the evolution of the Latin American poetic tradition from the sixteenth century to the present day. It is organized into three parts. Part I provides a comprehensive, chronological survey of Latin American poetry and includes separate chapters on Colonial poetry, Romanticism/modernism, the avant-garde, conversational poetry, and contemporary poetry. Part II contains six succinct essays on the major figures Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Gabriela Mistral, César Vallejo, Pablo Neruda, Carlos Drummond de Andrade, and Octavio Paz. Part III analyses specific and distinctive trends within the poetic canon, including women's, LGBT, Quechua, Afro-Hispanic, Latino/a and New Media poetry. This Companion also contains a guide to further reading as well as an essay on the best English translations of Latin American poetry. It will be a key resource for students and instructors of Latin American literature and poetry.