The Enemy at Trafalgar

This work was written just before the outbreak of the First World War, with the Entente Cordiale in place, and is therefore more balanced than some of the earlier English works on the period which tended to a more anti-French view.

The Enemy at Trafalgar

Of the many facets of the Napoleonic wars there are a vast number of books written in English on the climatic battle of the age of sail, perhaps only eclipsed by the wealth of material written on the Waterloo Campaign of 1815 as a single subject. However there is not a great deal written as to what went on on “the other side of the hill” or “the other side of the horizon”, amongst the French and Spanish commanders who faced Nelson and his band of brothers. Edward Fraser’s book goes a long way to redress that balance, and focuses on the many brave men that fought for the Napoleonic cause, some more willingly than others; men such as Don Miguel-Ricardo Alava, a Spanish nobleman who would have the rare distinction of being on the Anglo-Allied side at Waterloo and on the opposition side at Trafalgar. Edward Fraser was a prominent historian of the period having written a number of books on the great battle of Trafalgar and Wellington’s soldiers in the Peninsula. This work was written just before the outbreak of the First World War, with the Entente Cordiale in place, and is therefore more balanced than some of the earlier English works on the period which tended to a more anti-French view. A fine, detailed and very thoroughly researched account of what the enemy experienced during the battle of Trafalgar. Illustrations – 60 – all incuded

The Enemy at Trafalgar an Account of the Battle from Eye Witnesses Narratives and Letters and Despatches from the French and Spanish Fleets

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: .

The Enemy at Trafalgar  an Account of the Battle from Eye Witnesses  Narratives and Letters and Despatches from the French and Spanish Fleets

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XXVI HOW THE NEWS REACHED ENGLAND-- AND NAPOLEON THE battle was fought on Monday, the 21st of October. The first authentic news of it, and of Nelson's death, only reached London on Wednesday, the 6th of November, at one in the morning. A rumour, based on a newspaper paragraph, that there had been fighting at Cadiz, had been current in London for three or four days previously, but nothing was known as to what had taken place. In the "Morning Post" of the 2nd of November an editorial note stated that it was reported, on the authority of letters said to have been received from Lisbon, that "Lord Nelson had succeeded in destroying a great part of the Combined Fleet in the harbour of Cadiz"; but the Editor felt it his duty to add this: "Though from the enterprising character of the noble Admiral we cannot consider this rumour as improbable, we cannot at present attach any credit to it, from the circumstances of no advice whatever THE REAL ANXIETY OF THE HOUR 343 upon the subject having been received at the Admiralty." As a fact, the ship bringing the news of Trafalgar was not yet in the Channel. England, and indeed all Europe, was thinking of something else. The startling, and totally unexpected, news had just reached London of the complete overthrow of the first great army of the European coalition against Napoleon. The fate of the Continent was in the camp of General Mack at Ulm, it had been said: Mack himself was a scientific strategist of world-wide reputation; his troops were the pick of the Austrian army--the best appointed and disciplined soldiers of the time. Five days before the "Morning Post" published its rumour about Nelson at Cadiz, an empty boat had been towed out by a French pinnace from Boulogne and ostentatiously...

The Enemy at Trafalgar

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

The Enemy at Trafalgar

Excerpt from The Enemy at Trafalgar: An Account of the Battle From Eye-Witnesses' Narratives and Letters and Despatches From the French and Spanish Fleets Least of all a book such as this, which purports to relate incidents of Trafalgar as witnessed from the side of the enemy. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Enemy at Trafalgar

This book is slightly different since it follows the 'enemy' fleet from sailing to defeat, but Fraser's extensive research usefully draws on authoritative, vital and little known sources to support his narrative.

The Enemy at Trafalgar

The men and ships who fought Nelson Avid readers and students of the Napoleonic Wars are often disappointed at the paucity of information translated into English on the subject of French forces. This is particularly frustrating since it is well known that there is a wealth of material available in French concerning the war on land and at sea. This book will therefore be something of a treat for those interested in the naval conflict-particularly what is arguably the most famous and significant naval battle of the period-from the perspective of the French and Spanish officers and seamen involved. The author, Edward Fraser, wrote extensively on the history of the Napoleonic Wars and several more of his excellent books are available from Leonaur. His style is to present his subject as a series of vignettes, each focussing on a a particularly notable event or the experiences of a particular participant. This book is slightly different since it follows the 'enemy' fleet from sailing to defeat, but Fraser's extensive research usefully draws on authoritative, vital and little known sources to support his narrative. Leonaur editions are newly typeset and are not facsimiles; each title is available in softcover and hardback with dustjacket; our hardbacks are cloth bound and feature gold foil lettering on their spines and fabric head and tail bands.

The Enemy at Trafalgar

This is an OCR edition without illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from GeneralBooksClub.com.

The Enemy at Trafalgar

This is an OCR edition without illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from GeneralBooksClub.com. You can also preview excerpts from the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Original Published by: Hodder and Stoughton in 1906 in 500 pages; Subjects: Trafalgar, Battle of, 1805; History / Europe / France; History / Europe / Great Britain; History / Military / General; History / Military / Other; History / Military / Naval;

Trafalgar And Jutland A Study In The Principles Of War

The principles of mass and economy of force are evident in the strategy and tactics of Nelson at Trafalgar. Surprise The principle of surprise was not a significant factor at Trafalgar. Surprise is to be achieved by attacking an enemy ...

Trafalgar And Jutland  A Study In The Principles Of War

Sun Tzu approximately 2500 years ago said, “War is a matter of vital importance to the State....It is mandatory that it be thoroughly studied.” This statement has been proven valid since man began fighting and is as vital today as it was in the primordial days of warfare. At the Air Command and Staff College, we have taken heed of this warning and actively encourage our national military leaders, present and future, to study and to internalize the lessons of past wars. We do not believe this study has to be dry and boring as many history lessons seem to be. We believe that history can be entertaining and interesting as well as educational. Thomas Hardy said in 1906, “War makes rattling good reading . . .,”and this is the aim of our monograph series—to provide entertaining, interesting, and educational studies of history. In this study, three of our faculty members have combined to present a study of naval warfare. The focus is on two great naval battles—the Battle of Trafalgar and the Battle of Jutland. Many descriptions and accounts of these battles have been produced in the past, but the approach used in this study is unique. The battles are analyzed using the US Air Force’s list of the principles of war. The authors conclude that adherence to the principles of war played a significant part in both battles, and on a larger scale, conclude that protection of sea lines of communications is as vital in today’s economic structure as it was in Nelson’s and Jellicoe’s eras. We hope you find this study interesting, informative, and thought-provoking.-Brigadier-General R. A. Ingram.

Ramage At Trafalgar

I count on taking or destroying at least twenty of the enemy: I trust you won't disappoint me. And this is how we are going to do it.” Ramage, like every other man in the cabin, listened spellbound. Nelson did not hesitate once or use ...

Ramage At Trafalgar

Lord Ramage returns to fight in the most famous of Britain's sea battles. Summoned by Admiral Nelson himself, Ramage is sent to join the British fleet off Cadiz. Finding himself in the front line of battle, Lord Ramage must fight to save his own life as well as for his country.

A History of the Royal Navy

Collingwood to Lord Radstock, Collingwood to Duke of Clarence, 12 December 1805, in Collingwood (ed.), Correspondence, pp. 163–5; E. Fraser, The Enemy at Trafalgar (London: Chatham Publishing, 2004), p. 256; Lavery, Nelson's Fleet at ...

A History of the Royal Navy

The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars were the first truly global conflicts. The Royal Navy was a key player in the wider wars and, for Britain, the key factor in her eventual emergence as the only naval power capable of sustained global hegemony. The most iconic battles of any era were fought at sea during these years - from the Battle of the Nile in 1798 to Nelson's momentous victory at Trafalgar in October 1805. In this period, the Navy had reached a peak of efficiency and was unrivalled in manpower and technological strength. The eradication of scurvy in the 1790s had a significant impact on the health of sailors and, along with regular supplies of food and water, gave the British an advantage over their rivals in battle. As well as naval battles, the Navy also undertook amphibious operations, capturing many of France's Caribbean colonies and Dutch colonies in the East Indies and Ceylon; this Imperial dimension was integral to British strength and counteracting French success on continental Europe. This book looks at the history of the Royal Navy during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793-1815, from a broad perspective, examining the strategy, operations and tactics of British seapower. While it delves into the details of Royal Navy operations such as battle, blockade, commerce protection and exploration, it also covers a myriad of other aspects often overlooked in narrative histories such as the importance of naval logistics, transport, relations with the army and manning. An assessment of key naval figures and combined eyewitness accounts situate the reader firmly in Nelson's navy. Through an exploration of the relationship between the Navy, trade and empire, Martin Robson highlights the contribution Royal Navy made to Britain's rise to global hegemony through the nineteenth century Pax Britannica.

Transports of Delight

The Trafalgar companion: A guide to history's most famous sea battle and the life of Admiral Lord Nelson. ... The enemy at Trafalgar: an account of the battle from eyewitnesses' narratives and letters and despatches from the French and ...

Transports of Delight

This inspiring book shows how the spiritual side of life, with its thoughts, feelings, and aspirations, is intimately bound up with our material technologies. From the wonder of Gothic Cathedrals, to the quiet majesty of lighter than air flight, to the ultimate in luxury of the north Atlantic steamers, Peter Hancock explores how these sequential heights of technology have enabled our dreams of being transported to new and uncharted realms to become reality. Sometimes literally, sometimes figuratively, technology has always been there to make material the visions of our imagination. This book shows how this has essentially been true for all technologies from Stonehenge to space station.But technology is far from perfect. Indeed, the author argues here that some of the most public and tragic of its failures still remain instructive, emblematic, and even inspiring. He reports on examples such as a Cathedral of the Earth (Beauvais), a Cathedral of the Seas (Titanic), and a Cathedral of the Air (Hindenburg) and tells their stories from the viewpoint of material transcendence. By interweaving their stories he reveals how technologies can succeed in elevating human beings and, in taking them to whole new realms of being, he explores and explains why these experiences are ‘Transports of Delight.’

Lord Nelson 1758 1805

A. St. Leger Westall , ' Nelson and the Trafalgar Centenary ' , Monthly Review , vol . 20 ( JulySeptember 1905 ) , pp . 233-247 . 1161. Edward Fraser , The Enemy at Trafalgar ( Hodder & Stoughton 1906 ) . 1162.

Lord Nelson  1758 1805

Part of a 20-volume series covering the lives of British Prime Ministers, eminent statesmen and military leaders from the 18th century to the present day. Each volume contains a biographical essay, a chronology, a survey of manuscript sources, a bibliogrphy of relevant newspaper articles, a bibliography of historical and biographical works about the subject and his place in history and a bibliography of published works on the subject.

United States Congressional Serial Set

By Witness St. Juan D'Ulloa , a fortress of which it was once remarked that “ it was built of dollars ... produced by the French ships at the Nile , and more than four times as great as that produced by the same enemy at Trafalgar .

United States Congressional Serial Set


In Nelson s Wake

NMM, AGC/C/7, Thomas Connell to his father, 1 November 1805. Edward Fraser, The Enemy at Trafalgar (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1906), p.214. NMM, AGC/H/18, Lt William Hennah to his brother, 3 December 1805. Clayton and Craig, Trafalgar ...

In Nelson s Wake

Horatio Nelson’s celebrated victory over the French at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 presented Britain with an unprecedented command of the seas. Yet the Royal Navy’s role in the struggle against Napoleonic France was far from over. This groundbreaking book asserts that, contrary to the accepted notion that the Battle of Trafalgar essentially completed the Navy’s task, the war at sea actually intensified over the next decade, ceasing only with Napoleon’s final surrender. In this dramatic account of naval contributions between 1803 and 1815, James Davey offers original and exciting insights into the Napoleonic wars and Britain’s maritime history. Encompassing Trafalgar, the Peninsular War, the War of 1812, the final campaign against Napoleon, and many lesser known but likewise crucial moments, the book sheds light on the experiences of individuals high and low, from admiral and captain to sailor and cabin boy. The cast of characters also includes others from across Britain—dockyard workers, politicians, civilians—who made fundamental contributions to the war effort, and in so doing, both saved the nation and shaped Britain’s history.

The Napoleonic Wars

“Deployment of Troops, December 1, 1805,” in Mikhailovsky-Danilevsky, Opisanie, 145–48; Langeron, Journal inedit de la campagne ... Captain Pierre Servaux's account in Edward Fraser, The Enemy at Trafalgar: An Account of the Battle from ...

The Napoleonic Wars

The first truly global history of the Napoleonic Wars, arguably the first world war.

The Command of the Ocean

22 Corbett, Trafalgar I, 58–75, 98–104 and 114–20. Schom, Trafalgar, pp. ... Vivian Stuart and George T. Eggleston, His Majesty's Sloop-of-War Diamond Rock (London, 1978). 25 Oman, Nelson, pp. ... Fraser, Enemy at Trafalgar, p. 66.

The Command of the Ocean

The Command of the Ocean describes with unprecedented authority and scholarship the rise of Britain to naval greatness, and the central place of the Navy and naval activity in the life of the nation and government. It describes not just battles, voyages and cruises but how the Navy was manned, how it was supplied with timber, hemp and iron, how its men (and sometimes women) were fed, and above all how it was financed and directed. It was during the century and a half covered by this book that the successful organizing of these last three - victualling, money and management - took the Navy to the heart of the British state. It is the great achievement of the book to show how completely integrated and mutually dependent Britain and the Navy then became.

Life In Nelson s Navy

... 1909 A Narrative . . . of the capturing of the Hermione frigate, by Admiral Sir Edward Hamilton, Bt, printed privately, Sussex, 1899 The Enemy at Trafalgar, by Edward Fraser, London, 1906 Logs of the Great Sea Fights, 2 volumes, ...

Life In Nelson s Navy

This is a well-researched and highly readable account of naval life, both ashore and at sea, from a respected and admired historian and writer of whom it was written: ‘An author who really knows Nelson’s navy’ (Ramage’s Prize - The Observer) and ‘An expert knowledge of naval history’ (Ramage at Trafalgar - The Guardian).

Jack Tar

13 Even during the slow approach to the enemy at Trafalgar much was jettisoned while the ships cleared for action, and Captain Harwood of HMS Belleisle noted in his journal: 'Made all sail, bearing down on the enemy.

Jack Tar

The Royal Navy to which Admiral Lord Nelson sacrificed his life depended on thousands of sailors and marines to man the great wind-powered wooden warships. Drawn from all over Britain and beyond, often unwillingly, these ordinary men made the navy invincible through skill, courage and sheer determination. Yet their contribution is frequently overlooked, while the officers became celebrities. JACK TAR gives these forgotten men a voice in an exciting, enthralling, often unexpected and always entertaining picture of what their life was really like during this age of sail. Through personal letters, diaries and other manuscripts, the emotions and experiences of these people are explored, from the dread of press-gangs, shipwreck and disease, to the exhilaration of battle, grog, prize money and prostitutes. JACK TAR is an authoritative and gripping account that will be compulsive reading for anyone wanting to discover the vibrant and sometimes stark realities of this wooden world at war.

In the Hour of Victory

focus on Trafalgar see Peter Goodwin's The Ships of Trafalgar (2005). Rif Winfield's First Rate: The Greatest Warships of the Age of Sail (2010) is a lively study of the largest ships of the era. For seamanship there is still no rival ...

In the Hour of Victory

Between 1794 and 1815 the Royal Navy repeatedly crushed her enemies at sea in a period of military dominance that equals any in history. When Napoleon eventually died in exile, the Lords of the Admiralty ordered that the original dispatches from seven major fleet battles - The Glorious First of June (1794), St Vincent (1797), Camperdown (1797), The Nile (1798), Copenhagen (1801), Trafalgar (1805) and San Domingo (1806) - should be gathered together and presented to the Nation. These letters, written by Britain's admirals, captains, surgeons and boatswains and sent back home in the midst of conflict, were bound in an immense volume, to be admired as a jewel of British history. Sam Willis, one of Britain's finest naval historians, stumbled upon this collection by chance in the British Library in 2010 and soon found out that only a handful of people knew of its existence. The rediscovery of these first-hand reports, and the vivid commentary they provide, has enabled Willis to reassesses the key engagements in extraordinary and revelatory detail, and to paint an enthralling series of portraits of the Royal Navy's commanders at the time. In a compelling and dramatic narrative, In the Hour of Victory tells the story of these naval triumphs as never before, and allows us to hear once more the officer's voices as they describe the battles that made Britain great.