The English Hospital 1070 1570

This book - the first general history of medieval and Tudor hospitals in eighty-five years - traces when and why they originated and follows their development through the crisis periods of the Black Death and the English Reformation when ...

The English Hospital 1070 1570

The first English hospitals appeared soon after the Norman Conquest. By the year 1300 they numbered over 500, caring for the sick and needy at every level of society - from the gentry and clergy to pilgrims, travellers, beggars and lepers. Excluded from towns, but placed by main highways where they could gather alms, they had a complex relationship with medieval society: cherished yet marginalised, self-contained yet also parasitic. This book - the first general history of medieval and Tudor hospitals in eighty-five years - traces when and why they originated and follows their development through the crisis periods of the Black Death and the English Reformation when many disappeared. Nicholas Orme and Margaret Webster explore the hospitals' religious, charitable and medical functions, examine their buildings, staffing and finances, and analyse their inmates in terms of social background and medical needs. They reconstruct the daily life of hospitals, from worship to living conditions, food and care. The general survey is complemented by a regional study of hospitals in the south-west of England, including detailed histories of all the recorded institutions in Cornwall and Devon.

Hospital Chaplaincy in the Twenty first Century

5 G. Risse, Mending Bodies, Saving Souls: A History of Hospitals (New York, 1999). 6 N. Orme and M. Webster, The English Hospital 10701570 (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1995) p. 57. 7 C. Rawcliffe, Medicine for the Soul ...

Hospital Chaplaincy in the Twenty first Century

Issues of faith and spirituality have been resurgent in the UK since the opening of the twenty-first century. This book charts the impact of shifting attitudes towards spirituality through the experiences of health care chaplains. Rooted in a new and challenging interpretation of the chaplain's work in the past, the book moves on to describe a current crisis in the nature of spiritual care. Using the tools of practical theology to analyze these experiences, fundamental problems are identified for chaplains as they work within the culture of 'evidence based practice'. As the National Health Service struggles to balance its books in the face of national economic uncertainty, chaplains will continue to come under increasing levels of scrutiny. Some chaplains have faced the prospect of redundancy or cuts to their budgets, while a growing number of NHS Trusts no longer offer chaplaincy to patients out of hours. In this context the nature of chaplaincy itself has come into question, and rival models of the profession have emerged. Is chaplaincy a new and distinct profession within health care, based on evidence and available to all? Or is it State-funded religious activity, theoretically open to all but in practice utilized chiefly by the faithful few? In responding to these questions the book concludes with a vision of how chaplaincy can both maintain its integrity - and be a valued part of twenty-first century health care.

A History of Doughty s Hospital Norwich 1687 2009

English monasteries were , of course , not only a component of international Christianity , but of European ... N. Orme and M.Webster , The English hospital 10701570 ( Yale University Press : New Haven and London , 1995 ) , pp .

A History of Doughty s Hospital  Norwich  1687 2009

Based on primary resources and interviews with current residents and recent trustees, this well researched history traces the growth and progress of Doughty’s Hospital, an almshouse in Norwich, England, while examining the various philanthropic initiatives and social policies in Britain as a whole. From the hospital’s foundation at the bequest of the departed William Doughty in 1687 to its present condition, this record considers key aspects of the hospital’s development, including its residents, staff, financial management, and rules and regulations. With chapters on the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, this account makes a valuable contribution to the history of social welfare.

Medicine in the English Middle Ages

Rawcliffe, “Hospitals,” pp. 11–12. Rawcliffe describes the regimen of prayer at one London hospital as a “treadmill of pious gratitude” (p. 12). 35. Nicholas Orme and Margaret Webster, The English Hospital, 10701570 (New Haven, Conn.

Medicine in the English Middle Ages

This book presents an engaging, detailed portrait of the people, ideas, and beliefs that made up the world of English medieval medicine between 750 and 1450, a time when medical practice extended far beyond modern definitions. The institutions of court, church, university, and hospital--which would eventually work to separate medical practice from other duties--had barely begun to exert an influence in medieval England, writes Faye Getz. Sufferers could seek healing from men and women of all social ranks, and the healing could encompass spiritual, legal, and philosophical as well as bodily concerns. Here the author presents an account of practitioners (English Christians, Jews, and foreigners), of medical works written by the English, of the emerging legal and institutional world of medicine, and of the medical ideals present among the educated and social elite. How medical learning gained for itself an audience is the central argument of this book, but the journey, as Getz shows, was an intricate one. Along the way, the reader encounters the magistrates of London, who confiscate a bag said by its owner to contain a human head capable of learning to speak, and learned clerical practitioners who advise people on how best to remain healthy or die a good death. Islamic medical ideas as well as the poetry of Chaucer come under scrutiny. Among the remnants of this far distant medical past, anyone may find something to amuse and something to admire.

The Impact of Hospitals 300 2000

MEHGIS ; T. Foulds ( ed . ) , The Thurgarton Cartulary , Paul Watkins Medieval Studies , 8 ( Stamford , 1994 ) , p.cxlvi . N. Orme and M. Webster , The English Hospital 10701570 ( New Haven and London , 1995 ) , pp.41 , 176 .

The Impact of Hospitals  300 2000

The first wide-ranging collection of articles on the history of hospitals in the Mediterranean, northern Europe, and the Americas for over 17 years. The contributions present a nuanced approach to the impact of hospitals on society over a very long time period and an exceptional geographical range.

Hospitals and Urbanism in Rome 1200 1500

Henry's only recorded act in favor of an English hospital is a charter issued in 1184 or 1185, with which he confirmed ... The English Hospital 10701570 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995), 20–23, and 233 for St John in Exeter.

Hospitals and Urbanism in Rome  1200 1500

In Hospitals and Urbanism in Rome 1200 – 1500, Carla Keyvanian reconstructs three centuries of urban history by focusing on public hospitals, state institutions that were urban expressions of sovereignty, characterized by a distinguishing architecture and built in prime urban locations.

Transactions of the Royal Historical Society Volume 16

More hospitals dotted the English landscape than monasteries , priories and cells of the Benedictine , Cluniac ... xiv ; Nicholas Orme and Margaret Webster , The English Hospital , 1070-1570 ( 1995 ) , 11 , 35-41 ; Sheila Sweetinburgh ...

Transactions of the Royal Historical Society  Volume 16

A collection of major articles representing some of the best historical research.

The Routledge History of Poverty c 1450 1800

Make-do and Mend: Archaeologies of Compromise, Repair and Reuse (Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, 2012). Lemire, Beverly. ... The English Hospital, 10701570 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995). Parker, Geoffrey.

The Routledge History of Poverty  c 1450   1800

The Routledge History of Poverty, c.1450–1800 is a pioneering exploration of both the lives of the very poorest during the early modern period, and of the vast edifices of compassion and coercion erected around them by individuals, institutions, and states. The essays chart critical new directions in poverty scholarship and connect poverty to the environment, debt and downward social mobility, material culture, empires, informal economies, disability, veterancy, and more. The volume contributes to the understanding of societal transformations across the early modern period, and places poverty and the poor at the centre of these transformations. It also argues for a wider definition of poverty in history which accounts for much more than economic and social circumstance and provides both analytically critical overviews and detailed case studies. By exploring poverty and the poor across early modern Europe, this study is essential reading for students and researchers of early modern society, economic history, state formation and empire, cultural representation, and mobility.

The Knights Hospitaller in the Levant C 1070 1309

UKJ 2:554–6, nos 317–18; Cart Hosp 1:323–4, 445–6, nos 471, 663. ... 32–7; Nicholas Orme and Margaret Webster, The English Hospital 10701570 (London, 1995), pp. 13–20. 'A Twelfth-century Description', ed. Kedar, p. 18. 1182, p.

The Knights Hospitaller in the Levant  C 1070 1309

A detailed study of this famed religious-military order, written by the world's pre-eminent Crusades historian, and focusing on the years between the First Crusade and the Knights' conquest of Malta.

Knowledge and Practice in English Medicine 1550 1680

After the Reformation many hospitals were abolished , though a few like St ... 42 Nicholas Orme and Margaret Webster , The English Hospital 1070-1570 ( Yale University Press , New Haven , 1995 ) , pp . 147–66 . my face .

Knowledge and Practice in English Medicine  1550 1680

A major synthesis of the knowledge and practice of early modern English medicine.

The Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology in Britain

Norms and medical practice in the Middle Ages', Appetite 51(1), 7–9 Orme, N. and Webster, M. 1995 The English hospital 10701570, Yale University Press, London Powers, N. 2005 'Cranial trauma and treatment: a case study from the ...

The Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology in Britain

The Middle Ages are all around us in Britain. The Tower of London and the castles of Scotland and Wales are mainstays of cultural tourism and an inspiring cross-section of later medieval finds can now be seen on display in museums across England, Scotland, and Wales. Medieval institutions from Parliament and monarchy to universities are familiar to us and we come into contact with the later Middle Ages every day when we drive through a village or town, look up at the castle on the hill, visit a local church or wonder about the earthworks in the fields we see from the window of a train. The Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology in Britain provides an overview of the archaeology of the later Middle Ages in Britain between AD 1066 and 1550. 61 entries, divided into 10 thematic sections, cover topics ranging from later medieval objects, human remains, archaeological science, standing buildings, and sites such as castles and monasteries, to the well-preserved relict landscapes which still survive. This is a rich and exciting period of the past and most of what we have learnt about the material culture of our medieval past has been discovered in the past two generations. This volume provides comprehensive coverage of the latest research and describes the major projects and concepts that are changing our understanding of our medieval heritage.

Hospitals and charity

... The English Hospital 10701570 (New Haven, CN, 1995); C. Rawcliffe, The Hospitals of Medieval Norwich (Norwich, 1995); also by Rawcliffe see Leprosy in Medieval England (Woodbridge, 2006); Medicine for the Soul: The Life, Death, ...

Hospitals and charity

This is the first book in English to provide a comprehensive examination of the hospital movement that arose and prospered in northern Italy between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries. Throughout this flourishing urbanised area hundreds of independent semi-religious facilities appeared, offering care for the ill, the poor and pilgrims en route to holy sites in Rome and the eastern Mediterranean. Over three centuries they became mechanisms for the appropriation of civic authority and political influence in the communities they served, and created innovative experiments in healthcare and poor relief which are the precursors to modern social welfare systems. Will appeal to students and lecturers in medieval, social, religious, and urban history and includes a detailed appendix that will assist researchers in the field.

Later Medieval Kent 1220 1540

250–324; Knowles and Hadcock, 'Additions and Corrections to Medieval Houses: England and Wales [Hospitals]', English Historical Review 72 (1957), 76–85. 3 N. Orme and M.Webster, The English Hospital, 10701570(New Haven, CT and London, ...

Later Medieval Kent  1220 1540

A comprehensive investigation into Kent in the later middle ages, from its agriculture to religious houses, from ship-building to the parish church.

The Correspondence of Reginald Pole A biographical companion the British Isles

200–201 Z Zulley , Soulley , Sulley , Hugh ( † 24 Aug - 23 Oct 1570 ) : ? oc Baptist term 1554 minor canon Cant ... Nicholas Orme and Margaret Webster , The English hospital 10701570 ( New Haven : Yale University Press , 1995 ) , p .

The Correspondence of Reginald Pole  A biographical companion  the British Isles

Reginald Pole (1500-1558), cardinal and archbishop of Canterbury, was at the centre of reform controversies in the mid 16th century. This, the fourth volume in the series, provides a biographical companion to all persons in the British Isles mentioned in his correspondence, and constitutes a major research tool in its own right.

The English People at War in the Age of Henry VIII

... The English Hospital 10701570 (New Haven CT and London, 1995), 158–9; LP, XX, i. 412; Peterborough Local Administration: The Last Days of Peterborough Monastery, ed. W. T. Mellows, Northamptonshire RS 12 (Kettering, 1947), 101, ...

The English People at War in the Age of Henry VIII

War should be recognised as one of the defining features of life in the England of Henry VIII. Henry fought many wars throughout his reign, and this book explores how this came to dominate English culture and shape attitudes to the king and to national history, with people talking and reading about war, and spending money on weaponry and defence.

Health and Architecture

It is believed that the valetudinarium anticipated the Christian hospital (ibid., 50). 19. ... Nicholas Orme and Margaret Elise Graham Webster, The English Hospital 10701570 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995), 49. 31.

Health and Architecture

Health and Architecture offers a uniquely global overview of the healthcare facility in the pre-modern era, engaging in a cross-cultural analysis of the architectural response to medical developments and the formation of specialized hospitals as an independent building typology. Whether constructed as part of Chinese palaces in the 15th century or the religious complexes in 16th century Ottoman Istanbul, the healthcare facility throughout history is a built environment intended to promote healing and caring. The essays in this volume address how the relationships between architectural forms associated with healthcare and other buildings in the pre-modern era, such as bathhouses, almshouses, schools and places of worship, reflect changing attitudes towards healing. They explore the impact of medical advances on the design of hospitals across various times and geographies, and examine the historic construction processes and the stylistic connections between places of care and other building types, and their development in urban context. Deploying new methodological, interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to the analysis of healthcare facilities, Health and Architecture demonstrates how the spaces of healthcare themselves offer some of the most powerful and practical articulations of therapy.

The Renaissance Hospital

Cf. N. Orme and M. Webster , The English Hospital , 10701570 ( New Haven and London , 1995 ) , pp . 127-9 . 2. Rawcliffe , Medicine for the Soul , p . 65 . 3. Henderson , Piety and Charity . 4. Ibid . , ch.7 . 5. Ibid . , pp . 318–20 .

The Renaissance Hospital

John Henderson takes us into the Renaissance hospitals of Florence, recreating the enormous barn-like wards and exploring the lives of those who received and those who administered treatment there.

Women in England in the Middle Ages

Rawcliffe, 'Hospital Nurses and their Work', pp. 62—63; Cullum, Cremetts and Corrodies, p. 7. Rawcliffe, 'The Hospitals of Later Medieval London', p. 2; N. Orme and M. Webster, The English Hospital, 10701570 (New Haven, Connecticut, ...

Women in England in the Middle Ages

Medieval women faced many of the problems of their modern counterparts in bringing up their families, balancing family and work, and responding to the demands of their communities. Of many women in the period of a thousand years before 1500 we know little or nothing, though their typical ways of life, on farms or in the towns, can be reconstructed with accuracy from a variety of sources. We know more about a far smaller number of elite women, including queens such as Eleanor of Aquitaine and Margaret of Anjou; noblewomen, whose characters and attitudes can be sensed directly or indirectly; and a variety of religious women. Literary sources help flesh out real attitudes, such as those of Chaucer's Wife of Bath. Jennifer Ward shows the life-cycle of medieval women, from birth, via marriage and child-rearing, to widowhood and death. She also brings out the slow changes in the position of women over a millennium.

Charity and Religion in Medieval Europe

See nicholas orme and Margaret Webster, The English Hospital, 10701570 (new haven, Conn.: yale university press, 1995), 17–18; Sethina Watson, “the origins of the english hospital,” Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 16 ...

Charity and Religion in Medieval Europe

Challenges conventional views of medieval piety by demonstrating how the ideology of charity and its vision of the active life provided an important alternative to the ascetical, contemplative tradition emphasized by most historians

Financing Medicine

The British Experience Since 1750 Martin Gorsky, Sally Sheard ... N. Orme and M. Webster, The English Hospital 10701570, London, Yale University Press, 1995, pp. 11, 161–6. J. Lane, A Social History of Medicine, London, Routledge, ...

Financing Medicine

Financing Medicine brings together a collection of essays dealing with the financing of medical care in Britain since the mid-eighteenth century, with a view to addressing two major issues: Why did the funding of the British health system develop in the way it did? What were the ramifications of these arrangements for the nature and extent of health care before the NHS? The book also goes on to explore the 'lessons' and legacies of the past which bear upon developments under the NHS. The contributors to this volume provide a sustained and detailed examination of the model of health care which preceded the NHS - an organization whose distinctive features hold such fascination for the scholars of health systems - and their insights illuminate current debates on the future of the NHS. For students and scholars of the history of medicine, this will prove essential reading.